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Thread: large koi bleeding

  1. #1
    Oyagoi koifishgirl's Avatar
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    large koi bleeding

    Netting one of my large koi today and she bleed out some from her gills...not sure how much damage was done and wondering if she could die from this..she acts ok but when she tried to eat it was like she could not suck the food in her mouth...will never net another one of my large koi again..how stupid of me..she is around 28 inches and heavy with eggs..anyone ever had this happen and the koi live?

  2. #2
    Nisai Moneypit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by koifishgirl View Post
    Netting one of my large koi today and she bleed out some from her gills...not sure how much damage was done and wondering if she could die from this..she acts ok but when she tried to eat it was like she could not suck the food in her mouth...will never net another one of my large koi again..how stupid of me..she is around 28 inches and heavy with eggs..anyone ever had this happen and the koi live?

    Yes it has happend to me a few times with my larger koi, she should be ok.

  3. #3
    Tosai Smoker's Avatar
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    bleed from gills happens some times when netting large koi.
    some said it's sort of sign of stress. should be ok.

  4. #4
    Daihonmei
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    Good Morning, JR 'the broken record' here! I often write about koi as four season fish and this is one of those tells as just how koi change based on what time of year it is. If you followed the thread about internal changes and the ability of koi to direct growth to different areas depending on time of year, you can appreciate that your koi is cycling into growth as a breeder.
    The second point to be made here yet again is the fact that koi are ruled by temperature, light and diet and this triggers their biological clock. The 'clock's workings' is the endocrine system. And as hormones surge throughout the fish's body, changes occur in the tissues of their body.
    The gill structure, where all exchange between the outside world and the inside of the koi occurs is also affected by this dynamic. As is the general osmotic balance. So exertion is to be avoided at this time of year (this is why the Japanese avoid koi shows this time of year).
    The bleeding itself is no more serious than a bloody nose in a human, but it is an indication of many other changes in the koi that are not so unimportant. So yes, adult gravid females moved this time of year can have difficulties beyond a simple bloody gill. Internal hemorrhage is a possibility in the big girls. It is probably best not to net big gravid females this time of year. If you must net them, do not lift them out of the water as this will blow a gill layer and bleeding will occur. You will notice that your female koi are very ‘feisty’ this time of year and once the dullness of winter leave them, they are quite sensitive to stimulation of any kind. The response is to jump, twist and fight a net! Many an anal fin ray and dorsal ray will be broken this time of year in a net. And koi launching out of ponds is also a higher probability this time of year. In the wild, the rains will soon be coming and the flood zones will cover plants and grasses along the banks of rivers and ponds and flood zones. This is the carp’s natural habitat for spawning. And although carp don’t make a salmon like journey to specific spawning grounds, they do school up and search for these sites to spawn against. This means that nature must give them that energy and drive to fight current, water conditions and survive the rigors of the spawning act itself. And many a females dies from the effort.
    So be sensitive to the condition of gravid female koi and don’t move them too much this time of year. If you do, take precautions. Good equipment, never out of water, correct netting technique and proper bowls all go a long way towards having to lasting damage other than a gill bleed. JR

  5. #5
    Oyagoi Eugeneg's Avatar
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    Excellent post post JR. I would like to add that one should look and familiarize oneself with the gills
    of a healthy fish so that it is easier to spot the gills of a fish where the gills are covered with mucus or damaged.
    Regards
    Eugene

  6. #6
    Tosai
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by JasPR View Post
    Good Morning, JR 'the broken record' here! I often write about koi as four season fish and this is one of those tells as just how koi change based on what time of year it is. If you followed the thread about internal changes and the ability of koi to direct growth to different areas depending on time of year, you can appreciate that your koi is cycling into growth as a breeder.
    The second point to be made here yet again is the fact that koi are ruled by temperature, light and diet and this triggers their biological clock. The 'clock's workings' is the endocrine system. And as hormones surge throughout the fish's body, changes occur in the tissues of their body.
    The gill structure, where all exchange between the outside world and the inside of the koi occurs is also affected by this dynamic. As is the general osmotic balance. So exertion is to be avoided at this time of year (this is why the Japanese avoid koi shows this time of year).
    The bleeding itself is no more serious than a bloody nose in a human, but it is an indication of any other changes in the koi that are not so unimportant. So yes, adult gravid females moved this time of year can have difficulties beyond a simply bloody gill. Internal hemorrhage is a possibility in the big girls. It is probably best not to net big gravid females this time of year. If you must net them, do not lift them out of the water as this will blow a gill layer and bleeding will occur. You will notice that your female koi are very ‘feisty’ this time of year and once the dullness of winter leave them, they are quite sensitive to stimulation of any kind. The response is to jump, twist and fight a net! Many an anal fin ray and dorsal ray will be broken this time of year in a net. And koi launching out of ponds is also a higher probability this time of year. In the wild, the rains will soon be coming and the flood zones will cover plants and grasses along the banks of rivers and ponds and flood zones. This is the carp’s natural habitat for spawning. And although carp don’t make a salmon like journey to specific spawning grounds, they do school up and search for these sites to spawn against. This means that nature must give them that energy and drive to fight current, water conditions and survive the rigors of the spawning act itself. And many a females dies from the effort.
    So be sensitive to the condition of gravid female koi and don’t move them too much this time of year. If you do, take precautions. Good equipment, never out of water, correct netting technique and proper bowls all go a long way towards having to lasting damage other than a gill bleed. JR
    This should be stickied somewhere so as not to lose it.
    Excellent post.

  7. #7
    Daihonmei
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bindi View Post
    This should be stickied somewhere so as not to lose it.
    Excellent post.
    Good morning, very pleased you found it helpful. In ZNA ( the first koi fanciers club in the world- formed in Japan in 1960s) we try to give education regarding koi as unique pieces of living art, but also as domesticated versions of wild carp. In this perspective, you will understand the nature and the challenges of koi carp in our closed systems. Just because we have taken the wild carp out of nature it does not mean that we have taken 'nature' out of the koi. Its physiology, its nature as a four season creature living outside, and its behavior/ response to its environment are still all very much intact in this colorful carp.
    I will put the post on the ZNA blog as a permanent article. znaamerica.org and then click on blog button. JR

  8. #8
    Tosai
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    Much appreciated JR.

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