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Thread: Q for the bead filter owners...

  1. #1
    Tategoi moikoi's Avatar
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    Q for the bead filter owners...

    do you love it or hate it? do you always keep the KH above 150 PPM?

  2. #2
    Oyagoi Flounder's Avatar
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    Don't care about kh with it since it's only used to "polish" the skimmer circuit.

  3. #3
    Nisai Sigma Koi's Avatar
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    Used to hate it but I just rebuilt mine to add air backwash and a dome-style bottom drain, so ask me again in a month or so...

  4. #4
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    As a stand-alone filter, I consider a bead filter a poor choice. When used after effective mechanical filtration, it can be very good if regularly maintained. The best use is probably for mechanical filtration of the fine particulate other mechanical filters cannot capture, but the nitrification function will always be inherent if properly maintained. With my water, KH is never a concern. I do not believe KH levels would be any more of a concern with a bead filter than any other bio-filter. If there is a need for higher KH, I'd like to understand why.

  5. #5
    Jumbo RobF's Avatar
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    On my 5000 gallon full sun moderately overstocked liner pond I have used an Ultima II 6000 for two years for mechanical and biological filtration. I am very happy with it and I would recommend it to anyone. Three months after installation in my pond the water parameters stabilized and have never varied (except for hardness with rain and going green once at the 6 month point). My KH stays around 100. I backflush for about 3 minutes every third day (sometimes more often again related to rain), this is about 10% water change. The backflush water is often dark brown to start, to clear in minutes. I have no settling chamber only a leaf basket on the pump which I empty most days. The pump is strong, a ¾ hp Dragon, as it needs to be to turn the water over hourly through the long pull of 2” pipe. To me the modern garden pond setup of a skimmer and bottom drain plumbed to a pump via a leaf basket to a bead filter past a UV over a waterfall back into the pond is the simple, affordable, effective path to a pond to love. If your goal is truly champion koi in a pristine pond then bead won’t be your only choice.

  6. #6
    Tategoi
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    Quote Originally Posted by moikoi View Post
    do you always keep the KH above 150 PPM?
    I must confess my ignorance on this point. While I am familiar with the general designs of bead filters, I do not understand the relationship between using a bead filter and the carbonate hardness (KH) of the pond water.

    Could anyone enlighten me on this point?

  7. #7
    Jumbo RobF's Avatar
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    http://www.koihealthadvisor.org/kha_images/pdf/WaterQualityBeginnersGuide.pdf

    Nitrification
    Fish produce ammonia
    Nitrosomonas eat ammonia AND CARBONATES as food
    Notrosomonas & Nitrobacters consume 7.2 mg of carbonates for every
    1 mg of ammonia!
    1 kg of food (2.2 lbs) at 38-40% protein, produces 40 g. pure ammonia
    and consumes 295.2 g (295,200 mg) of carbonates!
    Feeding 4% of body weight per day – uses LOTS of carbonates!

  8. #8
    Tategoi
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    Rob, thank you for the reply. There is some good information in that PDF file to which you directed me. I am deducing that the inquiry of KH with respect to bead filters is not exclusively directed to bead filters themselves, but rather towards the requirement of KH upon bacterial nitrification in general?

    The roughly 7:1 ratio (weight:weight) of carbonates to ammonia is compelling. Assuming that the nitrifiers need that amount of carbonate, how is this being introduced into the water?

    In other words, if -- for every 1 kg (2.2 pounds) of fish food added -- the biological filtration is going to require 295 grams (about 10 ounces) of carbonate, is that requirement being met by components within the food itself? Alternatively, are folks using a lot of baking soda?

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