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Thread: Kentaro Sakai On Raising Koi For Show

  1. #81
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    When it comes to my koi hobby, I always do it in the Japanese way if I have the knowledge and the funds to do it. After all this is their culture! So I had my pond built right from the start in Japanese style but without the Japanese garden.......wish I had that too. LOL! My pond, after over 20 years, is still in very good running condition including good filtration capability even comparing to today standards. Is it the perfect pond? Of course NOT!!! Many.... koi ponds can be found in town but very.... few built and designed with good filtration. I think this is the reason why the koi hobby never takes off because of that.

    My outdoor pond uses 2 Hiblow 120; 2 Hiblow 80, 1 Medo LD-60; 2 Medo LD-40 plus one brand new Hiblow 120 for emergency use just in case. All the above 3 Medo air pumps are bought directly from Japan while I was there. In the “old” days, it was almost impossible to get any Japanese’s koi products and supplies. There was no internet like today that you can buy from. EVERYTHING had to come straight from Japan while I or my dealer (only one locally at that time and I am sorry to say that he is no longer with me) went there. Had about a dozen air pumps directly from Japan but only the above three are still in working condition.

    I also have four 2” return lines. Two of them each fitted with the 2” venturi from Japan; One 2” return with the heat exchanger in line (venturi removed and not used); the last return just straight out in a corner (venturi never use and still in brand new condition). With all of these, my pond’s water surface is always wavy even in winter time. All air pumps are in operation all year round including the winter months. The only thing that I do is just to reduce the air flow into the venturis.

    I do think that wavy surface is a good thing to have in koi ponds no matters how you create it; since all the air exchange is done through the surface of the pond. More oxygen can be mixed into the water and CO2/unwanted gas in the water can be escaped from the surface. In addition koi can do more exercise with the strong currents is another benefit that I can think of!


    Derrick

  2. #82
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by koi2kichi View Post
    [SIZE=3][FONT=Calibri] Is it the perfect pond? Of course NOT!!!

    Derrick
    When thinking in terms of a "perfect pond", the purpose or goal has to be considered. I don't believe there is a "perfect pond" for all purposes. What is needed for a hobbyist raising up tosai or nisai is different from what is needed by a hobbyist raising 80cm koi for show. Sakai, for example, made clear a strong preference for the mudpond for younger fish, and a concrete pond in a protected environment for more mature koi being raised for show. The hobbyist using one pond to raise koi of all ages and varieties together will be searching for the happy medium that works best for their situation. Over time the hobbyist's goals will change, but most are not in a position to add more ponds or renovate an existing pond to match the goal du jour. Nonetheless, if a particular focus exists in the hobbyist's enjoyment of koi, it can lead in a particular direction when planning a new pond intended to last for decades. Life is filled with compromises.

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
    When thinking in terms of a "perfect pond", the purpose or goal has to be considered. I don't believe there is a "perfect pond" for all purposes. What is needed for a hobbyist raising up tosai or nisai is different from what is needed by a hobbyist raising 80cm koi for show. Sakai, for example, made clear a strong preference for the mudpond for younger fish, and a concrete pond in a protected environment for more mature koi being raised for show. The hobbyist using one pond to raise koi of all ages and varieties together will be searching for the happy medium that works best for their situation. Over time the hobbyist's goals will change, but most are not in a position to add more ponds or renovate an existing pond to match the goal du jour. Nonetheless, if a particular focus exists in the hobbyist's enjoyment of koi, it can lead in a particular direction when planning a new pond intended to last for decades. Life is filled with compromises.

    Hi Mike,

    Always good to hear from you!

    First of all, we as koi hobbyists should never be compared to the very best breeders in the world. We will never have their generations of experiences on breeding/raising millions of high quality koi annually and the resources required becoming a successful breeder/koi keeper. In general any koi hobbyist that has more than two good/functional ponds should be considered a lucky person.

    Very few koi hobbyists dare to say that they have the “perfect pond”! There is always something that can be done to improve a pond! In fact there are a few things that I can do to improve my pond. Do I have to do the improvements? Are the improvements must be done in order to make it a proper koi pond? The answer to both questions is “NO”!

    In my case, my 20,000 gallons outdoor pond was my very FIRST pond built over 20 years ago. Designed by myself (according to our famous Kato-san’s 1,000 tons pond) without any help from anyone including the local koi club and also I am not even a DIY person; the end product is indeed very good overall and very functional/effective as a koi pond. I would consider it close to “perfect” in my own term! With the proper water/pond management and maintenance, it will last for “decades”. It is definitely an “all purpose” pond for most hobbyists since most of us can only have one or two ponds. Nevertheless I will not keep any small koi (6”) in there due to the 6” bottom drains.

    Lastly, it amazed me that very few koi keepers in North America that build their ponds in Japanese style. The filtration part that I am referring to, not the Japanese garden, WHY NOT learn or follow the very best in the world??? The pond design from Japan is quite simple most of the time and most importantly very.... effective!!! Sometimes I have a hard time to understand the ponds being built in North America. Majority of the koi keepers in town told me that they didn’t have the room required to build the proper filters, unfortunately most of the time it was not the case. They just didn’t design the pond right in the first place or not use the land properly that they have. If I don’t have enough room for building my own pond, I personally would rather have a smaller pond with proper size filters than having a bigger size pond with insufficient filtration.


    All the best!
    Derrick

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