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Thread: Some Thoughts, Please, On A Mud-Pond Opportunity

  1. #11
    Oyagoi dizzyfish's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S. Stone View Post
    "The fairly steep sides of the pond discourage 'wading' by these marauders. We think the depth might discourage that as well."

    Don't let the "steep sides" or the overall depth of any pond in NE Florida fool you. Unless you keep something like a guard dog on site, you definitely need extensive predator protection, such as fences or monofilament lines. Examples: A great blue heron's method of attack is to land on the ground near the pond, walk to any edge of the water and regurgitate whatever it has in its craw into the water. Koi, being the greedy feeders that they are, are all too eager to get within "striking distance" and the heron will "spear" the fish, eat the small ones and leave the larger ones dead or mortally wounded on the ground. The steepness of the sides and depth of the water make absolutely no difference, if the heron is able to get to the edge of the water. (I have recently had a modified "baby fence" installed near all edges of my pond. So far, so good.) A smaller bird, such as a kingfisher, will sit on any high point and dive into the water for the smaller fish. A friend I know, who once lost most of the result of a whole season's spawning, finally had success in stopping a kingfisher by securing a mouse or rat trap on the top of a nearby tall pole.
    Anyway, it sounds like an exciting endeavor. Good luck!

    S. Stone
    I wouldn't want to get caught with a kingfisher in a trap. You can get $100,000 fine and a year in jail for killing one.

  2. #12
    Nisai
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    On further reflection, I think the story of the "trap" was only imaginitive thinking, because, in actuality, the tosai pond was completely covered with hoops made of PVC and netting.

    S. Stone

  3. #13
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by S. Stone View Post
    "The fairly steep sides of the pond discourage 'wading' by these marauders. We think the depth might discourage that as well."
    They are smart... might use a fishing pole.

  4. #14
    Oyagoi Eugeneg's Avatar
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    1) The pond is at least 20 feet across, 50 feet long, and runs from 3.5 to 6 feet in depth. I estimate it very conservatively at 30,000 gal.

    The volume of water for a mud pond is far too small to sustain itself even with a small number of fish you should consider enlarging it as well as going deeper. Depth will give you temperature stability. Or consider some form of filtration
    Regards
    Eugene

  5. #15
    Oyagoi
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    i would think with your flow thru water you could be very stable and temps staying at 72 in florida even better

    question i would have is how reliable is the incoming water?
    always flowing same rain or drought time of year?

    seems you are a step ahead by knowing the pond can keep koi alive and doing well even if lower grade?
    even if low grade what do you see in the koi.good body? good growth? colors?

  6. #16
    Sansai almostgeorgia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pskorf View Post
    i would think with your flow thru water you could be very stable and temps staying at 72 in florida even better

    question i would have is how reliable is the incoming water?
    always flowing same rain or drought time of year?

    seems you are a step ahead by knowing the pond can keep koi alive and doing well even if lower grade?
    even if low grade what do you see in the koi.good body? good growth? colors?
    All good questions. First, it's an artesian well-fed pond, so water temp and quality 'characteristics', whatever they might be in terms of hardness, PH, etc., are constant. The pond has been in existence for over 30 years now, so no drop off in water availability expected. And again, from what I can see, the in-flow can be adjusted if high evaporation rates or drought conditions exist.

    As for the quality and condition of the pond grade fish in there, I can only go by what I can observe as they feed at the surface, and they look pretty fat and happy, though they've not been on any consistent high quality feed program either--just catfish chow! They have been reproducing as well, though I know that is not necessarily a sign of anything good or bad -- we all know koi will spawn like crazy even under some pretty lousy conditions.

    We will get a much better 'feel' for the quality of the fish already in the pond later this year. Our local koi club has been invited to do a pond harvest late this summer or early fall; we've been asked to seine every fish out of the pond after the water level has been drained down to a foot or so.

    The pond is in a beautiful, rural setting and we plan to make a day of it with a picnic and cook-out for our hosts. We're always looking for something fun and different for Club members to participate in, especially if it has anything to do with the subject of koi. Even if we never get to add a nice re-stocking of koi back into the pond just to see what might happen, a Japanese style pond-pull with all the kids and club members on a warm Florida day sounds like fun to me. And how many koi clubs can say they've participated in a koi pond harvest? A true koi-kichi experience if nothing else.

    Will keep everyone posted and attach some photos if we pull this off.....

  7. #17
    Oyagoi
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    any reason you are waiting?
    maybe you can do a pond pull now as mightbe easier to rehome the koi now.maybe even a dealer can help take extras for a club donation????
    and this is the time of year tosai are coming into the US now so chance maybe better for some nicer tosai? then waiting till fall

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