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Thread: Get her home or let her stay in japan?

  1. #1
    Nisai Dnn87's Avatar
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    Get her home or let her stay in japan?

    Been wondering if its worth to let my 2 step kohaku stay in japan for another season or get her home.

    We have pretty good growth facilities here, but I dont think it can compare to a mudpond.

    Do you think its worth to let her stay in japan or get her home?

    Does it have any other reasons to stay in japan other than it will grow faster in japan, but the end result should be the same?

    Please give me some for and against letting her stay in japan looking at the fish.

    Daugtherkoi of love queen
    59 cm
    1½ years old

    Thanks

    Get her home or let her stay in japan?-koi-2-2.jpg

  2. #2
    Oyagoi kingkong's Avatar
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    To me it would be more exciting to get updates and progress reports from Japan where the fish has the best chance to max out under best skilled care. Time goes by fast. Whats another year?
    Bring koi home and the thrill is tempered soon and attention will shift to the next koi you spotted in Japan.

  3. #3
    Nisai Dnn87's Avatar
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    Yes I understand. I just have that feeling "I really want to get it home and look at it everyday"
    And the fact that I might take it to koi show. Once it get in the higher sizes competition is huge.

    I hope for some good reasons to keep it in japan. What about skin quality? Some mudpond time could improve it even more (???)

  4. #4
    Daihonmei PapaBear's Avatar
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    I would go ahead and bring her home. If I was looking for one to leave in Japan for an extended time frame it would be with an eye toward entry in AJS. Otherwise, she has clearly demonstrated excellent growth capacity and testing your own skill to bring her along and enjoy is a pleasant challenge.

  5. #5
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    You recognize the positives for leaving her. The next year is an important one in her development and the mudpond will be best for her.

    The negatives are that mudponds are dangerous places. Bad things do happen. Another negative is shipping risk. The larger a koi grows, the risk of injury through inept cargo workers dropping boxes and rough handling increases. She is already a good size. If she reaches, say 68-70cm, it will be quite a heavy box for an hourly worker to be shoving around. Then, there is acclimation risk. The older a koi becomes, the less adaptable they are to changes in conditions. Nisai are just about the perfect age for adaptability. The weakness of tosai is in the past and the fish is not mature. Question: Are you working through a dealer with facilities suitable for acclimating a larger koi without crowding? And, is the dealer willing to do so? Most hobbyists lack the facilities themselves, and a typical quarantine tank is not a good place for an extended stay by a large fish. So, if facilities to handle a larger koi are not available, there is another reason to bring her home sooner.

    Personally, unless I was going over to see her brought out of the mud next Fall, I would bring her home now. If I was going there, I would be tempted to leave her just because of the added excitement of seeing your own koi come out of the mud.

  6. #6
    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
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    I'd bring her home for a number of reasons. The primary one is that I don't buy into the concept that hobbiests outside of Japan can't match their mudpond growth. I know too many that can. And if one can't, then it's time they challenged themselves to find out why.
    In both my favorite hobbies, bonsai and koi, many top show pieces in japan are handled by top professionals. They are paid a fee for their services and the owner readily accepts the rewards. Most places elsewhere in this world, the responsibility more than likely rests with the owner.
    Hands on responsibility is the best learning tool I know. In my opinion, some of the best instruction on how to accomplish growth has been penned by Mike Snaden of Yume Koi. google him and read some of his articles that have been published in magazines distributed thruout europe, the UK and the states.
    Good luck, and Let us know what you decide
    Dick Benbow

  7. #7
    Nisai Dnn87's Avatar
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    My koi dealers private growth tanks are open for me to use. He's a friend of mine. and we definately have some pretty good facilities. And thats why I feel I want to get her home and grow her myself. I wanted to hear for and against it.

    But looks like most of you see no problem in me taking it home. And I must admit that is what I want to.

    The koi was bought as "Jumbo" tosai on the SFF auction and when I saw how it developted I bought it right away at "jumbo tosai price" So I'm very very happy with this koi and as always want to get the full potential out of her

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