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Thread: Rotary Drum Filtration, is it the future of mechanical filtration?

  1. #1
    Nisai Scrmnkg's Avatar
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    Rotary Drum Filtration, is it the future of mechanical filtration?

    It just might be!

    As the West Coast Dealer for Koi Collection USA, I got my hands on a couple KC-10 RDF's today and set up a little testing.

    The KC-10 is the smallest of the KC series and will flow about 3900gph with the 60micron screen.

    What say you?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdzATPKVYqw


    P.S. If someone can give me the run down on embedding videos here that would be great!

  2. #2
    Oyagoi kntry's Avatar
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    DH and I are trying to figure out how to DIY one right now. If I could afford to buy one, it would definitely be part of my filtration but they're just too expensive for the average person to afford.

  3. #3
    Oyagoi gcuss's Avatar
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    Very cool. Wish I could afford one.

    The YouTube thing.... When you go to the you tube page with your video on it this is in the address bar - www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdzATPKVYqw

    The bolded section is the video ID. When creating the post, click the red "Tube" button. You'll get two tags that are a YT and /YT with the square brackets around them. Copy and paste the bolded section from the you tube address page inside the [yt] things. Voila!




    Grant

  4. #4
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrmnkg View Post
    It just might be!
    As the West Coast Dealer for Koi Collection USA, I got my hands on a couple KC-10 RDF's today and set up a little testing.
    The KC-10 is the smallest of the KC series and will flow about 3900gph with the 60micron screen.
    What say you?
    YouTube - Rotary Drum Filter (RDF) in action from Bridge Way Koi
    I did not think that was much "debris" in the demo.
    I will wait for independent real world tests on outside ponds.

    Quote Originally Posted by Scrmnkg View Post
    P.S. If someone can give me the run down on embedding videos here that would be great!
    When you 'click-on' the "Tube" icon insert the part of the YouTube URL after the equal sign.
    This --> "HdzATPKVYqw"


  5. #5
    Oyagoi
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    Interesting video. Although its been many years ago, I worked with several similar devices with respect to intensive aquaculture recirc systems. They worked fairly well in some respects but were problematic in others.

    The devices worked at removing particulates down to a point, but tended to pass colloidal suspensions right through (cloudy water). In systems where salt was added from time to time we had problems with the stainless mesh screens on the drums corroding (forming large holes and bypassing solids). Another problem was that a biofilm would sometimes form on the screens necessitating treatment with chlorine, ozone or other sterilants from time to time to keep them from becoming clogged. The other problem was that the units tended to use a lot of water for the screen cleaning process necessitating a great deal more of make up water.

    Now these things were much larger, commercial units and they were pretty much cost prohibitive for commercial ventures. They were more useful in government funded hatcheries with gigantic budgets and no profit motives.

    The best uses we found were not for cleaning recirc water, rather for preventing unwanted egg and fry introduction with intake water and for the removal of some of the suspended solids from waste water prior to disposal. However, we got similar results by using micron socks on the intake water and settlement ponds on the waste water. A tad more labor intensive but several orders of magnitude cheaper in setup and material costs. The ones I worked with cost from around $50K to well over $200K each depending on size.

    I could see where such a unit might be useful in a koi pond, but it would have to treat a lot more water for ponds of any size and not be prone to clogging with biofilms or use much water for cleaning the screen. Cost is also an issue, not sure how much they might cost. Longevity is another problem, if the device were very costly it would have to work trouble free for many years. None of the ones I ever worked with lasted very long before having problems of one sort or another.

    I'd like to see how the device works in a real world application outside the workshop before passing judgement. Could be the cat's meow or the dog's bite.

    Brett
    Brett

  6. #6
    Nisai Scrmnkg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kntry View Post
    DH and I are trying to figure out how to DIY one right now. If I could afford to buy one, it would definitely be part of my filtration but they're just too expensive for the average person to afford.
    I recently did a comparison on an 8000gal. pond that someone was building with 2-275gal totes, 3-pumps, 2-S/G filters and a 4-tray shower set up. They are using the totes until they can change to Cetus'.

    Using a KC-30, which flows 7895gph with a 40 micron screen (11840gph with 60 micron), if they eliminate the eventual Cetus', 2-pumps and the S/G's it would only be an additional $425.00(approx.), this doesn't take into account the additional valves and piping they will need for their proposed set-up. Add to that the savings in construction costs by building a smaller filter pit, the reduction in operating costs with fewer pumps and the reduced maintanance time involved are they really that expensive.

  7. #7
    Nisai Scrmnkg's Avatar
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    Thanks Grant & Ric for the instruction, I hope I can remember it for next time.

    Ric.......I still have this demo set up, how about you tell me how much to throw in. That debris is actual waste from the vortex of my Nexus, in other words it's real fish $hit! And it's been run through a couple times so it's now even finer.
    Last edited by Scrmnkg; 03-30-2011 at 02:02 AM. Reason: spelling

  8. #8
    Nisai Scrmnkg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fishbreeder View Post
    Interesting video. Although its been many years ago, I worked with several similar devices with respect to intensive aquaculture recirc systems. They worked fairly well in some respects but were problematic in others.

    The devices worked at removing particulates down to a point, but tended to pass colloidal suspensions right through (cloudy water). In systems where salt was added from time to time we had problems with the stainless mesh screens on the drums corroding (forming large holes and bypassing solids). Another problem was that a biofilm would sometimes form on the screens necessitating treatment with chlorine, ozone or other sterilants from time to time to keep them from becoming clogged. The other problem was that the units tended to use a lot of water for the screen cleaning process necessitating a great deal more of make up water.

    Now these things were much larger, commercial units and they were pretty much cost prohibitive for commercial ventures. They were more useful in government funded hatcheries with gigantic budgets and no profit motives.

    The best uses we found were not for cleaning recirc water, rather for preventing unwanted egg and fry introduction with intake water and for the removal of some of the suspended solids from waste water prior to disposal. However, we got similar results by using micron socks on the intake water and settlement ponds on the waste water. A tad more labor intensive but several orders of magnitude cheaper in setup and material costs. The ones I worked with cost from around $50K to well over $200K each depending on size.

    I could see where such a unit might be useful in a koi pond, but it would have to treat a lot more water for ponds of any size and not be prone to clogging with biofilms or use much water for cleaning the screen. Cost is also an issue, not sure how much they might cost. Longevity is another problem, if the device were very costly it would have to work trouble free for many years. None of the ones I ever worked with lasted very long before having problems of one sort or another.

    I'd like to see how the device works in a real world application outside the workshop before passing judgement. Could be the cat's meow or the dog's bite.

    Brett
    Brett, Thanks for your response, indeed RDF's have been around for a long time in the aquaculture industry. Koi Collection USA has made them affordable for the pond world.(more specs. & pricing at Rotary Drum Filters ). Making comparisons to commercial applications in this case is like apples and orange. I will say though it is recommended to periodically clean the drum of biofilm.(the tank has a drain for such occasions).

  9. #9
    Oyagoi Flounder's Avatar
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    Wish I had one to play with to see how well it does in a high load koi pond with high feeding.

    A couple of concerns for me:

    I see a lot of parts for this unit both mechanical & electrical. Guess what happens when any of them break down?

    As w/ any new software, instruments, cars, devices etc that are 1st available to the public, I tend to wait & see & have others use it and have the manufacturer work out the kinks b/f I get one.

    Anyone still using the "Pond Sieve" from EA?

  10. #10
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrmnkg View Post
    Brett, Thanks for your response, indeed RDF's have been around for a long time in the aquaculture industry. Koi Collection USA has made them affordable for the pond world.(more specs. & pricing at Rotary Drum Filters ). Making comparisons to commercial applications in this case is like apples and orange. I will say though it is recommended to periodically clean the drum of biofilm.(the tank has a drain for such occasions).
    A mechanical filter that cost $2595.00 is "an affordable cost for the smaller pond"?

    I will keep an open-mind and look forward to reports back from other's experiences and reviews.

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