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Thread: Bead Filters, an American curse?

  1. #51
    Sansai WayneB's Avatar
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    I know this is a old thread but found it very interesting that one would want to use a Bead filter as a bio logical filter.

    In my area we use bead filters for mechanical filtration, i don't recall ever seeing anyone using for biological and although i can see and understand that it can work for biological i don't believe that it was designed with that in mind.

    Looking at my own bubble bead filter. The beads don't have much surface area and are very smooth, they only time they offer any type of decent surface area is when they are pushed together...this also being the method used for catching solids. My bubble bead is a sealed container in which solids get trapped, leaving it dirty over long periods of time creates a breeding area for anaerobic bacteria.

    So are the people using the bead filter to "grow" anaerobic bacteria?

    It sounds rather dangerous to me...and once it gets cleaned the colony of bacteria will surely take a knock. Not the best bio logical filter if you ask me.

    I clean my bead filter every 2-3rd day in fear the anaerobic bacteria.

  2. #52
    Sansai
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    Wayne, I certainly use mine for sole biological filtration. You say it has a small surface area but that clearly can't be so. The surface area of 50kg of beads must be enormous and certainly much bigger than almost any other form of filtration.

    I'd agree that trapping solids is a real issue. A good pre-filter and regular backwashing is vital. I don't personally find that backwashing disturbs the biofilm at all and is vital to keeping the anaerobes at bay

  3. #53
    Daihonmei
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    Quote Originally Posted by pondlife View Post
    Wayne, I certainly use mine for sole biological filtration. You say it has a small surface area but that clearly can't be so. The surface area of 50kg of beads must be enormous and certainly much bigger than almost any other form of filtration.

    I'd agree that trapping solids is a real issue. A good pre-filter and regular backwashing is vital. I don't personally find that backwashing disturbs the biofilm at all and is vital to keeping the anaerobes at bay
    Just happened to see this ponder,( I don't usually visit these sections)

    BB starts out with a decent surface area ( on paper) but that quickly declines when the beads are rested on one another. And then there is the friction caused by movement and tapping of one bead onto the next. the suface area begins to reduce rapidly even before biofouling begins -- remember the biofouling is organic and the bacteria that live on that organic satillite grow and double in number every 7 to 20 minutes. No amount of backwashing can compensate for that. One manufacturer recommends now that back washing be done four times a day on timers.
    The other concern of course is what you back wash with-- cold well water or chlorine water ( the very purpose is to kill bacteria) can set back a filter-- thankfully and ironically, the backwash does a poor job so that knocking down a BB is a hard thing to do. The only tell tale signs are spotty nitrIte readings that often haunt BB ponds. This is due to the slow rebound time of second stage nitrifiers when they are disrupted. Hope this helps the vision? JR

  4. #54
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WayneB View Post
    I know this is a old thread but found it very interesting that one would want to use a Bead filter as a bio logical filter.

    In my area we use bead filters for mechanical filtration, i don't recall ever seeing anyone using for biological and although i can see and understand that it can work for biological i don't believe that it was designed with that in mind.

    Looking at my own bubble bead filter. The beads don't have much surface area and are very smooth, they only time they offer any type of decent surface area is when they are pushed together...this also being the method used for catching solids. My bubble bead is a sealed container in which solids get trapped, leaving it dirty over long periods of time creates a breeding area for anaerobic bacteria.

    So are the people using the bead filter to "grow" anaerobic bacteria?

    It sounds rather dangerous to me...and once it gets cleaned the colony of bacteria will surely take a knock. Not the best bio logical filter if you ask me.

    I clean my bead filter every 2-3rd day in fear the anaerobic bacteria.
    When the Bubble Bead Filter was first introduced to Koi hobbyist at the 1996 A.K.C.A. Seminar in Orlando, Florida by Dr. Ronald F. Malone, the bead filter was sold as a biological filter.

    See USE of FLOATING BEAD FILTERS to PURIFY WATER in KOI PONDS. Before the introduction of the Bubble Bead Filter, I do not remember "bead filters" being popular with pond hobbyists.

    After the 1996 seminar I and other club members bought them but today I am not a fan of bead filters.

  5. #55
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WayneB View Post
    I know this is a old thread but found it very interesting that one would want to use a Bead filter as a bio logical filter.
    In my area we use bead filters for mechanical filtration, i don't recall ever seeing anyone using for biological and although i can see and understand that it can work for biological i don't believe that it was designed with that in mind.
    Looking at my own bubble bead filter. The beads don't have much surface area and are very smooth, they only time they offer any type of decent surface area is when they are pushed together...this also being the method used for catching solids. My bubble bead is a sealed container in which solids get trapped, leaving it dirty over long periods of time creates a breeding area for anaerobic bacteria.
    So are the people using the bead filter to "grow" anaerobic bacteria?
    It sounds rather dangerous to me...and once it gets cleaned the colony of bacteria will surely take a knock. Not the best bio logical filter if you ask me.
    I clean my bead filter every 2-3rd day in fear the anaerobic bacteria.
    You are correct; Not the best biological filter. But it is very common to see new to Koi hobbyist, with new "Koi ponds" filtered with only a bead filter and UV light.
    DRnNY likes this.

  6. #56
    MCA
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    Not just newbies. If you sam Thom Blischok's filter room for his fantastic system, it was a room of Aquadyne filters. Also Art and Nicole used to use bead filters and fluid beds before they retired from the hobby.

    Any filter technique has pros and cons. Ideally you use a hybrid/combo of two or more filters that complement each other.

  7. #57
    Fry
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    "Here at the shop, we have all our tanks with bottom drains. The crap (and there is a lot of crap as we feed an average of 2 tons of feed a year to the fish for sale) is gravity fed to a 1500 gallon settlement chamber. Water is pulled from the middle of the settlement chamber (within 6 inches of the surface) and run through two large multistory trickle style filters. The water is then picked up on the side and is drawn to the pumps, then to the bead filters. I have both, Aquadyne and Aquabead. I have a leaning to the Aquabead, but the dyne is a great filter as well."

    I like this classic and timeless setup. It's simply work and without complicating technology. Brilliant well done job.

    "Now, as far as streambeds and water falls go, I have a DIY display pond that I built for those on a budget. It consists of a 1800 gallon pond, 4 feet deep, 4 water falls, several streambeds, and a DIY settlement chamber that cleans the water before it gets to the external pump. The settlement chambers do have 1 section of the green mattala matting in each one to form a barrier between where the water runs in, and the pump picks it up."

    Another well thought and superb efficient setup.

  8. #58
    MCA
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    I now run by the BD circuits through Ultrasieve 3 units before the Aquadyne 4.4 bead filters. Both the US3 and Aquadynes are a great bit of kit. I also run a Bakki House shower from the skimmer. The shower is bypassed in the winter and will be restarted in the spring. The bead filters are used all year.

  9. #59
    Oyagoi yerrag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MCA View Post
    I now run by the BD circuits through Ultrasieve 3 units before the Aquadyne 4.4 bead filters. Both the US3 and Aquadynes are a great bit of kit. I also run a Bakki House shower from the skimmer. The shower is bypassed in the winter and will be restarted in the spring. The bead filters are used all year.
    Michael, what micron size are the Ultrasieve units?

  10. #60
    MCA
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    They are standard 300micron. You can get 200micron screens.

    SIBO | Professional Water Products

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