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Thread: Mechanical Filtration: Radial Flow Separator

  1. #1
    Oyagoi Lam Nguyen's Avatar
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    Mechanical Filtration: Radial Flow Separator

    Has any of you used a radial flow separator for mechanical filtration? If so, what is your opinion on it?

    Below is a pretty good read on this type of solid separator:

    http://www.w-m-t.com/library/pdf/Rad...Whitepaper.pdf

    Google search shows the following links:

    Aquacare Radial Flow Separator Aquacare Environment Inc.

    Radial Flow Separators |

    It seems that there are so many types of mechanical filtration to choose from that the task can be daunting. There are J brushes, vortex swirl separators, rotator drum filters, sieves, sand and gravel filtration and anything else that we could think of that would trap solids. Obvious some are better than others and some are maintenance free while some will require that we suit up our raingear and pull out our pressure washer once daily.

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    MCA
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    Oyagoi MCA's Avatar
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    Another dynamic....cost. For example, ever price a RDF?

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    Daihonmei
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lam Nguyen View Post
    Has any of you used a radial flow separator for mechanical filtration? If so, what is your opinion on it?

    Below is a pretty good read on this type of solid separator:

    http://www.w-m-t.com/library/pdf/Rad...Whitepaper.pdf

    Google search shows the following links:

    Aquacare Radial Flow Separator � Aquacare Environment Inc.

    Radial Flow Separators |

    It seems that there are so many types of mechanical filtration to choose from that the task can be daunting. There are J brushes, vortex swirl separators, rotator drum filters, sieves, sand and gravel filtration and anything else that we could think of that would trap solids. Obvious some are better than others and some are maintenance free while some will require that we suit up our raingear and pull out our pressure washer once daily.
    Can't use fluidized bed SAND filter in a koi pond. And I think this illustrates that you can study and research 'other industries and hobbies' solutions to their specific issues and specific species, but at the end of the day, koi in a back yard setting is a unique set of problems that requires it own solutions. There have been many man many ( did I mention 'many') filters and variations introduced in this hobby since the first real koi ppnd filters designed in Japan in 1968. The problems they addressed then are the very same problems we address now with varying levels of success. It comes down to two-- physical waste and waste byproducts of a macro description and 2) inorganic ammonia. I introduced a third in the 1990s with conversations regarding DOC content and ORP readings ( the seasonal ORP charts).

    As I stated back then, the #1 enemy of koi over the long term is not ammonia -- ammonia is a beginners problem and easily fixed. No koi pond should have measurable ammonia readings.
    But organics and their associates are always with us in a koi pond! And therefore any system that can reduce ( AND REMOVE- NOT hold and hide) are valuable. JR

  4. #4
    Oyagoi ricshaw's Avatar
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    I use a vortex with a static basket like Kent Wallace's



    If interested I could upload a short video of mine to YouTube.

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    Oyagoi ricshaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lam Nguyen View Post
    It seems that there are so many types of mechanical filtration to choose from that the task can be daunting. There are J brushes, vortex swirl separators, rotator drum filters, sieves, sand and gravel filtration and anything else that we could think of that would trap solids. Obvious some are better than others and some are maintenance free while some will require that we suit up our raingear and pull out our pressure washer once daily.
    I do not think you can beat a sieve like the UltraSieve III by AquaForte. I don't have one, but they look like the right ticket.

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    MCA
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    Oyagoi MCA's Avatar
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    Agreed. Hard to beat a sieve for small footprint, ease of maintenance, and separation capability, especially if you drop to 100micron screen.

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    Oyagoi Lam Nguyen's Avatar
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    It's interesting how when I talk to hobbyists who have used the sieve, most swear by them while there are a few who would prefer other types of mechanical filtration. The #1 complaint from those who dislike them was the 'sugar in a tea cup' effect. They believe that the solids get pounded at the bottom of the sieve and breaks down and returns to water column. On the contrary, solids in a swirl separator or radial separator just settles gently to the bottom of the vortex w/o being broken down. Yes, these solids sit in the vortex until drained but they do not get smashed and broken down by rapidly moving water.

    I have also heard that the 100 micron screen clogs up a lot, especially during heavy summer feeding period. Do any of you find this to be true.

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    MCA
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    Oyagoi MCA's Avatar
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    Do those who claim "the teabag effect" actually own and observe a sieve?

    If you want a teabag effect, let detritus pile up is static beds, stacks of matting, of in a bead filter. The only mechanical stages I can think of that take detritus out of circulation are sieves or RDFs.

  9. #9
    Tategoi hewhoisatpeace's Avatar
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    I am falling out of love with sieves, but not because they don't work. They do their work very well. They don't work without a pump, though. I'm looking into getting out of the pump idea, going with airlifts, which won't work with a sieve.

    I do run a 100 micron screen, though. I love it, I feel that it pulls tons more out of my system. If I used a 300 micron, I would pass most of the waste I collect. Small stuff is what I see. Clogging has never been a problem for me.
    Will Schultze
    (931) 338-6174



  10. #10
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lam Nguyen View Post
    It's interesting how when I talk to hobbyists who have used the sieve, most swear by them while there are a few who would prefer other types of mechanical filtration. The #1 complaint from those who dislike them was the 'sugar in a tea cup' effect. They believe that the solids get pounded at the bottom of the sieve and breaks down and returns to water column. On the contrary, solids in a swirl separator or radial separator just settles gently to the bottom of the vortex w/o being broken down. Yes, these solids sit in the vortex until drained but they do not get smashed and broken down by rapidly moving water.

    I have also heard that the 100 micron screen clogs up a lot, especially during heavy summer feeding period. Do any of you find this to be true.
    The 'dwell time' is the major factor if you go with a 'swirl separator' concept. Separation of solids is highest when the flow is lower, but that reduces the turnover rate.

    In my pond the bottom drains feed a settlement chamber, which in turn feeds Nexus filters. It works better than not having any physical separation prior to the Nexus units. But, I'd now rather have a sieve as the first step to get a higher capture rate with the flow rate I maintain. (Some would say no mechanical filtration is needed prior to a Nexus, because the static kaldnes in the central core is sufficient. However, it would then be an absolute necessity that I clean multiple times per week. I need for the system to be able to operate without my intervention for a week in case work or travel take me away. ...the frequency at which the filtration must be checked/maintained is often ignored when designing a new pond.)

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