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Thread: 6" Phoam Phraxionator Plan - 1500-1800 GPH

  1. #11
    Fry
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    heres the pics , started working straight away lucky i had the camera on hand !!!









    producing 2-3mm of foam per second !!!!

    and all for the costly price of £64.00 GBP lolz


    steve

  2. #12
    MCA
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    Honmei MCA's Avatar
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    and all for the costly price of £64.00 GBP
    Highway robbery!!! Demand a refund!!!!!!!

    Seriously filters such as TTs, showers, fractionators, are some of the best things we can do for our ponds.

  3. #13
    Nisai ZEBRA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MCA View Post
    Highway robbery!!! Demand a refund!!!!!!!

    Seriously filters such as TTs, showers, fractionators, are some of the best things we can do for our ponds.

    Hi what dose a fractionator actually do,? and what is in the foam it removes ?
    thanks

  4. #14
    Oyagoi Ethan25's Avatar
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    Here is a recent thread that talks about the use.

    Word on the Street: $75-$85 phoam phraxionator

  5. #15
    Meg
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    it removes dissolved organics.
    this is from the other thread of Eathan's....

    Posted by James P on 2/17/2007, 12:01 pm
    http://members4.boardhost.com/koimag/msg/1171717287.html

    It looks like the organic management thread has hit the wall in terms of stimulating interest? But it is probably THE most important topic when it comes to koi pond management. Certainly for the intermediate and advanced hobbyist this is a more important discussion than ammonia conversation or pH conversation as those parameters are easy to master and subjects for beginners. And maybe less understood- it is organic waste management that ultimately affects ammonia output and pH threats.

    Organic issues show up in much more subtle ways however. But they represent a ticking time bomb that can quickly/eventually cause disease, parasite proliferation, a weak immune system thru low level stress, pH crash, gas ration issues etc.

    Some of the common warning signs that things are getting out of control are:
    Chronic high nitrate levels
    Chronic low ORP
    Chronic string
    Nagging nitrite levels
    Yellow water
    Cloudy/murky water
    Sluggish fish behavior
    Odors from the sump
    Falling pH
    And foam on the water surface

    From all these things, we can create two sub-lists. One is the physical manifestation of a eutrophic environment as it moves from low organic load to high organic load. This is of course, the nature of a closed system and as such, is inevitable. It is a form of ‘aging’ as the biology does its thing. This causes a gradual shifting of the microbial mix until an imbalance and/or new dominating species results. Additive intervention in the form of strong oxidative chemicals (chlorine, PP or ozone) ‘clean’ some of the ‘aging’ conditions but not all, creating an imbalance of its own making in the process. So that is certainly not the answer to managing organic trends.

    The evidence of this process of ‘aging’ or eutrophication trend is seen environmentally when the water becomes cloudy (bacteria bloom) or the water becomes green (single cell algae) or string algae begins to grow inches per day. This is the physical ‘world’ changing within the pond.

    The second list would be the byproduct of such a trend. These are chemicals, proteins or dyes released BY the above mentioned environmental shift. And these show as stained water (yellow humic acids), nagging nitrite (denitrification), chronic nitrate (over active biofilter) or foam on the water surface. All of this in turn, results in sluggish or moody fish (loss of appetite and bottom sitting).

    Among the indicators in the second list I’d like to discuss DOCs as that is the number one sign of excess organics in the water column. DOCs will quickly come and go based on pond design, feeding technique, turnover rate and stocking levels. DOCs (Dissolved organic carbon/compounds) are nothing more than ‘the leftovers’ from either fish digestion or bacterial/algal activity. It is a catch all name for molecules of protein, carbohydrates, lipids, starches, sugars, amino acids, fatty and organic acids, the molecules of color food, dyes, hormones from fish and algae and of course humic acid
    (which is what stains the water) etc.

    These items are too small to filter out mechanically or settle out. In fact they are resistant to settling as they are ‘electrically charged ‘to float towards the surface where forces of thin layer of ‘skin at the surface’ attract them. There these tiny components gather and foam ‘rafts’ of organic and vitamin rich organic material. This in turn attracts free swimming heterotrophic species called ‘wolf packs’ that attack the nutrient source and perform the first step of biological decay- mineralization. This in term feeds protozoa that fed on those bacteria. These all becomes part of the general biomass (along with fish and biofilter bacteria) that is pulling down water quality and reducing oxygen and increasing other species of nitrogenous waste materials and gases. And as will all pollution factors in the water, depending on extent, these things will cause disease or infestation or simply reduce the growth of koi in both size and color development.

    It is unfortunate that the beginner is told that ponds need to be given a ‘good cleaning’ twice a year because the filter is ‘asleep’ in winter and the waste accumulates. It is really just another stress factor for the fish at that point. A point when winter exhaustion has the fish slightly or greatly weakened depending on winter care techniques.

    Instead of this approach, it is probably better to advise the beginners within your chapters to maintain the organic issues 365 days a year with a regular weekly and monthly routine and to incorporate the latest technology for organic waste management. I think it would be very wise for chapters to spend more time on proper stocking guide lines and proper seasonal feeding techniques in order to manage what goes into the pond and how the pond can be run efficiently.

    Running long as usual. DOC removal in another post. JR

    *Well, you can't stop DOC from happening? It is a natural byproduct of koi activity. You can manage it and remove it, but not prevent it. I think you mean manage when you say 'prevent,' right? JR

  6. #16
    Oyagoi CarolinaGirl's Avatar
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    I have to build one of these for the new pond. Does it need to be kept running all the time like a bio-filter or can it be put on a timer?

  7. #17
    Oyagoi HEADACHE6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarolinaGirl View Post
    I have to build one of these for the new pond. Does it need to be kept running all the time like a bio-filter or can it be put on a timer?

    Cindy , Run it 24/7 . Remember that you will be Degassing your water while also removing the dissolved organics .

  8. #18
    Oyagoi CarolinaGirl's Avatar
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    So what about using this instead of a shower filter? The new pond is going to be run on air-lifts and I really didn't want to add any water pumps, but will have an 1800 magdrive on a shower filter (from the skimmer circiut). Maybe I could use a FF instead of the shower? My electric bill is killing me!! lol!

  9. #19
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarolinaGirl View Post
    So what about using this instead of a shower filter? The new pond is going to be run on air-lifts and I really didn't want to add any water pumps, but will have an 1800 magdrive on a shower filter (from the skimmer circiut). Maybe I could use a FF instead of the shower? My electric bill is killing me!! lol!
    If your new pond is going to be run on 'air-lifts', and your "air pump" is big enough, investigate using a foam fractionator powered by 'air stones'.

    This is the most common form of foam fractionators.

  10. #20
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    <message deleted>

    sorry, I did not read the whole post carefully

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