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Thread: Interview with Shigeru Mano, Dainichi Koi Farm.

  1. #1
    Nisai
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    Interview with Shigeru Mano, Dainichi Koi Farm.

    Part I - Bram Rohaan from Koi Question Interviews Shigeru Mano, who is the Managing Director of Dainichi Koi Farm.

    Koi TV Blog.


  2. #2
    Tategoi powerman's Avatar
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    good interview...thanks for posting it.....

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    Oyagoi HEADACHE6's Avatar
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    I'm surprised with the lack of Sanke production.

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    Quote Originally Posted by HEADACHE6 View Post
    I'm surprised with the lack of Sanke production.
    I don't think it's a lack of sanke productions, but I think it's very difficult to produce good sankes. Also I think the demand for sankes are not as popular as showas and kohaks.

    So instead of putting more time on breeding sankes, Dainichi use their ponds for what they are mainly known for their showas and now kohakus.

    With only 2 oyagoi sankes it's very difficult to find a good Dainichi Sanke. Some of us are so lucky.

    YouTube - tcuduc's Channel

    And some are us are soooo much luckier.

    YouTube - Southernflounder's Channel

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    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
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    I love sanke. It's my favorite. they are hard to find and a good one is never inexpensive.

    I enjoyed the video and feel Mano-san's focus on Kaizan (daily improvement) is not only applicable to breeders but also koi keepers.
    When you think you've arrived, your left behind....

  6. #6
    Oyagoi HEADACHE6's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4TEXAS View Post
    I don't think it's a lack of sanke productions, but I think it's very difficult to produce good sankes. Also I think the demand for sankes are not as popular as showas and kohaks.

    So instead of putting more time on breeding sankes, Dainichi use their ponds for what they are mainly known for their showas and now kohakus.

    For the Size of Dainichi as a Breeder it seemed small to me (Two Oyagoi).

    But I understand that Showa & Kohaku are what the People want when they Think Dainichi.

  7. #7
    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
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    my understanding is that daiinichi lost some of it's sanke oyagoi this past year to the extreme heat in the mud ponds which won't help the situation either. I'm not sure about the kato sanke, but pretty sure hotaru is no longer. So that means that sons and daughters will have to come into play.
    I really don't think the use of just two pairs is because of non interest,
    but because of the difficulty to get something worthwhile.....

  8. #8
    Oyagoi
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    Its been interesting to watch Shigeru progress from a young college boy in Houston to the position he holds in a multi-million dollar operation now. I've no doubt he is the world class fish farmer his father was, maybe even better.

    You must remember the huge amount of space it takes to hold the fry from spawning. In showa, the fry are culled at three days of age, prior to going to the rearing pond. Only about 30% are reared, this means that you can use 3 times as many brood fish for the same amount of rearing space. Increases your odds and lowers your cost greatly.

    Also remember this saying...."Sanke breeders go broke or crazy, usually both."

    The space needed for the fry from 2 sanke brooders is the same space you'd use for 6 showa brooders. Add to that the yeild from showa is better than from sanke anyhow, and you see that it makes a lot more financial sense to breed more showa and less sanke. Still, I much prefer sanke to showa.

    Interesting interview, I've asked Shigeru many of the same questions over the years.
    Brett

  9. #9
    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
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    Brett, always a pleasure to get your insight.....

    We have similar experiences, as i got to know kentaro Sakai while he was up here in the seattle area for two years. They had a Shiro utsuri who only produced about 27% black fry but the few she had were so high class, they always kept her because of the less expense for most yield. After all, besides color variety passions, it is a business

  10. #10
    Nisai
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fishbreeder View Post
    Its been interesting to watch Shigeru progress from a young college boy in Houston to the position he holds in a multi-million dollar operation now. I've no doubt he is the world class fish farmer his father was, maybe even better.

    You must remember the huge amount of space it takes to hold the fry from spawning. In showa, the fry are culled at three days of age, prior to going to the rearing pond. Only about 30% are reared, this means that you can use 3 times as many brood fish for the same amount of rearing space. Increases your odds and lowers your cost greatly.

    Also remember this saying...."Sanke breeders go broke or crazy, usually both."

    The space needed for the fry from 2 sanke brooders is the same space you'd use for 6 showa brooders. Add to that the yeild from showa is better than from sanke anyhow, and you see that it makes a lot more financial sense to breed more showa and less sanke. Still, I much prefer sanke to showa.

    Interesting interview, I've asked Shigeru many of the same questions over the years.
    I thought it was reverse. What I was thinking was, it is expesive to raise Showa than Sanke from frys. Showas are hard to predict the quality and pattern. So the culling becomes difficult and that makes many frys left behind during culling which inturn eats the space of the pond. Thank you for your insight. It made me think a little bit.

    I was surprised to hear that they have around 200 mud ponds and they manage all(both locations Niigata and Toyota) with 12 staffs. It was an interesting interview.

    I heard this interview at least 30 times to add English subtitle. Each and evey time I hear him talking, I can see his spirit towards breeding Dainichi koi and the passion in breeding koi. It's an art.

    Thanks,
    Antony.
    Phone : 1 (855) KOI FISH

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