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Thread: What is the best koi food for growth?

  1. #1
    Tosai alvin9xw's Avatar
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    What is the best koi food for growth?

    hi guys

    What is the best koi food for growth(brand name)?

    Can u guys share me your feeding regime? Do u guys feed your fish 100% growth food in summer months or do u guys mix it up? if u mix it up how many % growth/color food do u feed them? what do u thing about Saki Hikari do u guys have a good result in this koi food?

    Im new in this hobby and this is my first growing season so please help me..tnx

    alvin

  2. #2
    Jumbo
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    Alvin

    There is no definitive answer to your questions.

    Koi breeders here in Japan follow different feeding regimes, some maybe feed twice a day, others feed 6 times a day with autofeeders, others use on demand feeders, some feed just once a day. Add to that some feed floating pellets and some feed sinking pellets, and of course there are a number of brands that are used.

    I don't think that you'll go far wrong with Saki Hikari, it is very highly rated by Japanese breeders.

    Your question is a common one, at least once a year, and you'll find a wealth of opinions, as opposed to answers, in the archive of this forum using the search function.

    Mark
    Mark Gardner

  3. #3
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    Along the same lines as Mark... All of the major brands have a 'growth formula' pellet. These have higher levels of protein and often higher levels of fat. I don't think you can go wrong with any of them. I use a mix of pellets. When the pond finally gets over 74F, I will be feeding a mix of Hikari Growth, Hi-Silk and a little Saki Hikari. I would like to add some EA Show to the mix, but storage is an issue for me this year. Perhaps later in the year.

  4. #4
    Daihonmei
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    well, lets think about this logically instead of commercially---

    For a koi to grow like the ones we see in Nichirin Magazine, they need the following;

    1) good genetics that allows for that growth. Not all koi have that genetic potential and most male koi definitely can't due to sexual dimorphism ( males being smaller than females of the species).

    2) Good health- koi that are 'off' can't grow as the energy they take in is not efficiently directed to growth

    3) in a perfect environment- koi are separated by two cell layers from the outside water world. That means that thru diffusion, osmosis and active transport, they are very much like the quality of the water they are in. Good water allows for good growth

    4) Temperature-- koi are temperate water creatures that are in sync with the surrounding temperatures. As cold blooded creatures they are ruled by those temperatures. These two statements mean that at different temperatures energy derived from food is shifted to different purposes. So growth can be in length, or growth can be in girth or growth can be in the growing of eggs and reproductive organs.
    In short, koi need the right temperatures to grow. Ironcially however, if you give them those same temperatures at all times, you will see the results diminish over time.

    5) Protein - protein is the buidling block of muscle and growth. You must have protein in the diet. But too much protein for too long actually causes the growth to slow! Mixing in carbs and fatty acids becomes mandatory after a while if you expect a fish to grow.

    6) time- many hobbyists confuse 'good growth' with 'rapid growth'. You can understand the reaction until you think about it for a moment. A two year old force growth fish that is twice the size of a naturally grown fish leads one to believe that the FG fish will be at least twice the size of the natural fish when they are both seven. this is of course silly as all fish given points 1 thru 5 will be roughly the same size at age seven.

    the secret to growing fish well is not some deep mystical secret-- the food you should be giving should be seasonal type and the amounts should vary. In growth season ( late May to early Oct with late June, July, August and early/mid September being the core of the growth season), protein is needed and any pellet along with things like prawn and past foods will do the trick. You want to feed several times a day-- small amounts and make sure your water, filter and maintenance keep up with the output from the input, so to speak.
    Most of my koi are over 30 inches and a few are in the 36-38 inch range. they are full adults and are fed 4- 6 times a day in the summer months only. But fed high quality pellets ( Hikari, Ogata, etc) and supplements of live, paste, gelatin and fresh foods ( typically one or two of the six meals a day in high season). The sumps are dumped daily and the water is changed twice a week in high feeding season. JR

  5. #5
    Tosai alvin9xw's Avatar
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    Tnx for replying guys...

    Another Question..
    Can i feed my koi high protein diet when my water temperature is 73F in the afternoon but 65F in the morning?

    alvin

  6. #6
    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
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    alvin, you avg mean temp is 69 F......in my experience most growth food with high 30's to lower 40's for protein % can be fed cautiously at 68 F and increased once over 72 F. Keep an eye on floating waste and if noted skip a day's feeding and come back with half as much as what got them into trouble and cautiously increase the amount each day to just under the amount that pushed them over.

  7. #7
    Sansai
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    Quote Originally Posted by dick benbow View Post
    alvin, you avg mean temp is 69 F......in my experience most growth food with high 30's to lower 40's for protein % can be fed cautiously at 68 F and increased once over 72 F. Keep an eye on floating waste and if noted skip a day's feeding and come back with half as much as what got them into trouble and cautiously increase the amount each day to just under the amount that pushed them over.
    Dick, interesting answer and something I have been doing for years. I know when I push the limit during the differing feeding seasons with food of differing protein and component levels I will get floating jelly like feces. Even in florida I change their diet throughout the year with a brief fasting period and months of limited caloric intake.
    Cut back a little on the feed or richness of the feed and problem solved.
    Do you know what causes this too happen?
    It is something I have been practicing for years but do not recall coming across any literature regarding this.

  8. #8
    Sansai almostgeorgia's Avatar
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    Recent Literature on Feeding Rates

    Just to 'throw a little fuel on the fire' for the purposes of discussion on this subject, the April/May '08 issue of Koi Nations magazine has a detailed study on maximizing growth rates vs. feeding intervals. In summary, the author, Jasper Kuijper, purports to show through detailed analysis that two feedings a day can produce the best results with the lowest level of 'waste' byproducts. An interesting read with a lot of data to back up his position.
    Last edited by almostgeorgia; 04-21-2010 at 02:09 PM. Reason: Missed the year of the publication cited in original message

  9. #9
    Tosai alvin9xw's Avatar
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    thx guys!! gonna start to feed them high protein food next week when the temp is 70f but very little and add more when the temp increases..

  10. #10
    Oyagoi kntry's Avatar
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    Alvin, I have a question. You said your temp is 65 am and 73 pm. How large is your pond, gallons??? You shouldn't have a temp swing that large. If your pond is small, be careful on how fast your fish grow. You will be overcrowded and have water quality issues which will lead to health problems.

    Just some food for thought.

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