Home | About Us | Contact Us


Koi Forum - Koi-Bito Magazine straight from Japan
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: flukes, protozoa and crustaceans. A hunting we will go

  1. #1
    Daihonmei
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    7,642

    flukes, protozoa and crustaceans. A hunting we will go

    yep, these are the big three of the ecto-parasitic world. Some dedicated parasites and others just opportunists that do indirect harm they are all bad news when present in large numbers on our koi.

    You will often hear about a consumer's dream in regards to eradicating to these pests, in the form of a bottle of this and a pinch of that. This is often called a 'shot gun' approach which instantly conjures up an image of a shot gun pellet pattern that takes out anything within a two foot radius fired upon. Indeed, 'take out' is part of the this approach as it blows a hole in the entire ecology of an established koi pond.
    On the other hand, I've always admired the sniper. Equipped with the high tech rifle the sniper is able to patiently stalk the target, take careful aim and accomplish the mission with a single shot and with one small well placed hole!
    So lets put down our weapons and exam our targets a little closer--

    'parasites' are NOT all the same. They are vastly different species! Flukes are worm like creatures that although not visible to the human eye, are large and well defined creatures in the micro world. They crawl like an ich worm and have special organs to latch onto and dig into koi skin. They come in two species, one a live bearer and one an egg layer. And in that slight distinction one can be killed in one shot and the other might take two ( one for the adults and one for the eggs when they hatch). And there are 'bullets' that will kill both adult and egg.
    Protozoa make up the largest group of ecto-parasites that plague our koi. These are truly tiny and repersent a host of odd shaped aliens that in come cases have entire life cycles in/on and around our koi. It is a rare pond that has NO protozoa present. Not a big deal unless something happens to the water quality or koi's resistance and then it is a very big deal. Your mission is not to eradicate every last protozoa ( an impossiblity actually) but rather to assure they they are just one more unimportant resident of an outdoor pond and never 'common' in terms of that presence. One well placed shot will take out the target. But more important is the skill to assure you have created an enviroment that is hostile to their needs. And the bullet simpy kills the adult or the stages in typically one to two shots.
    Finally, we have the 'insect' like crustaceans. These are maco parasites that can be seen by the human eye in adult stages. These are perhaps the easiest to target and hit with one well aimed single shot. That is a clean shot and single bullet that simply stops the target from growing.

    Each of these species requires a different method and sometimes a smarter bullet. But one bullet. After some practice of spotting , scoping and aiming, you will become skilled at applying the right remedy to the the target species and individual circumstances.
    Meanwhile leave the shot gun to the unskilled and ideally, safely locked away from the beginner. And I'll remind you, more deadly accidents come from the careless use of home shot guns than from special high powered rifles in the hands of a skilled and well trained sniper.
    JR

  2. #2
    MCA
    MCA is offline
    Honmei MCA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Atlanta
    Posts
    2,574
    Every parsite hunting license should list recommended tools:

    microscope that can go to 400x power (along with slides and covers)
    good reference book to help you identify the bugs
    treatment chemicals (ie PP, FMG, Prazi, Dimlin) and dosing protocols (all of that should be in the good reference book)
    accurate knowledge of the pond water volume (can't treat properly without that!!!)
    good quality water test kit that is not expired or left out in extreme temps
    pH meter and ORP meter (personally would never treat with PP without a calibrated ORP meter)

  3. #3
    Sansai tranquility's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Wagoner,Ok.
    Posts
    284
    JR thanks for another good read first thing in the mornin'....So am I getting this right--I thought you had said something to this effect a few years back---all of these critters are just naturally in our ponds...its only when the fish are stressed when the bugs are able to attack this fish...soo every pond has them--but, as long as the water and fish stay healthy then they don't become a problem--right?
    Lawanna

  4. #4
    Oyagoi gcuss's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Maple Falls, WA
    Posts
    1,620
    Quote Originally Posted by tranquility View Post
    JR thanks for another good read first thing in the mornin'....So am I getting this right--I thought you had said something to this effect a few years back---all of these critters are just naturally in our ponds...its only when the fish are stressed when the bugs are able to attack this fish...soo every pond has them--but, as long as the water and fish stay healthy then they don't become a problem--right?
    Lawanna

    This factoid cost me my filters and a month and a half of growing time in the short summer I get...

    My fish were fine, but I was bored one day and grabbed some schmootz from my filter/settlement and low and behold.... I found some parasites!! Well, long story short, I go completely mental and blast my pond and filters to kingdom come (thankfully I was educated enough not to harm the koi) but basically had to try and start up all over again in July with my bacteria colony.... Ughhh, never make that mistake again.


    Great read, thank you JR.


    Grant

  5. #5
    Jumbo bighatbulls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Reedley, California
    Posts
    907
    Quote Originally Posted by MCA View Post
    Every parsite hunting license should list recommended tools:

    microscope that can go to 400x power (along with slides and covers)
    good reference book to help you identify the bugs
    treatment chemicals (ie PP, FMG, Prazi, Dimlin) and dosing protocols (all of that should be in the good reference book)
    accurate knowledge of the pond water volume (can't treat properly without that!!!)
    good quality water test kit that is not expired or left out in extreme temps
    pH meter and ORP meter (personally would never treat with PP without a calibrated ORP meter)
    I was just about to start a thread about what I need in my "parasite kit" when I read this MCA. Thanks

    Great thread JR

Similar Threads

  1. skin flukes
    By sav3406 in forum Main Forum
    Replies: 63
    Last Post: 03-19-2012, 07:56 AM
  2. flukes in QT
    By marct in forum Main Forum
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-26-2010, 06:57 PM
  3. Eye Flukes
    By Sangreaal in forum Main Forum
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 05-25-2006, 11:57 AM
  4. Flukes
    By Russell Peters in forum Main Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-31-2005, 11:56 AM
  5. Possilbe new treatment for flukes?
    By B.Scott in forum Main Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-11-2004, 03:04 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Articles - Sitemap - FAQs and Rules

KB Footer Graphic
Straight from Japan... For the serious hobbyist!
All content and images copyright of: Koi-bito.com