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Thread: question

  1. #1
    Tosai
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    Apr 2010
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    Question question

    hi all im new here and would like some answers to some questions that I have.

    1st, what are uv lights used for and are they needed?

    2nd, will a 10x13 pond liner be too big for two 4-5in koi's? or can i just keep them in my 10 gallon () tank till they get big?

  2. #2
    Nisai Seveny's Avatar
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    UV light can kill the green elga and lichen in the water. But also it is easy to destroy the whole bio balance of your pond. If your filtration system is power enough, you don't need that.

    Never heard water is too much to a fish. Actually into a wider water space, kois can grow faster than just live in a small aquarium.

  3. #3
    Jumbo bighatbulls's Avatar
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    UV is used to kill unicellular algae, it won't get all of it but it will reduce the amount of algae in the water. This is only one part of your filtration system however. You will need a biofilter, a pump big enough to turn your water over at least 2x's an hour, and somehow you need to aerate that water. You also might want to think about a skimmer and a bottom drain, because this will make cleaning your pond easier then you will also need to add a leaf catcher to keep your pump from getting clogged up with debris. If you want to try to make your own filter there are sevral ones on youtube including mine that you can look at.

    What shape are you planning to build the pond in? Are you going for a more natural look or a pond that is rectangular (formal). What kind of liner is it? Idealy you want the deepest part of your pond to be 4 feet or more. Maybe you want to think larger?

    Last thing, most fish need at least 10 free gallons per inch of their body length. It would be best to either move them to a larger aquarium or get them into a pond asap.

  4. #4
    Tosai
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    hey thanks for the replies. I now understand the uv light.

    as far as building my first pond i was thinking of using this kit from the local home depot

    Beckett Medium Complete Water Garden Kit - MCK325 at The Home Depot

    and kinda going this route but with a little more shape since I am on a budget.

    YouTube - koi pond homemade less than $300

    let me know what you guise think, Thanks!

  5. #5
    Oyagoi CarolinaGirl's Avatar
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    Koi need a minimum of 300 gallons each and a minimum pond size of 1000 gallons. That kit from home depot is not even close to suitable for koi. It is a small watergarden that might be good enough for a couple of goldfish.

  6. #6
    Jumbo bighatbulls's Avatar
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    I only know of one pro that has kept koi in ponds under 1000 gallons, however that person does 10% water changes daily, and has a properly set up system.

    If I was to build something like the pond from youtube I would want a liner no less than 17X19 made out of rubber not PVC. If the pond you build is 5WX4Dx8L that will give you a little over the recomended 1000 gallons.You will also need an underlayment to protect the liner from sharp rocks, roots etc.

  7. #7
    Jumbo bighatbulls's Avatar
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  8. #8
    MCA
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    Honmei MCA's Avatar
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    skip the water garden that would like to be a koi pond.

    check out this wonderful set of steps on designing/bulding a proper koi pond.


    A Guide to Modern Koi Pond Construction.

  9. #9
    Daihonmei PapaBear's Avatar
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    You need to define your "purpose" and then make a plan.
    You'll be a LOT happier if you do, believe me
    I started a thread a good while back that addressed a lot of questions about different types of ponds that provoked some pretty good discussion amongst the crowd. A bit of extraneous stuff crept in here and there, but I still think there is some value you might glean from it.

    Hobby Distinctions

    Also, one of my all time favorite resources for people who are considering a Koi pond can be found here. Nishikigoi Pond Filteration.pdf (application/pdf Object)
    It is one of the best presentations for planning and understanding a Koi pond you'll ever find.
    Find your purpose, stay on that task WITHOUT COMPROMISE and you'll be a happy camper
    Larry Iles
    Oklahoma

  10. #10
    Nisai DrCreosote's Avatar
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    Planning ahead

    It sure would have been nice to have planned our first koi pond in advance. As it happened, we rented a house that had what I believe to have been about a 60 gallon preformed garden pond. Not content with just a tub of water in the garden, we decided to put koi in it. I don't remember the exact conversation, but it had more to do with how pretty they looked than anything else. This thing had only a circulating pump with a foam filter on it. No wonder they all died, right? (all but two, actually).

    Our next pond was a novice-built thing, but since I know how to dig holes, we were miles ahead. We ordered more liner than we had pond, and we were in a hurry because the two fish who survived (one koi, one fancy comit) were getting bigger (along with the other koi we got somewhere along the way) and filling up the aquarium. It was an obvious stressor to the fish to be that confined. So rather than dig more, we rushed it into service. Then we had to fix another problem later on, oh boy, oh joy.

    I said all that to reinforce the point that you should plan this out completely before you ever dig a thing. Bigger is always better, and the better the plan, the less fixing you will have to do later.

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