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Thread: Benefits between mud ponds vs. manmade ponds?

  1. #1
    Nisai SoCalSun's Avatar
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    Benefits between mud ponds vs. manmade ponds?

    What are the benefits? I see some people mention using it but, I don't really have a good understanding about it...

    Is it for grow out purpose and extra bug it can eat or something that has to do with minerals or soil?

    Can someone tell me the pros and cons?

  2. #2
    Oyagoi CarolinaGirl's Avatar
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    It's several things. It's the stocking levels (Very low, as compared to liner ponds), it's the minerals found in the pond's soil, it's the space. Probably more than just that though.

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    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    With the longer growing season in my climate, I can match or exceed the growth accomplished in a mud pond in many (perhaps most) instances, but attaining the same level of vibrancy and body form is a different matter. If we were in a KHV-free world, I would try returning pond-raised yonsai to a mud pond. It was a common practice in Japan, but not so much any more.

  4. #4
    Oyagoi HEADACHE6's Avatar
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    One Reason (after 6 months) .

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    Oyagoi CarolinaGirl's Avatar
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    DANG!!

  6. #6
    Daihonmei
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    natural abundant nutritious food

  7. #7
    Oyagoi
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    Quote Originally Posted by luke frisbee View Post
    natural abundant nutritious food
    Right!

    At low stocking densities normal for growing large koi (about 20 to 50 fish per acre or about one koi for each 40,000 to 100,000 gallons) the pond is able to produce an enormous amount of natural foodstuffs.

    At my farm this would include (but not be limited to) crawfish, fairy shrimp, ghost shrimp, chironomid larvae, mole cricket larvae, earthworms (wash in during rain), various aquatic plants, grass seeds, and a host of other things. As much as 50% of thier diet comes from natural foods.

    Coupled with low stocking density, high water quality and an extremely stable environment (hard to warm, cool, or change in any way fast, 2 million gallons of water) koi can do very well in a mud pond.

    One point, earthen fish culture ponds are also "man made."

    Not all mud ponds are the same. Some produce koi with more vibrant reds, others with darker blacks. Mud ponds can also be aerated, filtered, stirred, etc.

    Most areas that grow rice have the types of soils that koi do best in. Heavy, tight clays.

    Brett
    Brett

  8. #8
    MCA
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    Honmei MCA's Avatar
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    we got a good grip on the tight heavy clay over here in Georgia!

  9. #9
    Nisai SoCalSun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HEADACHE6 View Post
    One Reason (after 6 months) .
    I see what your saying and less money out of your pocket to feed them.

  10. #10
    Nisai SoCalSun's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fishbreeder View Post
    Right!

    At low stocking densities normal for growing large koi (about 20 to 50 fish per acre or about one koi for each 40,000 to 100,000 gallons) the pond is able to produce an enormous amount of natural foodstuffs.

    At my farm this would include (but not be limited to) crawfish, fairy shrimp, ghost shrimp, chironomid larvae, mole cricket larvae, earthworms (wash in during rain), various aquatic plants, grass seeds, and a host of other things. As much as 50% of thier diet comes from natural foods.

    Coupled with low stocking density, high water quality and an extremely stable environment (hard to warm, cool, or change in any way fast, 2 million gallons of water) koi can do very well in a mud pond.

    One point, earthen fish culture ponds are also "man made."

    Not all mud ponds are the same. Some produce koi with more vibrant reds, others with darker blacks. Mud ponds can also be aerated, filtered, stirred, etc.

    Most areas that grow rice have the types of soils that koi do best in. Heavy, tight clays.

    Brett
    Thanks for the abundent information Bret... Now, if I can find a natural pond in a city. But how about the cons of a mud pond...

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