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Thread: Rotary Drum Filtration, is it the future of mechanical filtration?

  1. #11
    Jumbo
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    Quote Originally Posted by kntry View Post
    DH and I are trying to figure out how to DIY one right now. If I could afford to buy one, it would definitely be part of my filtration but they're just too expensive for the average person to afford.

    If you will pull out your July/August 2008 Volume 33 Issue 1 on page 62, Stephen Castel has a very detailed article complete with illustrations, pictures, parts list, and how to assemble.

  2. #12
    Daihonmei
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    I think it was about 12 years ago now that I said on NI that the next frontier was in organic material removal as it is the 'beginning; of all issues in a closed system. This problem brought us the sump, the vortex, the answer and a dozen variations such as the sieve and borrow separator.

    As Brett said, the rotary drum concept has been around aquaculture since the 1950s and was in regular use in the 1970s an 80s. Usually expense was the issue as was maintenance and repair. Truly a professional kit in both the good ways and the bad ways.

    The problem with a closed system, something else I tend to preach a lot about, is the reality that once life is placed into a closed off self contained body of water, 'things' build up in the water and other 'things' begin to be used up and decline.
    The biological processes involved here are mineralization, nitrification, denitrification, particalization and the buffering bicarb system.

    So as important as the removal of organics is, realize that removing organics only eliminates the mineralization process, and takes some load off of the nitrification process and buffering system.

    In the end, ALL organic and inorganic byproduct will result in ever higher levels of nitrAtes.
    this is way the water change is the thing that is THE most important way to keep water quality high. It is not the prefiltration, the bio reactor or the chemical asist that is the ultimate thing-- it is the water change... JR

    P.S. there will be an three part series on closed systems and water changes in the new year's publication of ZNA's Nichirin for those interested in an indepth discussion of this subject. Included will be a simple high impact method of reducing nitrAte levels with less water to achieve truly low nitrAte levels and therefore the elimination of blanket weed and other built up pollution ( never published before in the koi literature).

  3. #13
    Oyagoi kingkong's Avatar
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    That is one fancy mouse trap.

    Diagram shows 60 micron range in green.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Rotary Drum Filtration, is it the future of mechanical filtration?-micron-60.jpg  

  4. #14
    Nisai Scrmnkg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricshaw View Post
    A mechanical filter that cost $2595.00 is "an affordable cost for the smaller pond"?

    I will keep an open-mind and look forward to reports back from other's experiences and reviews.
    Thanks Ric for at least keeping an "open mind". As it has been preached our ponds are a "system" and as such need to be looked at as a whole.
    This "system" approach needs to be looked at when constructing a pond as well. Things like space availability, installation cost, performance, operational expenses and maintanance.

    Given we only have so much time in this life, my time has value. If you consider the time it takes to flush and rinse out settlement chambers and clean S/G filters or what ever you use for fines control ie...mats it will take about an hour of your time each week(min.). At $25.00/hr, the cleaning time adds up to $1300/yr.

    Because the RDF is not 100% maintanance free and cleaning the drum of bio-film is required, considering an hour a month for that, $1300/yr-$300/yr your at a $1000/yr savings in time spent cleaning your filters alone, not to mention the other parts of the "system".

  5. #15
    Nisai Scrmnkg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flounder View Post
    Wish I had one to play with to see how well it does in a high load koi pond with high feeding.

    A couple of concerns for me:

    I see a lot of parts for this unit both mechanical & electrical. Guess what happens when any of them break down? There are a full range of parts available in the USA for quick and easy shipping.

    As w/ any new software, instruments, cars, devices etc that are 1st available to the public, I tend to wait & see & have others use it and have the manufacturer work out the kinks b/f I get one.

    Didn't IBM say that to Bill Gates years ago.........How'd that work out?

    Anyone still using the "Pond Sieve" from EA?
    There are many of these filters used in Europe, the importer to the US has been using one for over a year now to test it.

  6. #16
    Daihonmei
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrmnkg View Post
    There are many of these filters used in Europe, the importer to the US has been using one for over a year now to test it.

    but he's new hobbyist right? JR

  7. #17
    Nisai Scrmnkg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasPR View Post
    but he's new hobbyist right? JR

    No disrespect intended JR, but what relevance does your question have to do with the thread?

  8. #18
    Oyagoi
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrmnkg View Post
    No disrespect intended JR, but what relevance does your question have to do with the thread?
    Generally speaking, advanced hobbyist's opinions carry a great deal more weight.

    For myself, I'd like to know about the system this thing has been tried on. Number of gallons, amount of fish, clarity of water, water chemistry, etc.

    I am and work as an aquatic biologist, and such things interest me. JR is also a classically trained biologist although he works at something else, and he's into that stuff also.

    We need more than a video from a work bench and a sales pitch to be convinced of the efficacy of the newest and latest hobby gadgetry adapted from old style aquaculture devices.

    I do tend to buy every snake oil that comes down the pike, though. I like gadgets too.
    Brett

  9. #19
    Daihonmei
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrmnkg View Post
    No disrespect intended JR, but what relevance does your question have to do with the thread?
    no disrespect taken, and do understand that I'm not interested in getting into a debate as to the merits if an established prefiltration concept. And I'm certainly not going to fight with the fans of a new piece of kit as the introduction of the spinning vortex, the fluidized bed, the bacteria house, the answer unit and a few more had every newbie excited and many rushed out to buy the units immediately. Only to find out later on that heaven was still not on earth.
    Indeed I spent four hours seated with the importer discussing koi and pond design in general. VERY nice guy with a working understanding of pond filtration. But very early on in the hobby and quite innocent about some of the things he will undoubtedly learn over the next few years.

    In the end there will always be a market for new equipment for the 30 something male hobbyist to add to the daisy chain of hooked on equipment. It is at the heart of the hobby fun actually. So no problem there.
    I purposely placed a post a few posts back to try and put all these things into perspective. I did this knowing full well that the excitement of a new kit and the desire to have solutions to existing problems would cause that post to go right over the heads of the enthusists of new. That's Ok too.
    But somewhere over the 'techniological rainbow' is the big picture understanding of the koi pond environment, the causes of problems and the actual solutions. It doesn't come in a box and it doesn't plug in. It is an approach based on the realities of a closed system. And not based on a bottle, an additive, an oxidation compound or 'bestest' technology.
    Something to think about anyway? Peace, JR

  10. #20
    Oyagoi kntry's Avatar
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    Anyone that thinks they can install all the gadgets and totally walk away from ongoing maintenance of the water is fooling themselves. It won't take long for them to find out it doesn't work that way.

    Actually, I enjoy the maintenance and cleaning but then, I'm OCD and a workaholic.

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