Home | About Us | Contact Us


Koi Forum - Koi-Bito Magazine straight from Japan
Page 14 of 24 FirstFirst ... 41213141516 ... LastLast
Results 131 to 140 of 235
Like Tree12Likes

Thread: Water Changes

  1. #131
    Tategoi Loco4Koi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    382
    I hooked up a garden hose inline water softener. Attached to that a 25psi pressure regulator. I have a 1/2" irrigation hose running from the pressure regulator to a regulated 25 gallons per hour irrigation emitter. This sits in my bog and runs down the falls into the pond. That gives me just over 10% a day fresh water. For dechlorination I toss a small handful of ST in every day plus the occasional addition os Seachem Safe for the hell of it. The water exits the pond via a bulkhead through my liner with a 1" pvc skirting my house to the front, just below the visible grass line. I drilled a hole just below ground into the 6" cleanout in front. So far no problems, but I do worry about possible overdosing ST or Safe...
    I wanted to drill a well, which is legal and loosely regulated in Austin, but I live above the aquifer recharge zone. One of the few areas where it is illegal.
    I'm interested in one of those whole house dechlorination systems using catalytic carbon by pure water products in denton. They have a a whole house system for chloramine The Chloramine Catcher, wholehouse chloramine and chemical removal – Pure Water Products, LLC

    I'm open for opinions on my trickle through system.... also opinions on the system by pure water products for chloramine... it is my understanding, Austin skirts the legal maximum limits for chloramine,, so it is definitely a concern.

  2. #132
    Tategoi hewhoisatpeace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pendleton, SC
    Posts
    331
    I think the concern for overdosing Safe or ST is not needed, they do not cause harm that I'm aware of. The possible exception to that is when using PP to treat water, as either product will neutralize PP rapidly and effectively.

  3. #133
    Tosai
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    42
    From an old post I have bookmarked by Roddy Conrad (just FYI):

    "A gross overcharge of sodium thiosulfate can and has killed ponds of fish, but it was a gross overcharge, a 50 pound bag dumped in a 2000 gallon tank of fish. The sodium thiosulfate itself is not toxic even at that gross overcharge, but the decomposition products of sodium thiosulfate in pond water is toxic to fish at gross overcharge levels. So if sodium thiosulfate is grossly overcharged, the fish start dying about 3 days later when the decomposition of the gross overcharge peaks in concentration."

  4. #134
    Tategoi hewhoisatpeace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pendleton, SC
    Posts
    331
    Exactly. Not a valid concern, unless you're dumping 50 pound bags in the pond.

  5. #135
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    11,128
    There has been discussion on another board about whether to use dechlorinator when dumping the settlement chamber. In the case of one pondkeeper, dumping settlement amounted to a 3% water change.

    It is not uncommon for people to think it is not necessary to dechlorinate when a relatively small amount of chlorinated water is being added to the pond. I think the best practice is to always dechlorinate. But, I would admit that if I was just adding a small amount of water to top off due to evaporation, I probably would not bother to dechlorinate. If I had a slow leak and had to top up daily, I would make the little effort involved and dechlorinate. In the case of dumping settlement daily, at 3% per day, you would be changing out 20% of the pond weekly. I would use dechlorinator.

    I do not really understand why folks skimp on dechlorinator. ST is so cheap when purchased in bulk. Even if you have a track record of not killing your koi when doing water changes without use of dechlorinator, I have to ask: Is that your standard for sound koikeeping? Something is OK as long as you do not kill or cause permanent injury to your koi? That chlorine is indiscriminately oxidizing all organics it contacts, including the mucus coat of the koi, their gill filaments... everything. The chlorine may be used up before a koi dies or suffers permanent injury, but it sure didn't do anything good to the fish. Now, as Roddy Conrad teaches in his posts early in this thread, if your water is soft with a neutral pH and in direct sun, the chlorine is going to de-gas much more quickly than if your pond has a pH of 7.5 (or higher) and is in the shade. Still, why take a chance? Dechlor is really cheap, so use it. Doing a daily water change without dechlor, even if small, adds up. IMO, a 'little chlorine' every day is sort of the opposite of 'an apple a day'.

    Some folks cannot use cheap ST alone. They have to use the more costly water conditioners that neutralize metals. For them, the cost does add up. But, if the source water contains copper or other heavy metals, you really do need to treat every gallon to keep your koi safe.

    ...Nothing like water changes to get me on a rant.

  6. #136
    Jumbo Appliance Guy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Pensacola, FL
    Posts
    754
    Quote Originally Posted by JasPR View Post
    Mike, as I said previously, this is a great thread and you have made the very best of posts. But I fear now you are moving away from the big picture with this example.

    we all agree that water changes are the method that brings water back to the ideal base line parameters where koi can operate and grow uneffected by outside negative factors of pollution , gas imbalance, pH decline, hormonal feedback and mineral interference.

    But The water change is also the demarcation line between open systems and closed systems. This is important because this is the moment where systems change in regard to the level of microbal dependency. THIS is the real point of equilibrium. The balance between fish and microbe is what makes for the rate of deterioration and exhaustion fo water.

    So I would not call the water change a point of equilibrium without making it clear that 'equilibrium' is a term meant to describe the relationship between fish mass and microbes. And water changes return parameters to ideal base line readings. - JR
    JR nailed it. This is so critical to understand.

    On a recent post I saw a pond that made me think of JR's 'living water' concept, to which I subscribe to. You'll see in this pond what I would consider 'spent water'. Koi Pond in La réunion Island

    This thread has been mostly about how to dechlorinate tap water. I think the greater point that was missed is recognizing that water has certain properties that once spent, cannot be recovered. Fresh water has LIFE, that once dies- is gone. It's truely is living water. I see people use all kinds of filtration and creative ways to purify the water. But I know that there is no way to revive water once it's dead. In a koi pond setting, the only thing to do is exchange spent water with fresh water. Sorry folks, but no amount of anoxic filters, drum filters, showers, mud, PP, or any biological, mechanical, or chemical filtration will give spent water the properties that fresh water has. Once life dies is gone, it's gone.

  7. #137
    Oyagoi yerrag's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Manila, Philippines
    Posts
    1,792
    I agree, but what is living water? Offhand, I can define it by stating what it isn't.

    It isn't water that's been microwaved. Plants watered with water that's been microwaved show severely stunted growth. We don't microwave pond water for our pond for sure, but this shows simply how "water is not just water," as some would view water as simply being material.

    It isn't recycled water, especially water recycled from sewage, even if it's been distilled. As I understand it, Singapore recycles water this way. But it is used for washing and for flushing. Not for drinking.

    Many proponents of restructured water consider it to be living water. In nature, living water comes from water that has gone through a series of flows that involve it undergoing vortices. This could be through underground or subterranean flows, seeping thru sediments, pebbles, rocks, boulders, or through winding rivers and streams. Water is recharged and restructured, making it more readily absorbed by living things - a property caled hydration. Such water also carries with it trace minerals without which vital life processes are restricted.

    In a closed pond setting, it is hard to recreate nature's act of revitalizing water that has been spent. Refreshing pond water with new water is always good. Finding the right amount of new water water to replace spent water daily is the tricky part. How tricky? Just ask the folks in California. They now face more water use restriction than ever, with the no-April Fool's law passed by Jerry Brown.

  8. #138
    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    seattle, wa
    Posts
    6,340
    I had a similar thread going on a bonsai forum about california's new water restrictions. Some really good suggestions emerged but eventually politics got into the mix and the thread was moved to the lounge. Just in case we have others besides myself who have interest in both Koi and bonsai, I thought the best suggestion was to emmerse the pot into a water filled container as opposed to using a watering can and allowing the water to flow thru and out to the ground, thus wasting the resource.

    With Koi, there doesn't seem to be any such alternative. Fresh water is needed by all user groups ( fish, bacteria etc)...It may very well be worth looking hard at your pond residents for elimination in the user group. Less demand makes for longer water life.

    I hadn't heard about microwaved water and plants. I have been a believer with koi that running pond water over and over thru carbon (charcoal) helps to extend it's life...
    Dick Benbow

  9. #139
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    2,653
    Quote Originally Posted by Appliance Guy View Post
    This thread has been mostly about how to dechlorinate tap water. I think the greater point that was missed is recognizing that water has certain properties that once spent, cannot be recovered. Fresh water has LIFE, that once dies- is gone. It's truely is living water. I see people use all kinds of filtration and creative ways to purify the water. But I know that there is no way to revive water once it's dead. In a koi pond setting, the only thing to do is exchange spent water with fresh water. Sorry folks, but no amount of anoxic filters, drum filters, showers, mud, PP, or any biological, mechanical, or chemical filtration will give spent water the properties that fresh water has. Once life dies is gone, it's gone.
    I see fresh chlorinated tap water as dead water. True living water can support biological filtration. The problem with our closed pond systems and why the need to replace pond water with new water is the fact that water is an excellent solvent and it is very hard to remove dissolved contaminants.

  10. #140
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    11,128
    Bumping up for Cab.

Page 14 of 24 FirstFirst ... 41213141516 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 06-11-, 03:43 PM
  2. add water conditioner when changer water
    By thanhsonnguyen in forum Main Forum
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 03-04-2012, 11:21 AM
  3. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-25-2010, 09:39 AM
  4. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-10-2009, 09:22 AM
  5. Water Test to proove its not pond water
    By gregbickal in forum Main Forum
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 05-28-2009, 12:12 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Articles - Sitemap - FAQs and Rules

KB Footer Graphic
Straight from Japan... For the serious hobbyist!
All content and images copyright of: Koi-bito.com