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Thread: Question about carpet algae

  1. #11
    Jumbo sacicu's Avatar
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    My pond is almost similar in volume with yours but cast in concrete. At present there is not much wall algae anymore since its been cloudy and raining lately. Likewise, the water is now very soft and not much minerals and nitrates in the water sustain growth of algae. At first, ive noticed for three months wall algae dying as i keep on seeing it on the brushes. Now, brushes are pretty free from the dying algae. the wall surface is pretty clean of it as well.

    IMO, there is a a correlation between your use of calcium bentonite, the PH of your water, and the population of your bacteria makeup with regards to how thick your wall algae is, and the amount of sunlight with regards to how thick your carpet algae will be.

    Calcium bentonite flocullares fines in the water and these fine gets trap in the wall algae which feeds on it for growth.
    The softer the Ph, the less minerals there is. Over time, bacterial population increase as the pond matures and the more bacteria compete for carbonates the thinner the wall algae becomes. UV also promotes wall algae while killing off green suspended algae becaue they compete for the same nutrients to grow. Of course sunlight is self explanatory.

  2. #12
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sacicu View Post
    My pond is almost similar in volume with yours but cast in concrete. At present there is not much wall algae anymore since its been cloudy and raining lately. Likewise, the water is now very soft and not much minerals and nitrates in the water sustain growth of algae. At first, ive noticed for three months wall algae dying as i keep on seeing it on the brushes. Now, brushes are pretty free from the dying algae. the wall surface is pretty clean of it as well.
    IMO, there is a a correlation between your use of calcium bentonite, the PH of your water, and the population of your bacteria makeup with regards to how thick your wall algae is, and the amount of sunlight with regards to how thick your carpet algae will be.
    Calcium bentonite flocullares fines in the water and these fine gets trap in the wall algae which feeds on it for growth.
    The softer the Ph, the less minerals there is. Over time, bacterial population increase as the pond matures and the more bacteria compete for carbonates the thinner the wall algae becomes. UV also promotes wall algae while killing off green suspended algae becaue they compete for the same nutrients to grow. Of course sunlight is self explanatory.
    I wonder if the age of the concrete walls would have an effect?

  3. #13
    Jumbo sacicu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricshaw View Post
    I wonder if the age of the concrete walls would have an effect?
    I dont think so. The concrete has been coated with three layers of two component epoxy concrete primer and two layer of black epoxy paint. There is no alkali leaching before when the pond was new.

  4. #14
    Tategoi mtsklar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Appliance Guy View Post
    Doesn't look like they test for copper... Approximately what range should I be concerned with? I am seeing test kits that are affordable that test range is 5- .05 (I assume ppm).
    Contact Norm Walsh, he has experience with it and can tell you the numbers.

  5. #15
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricshaw View Post
    I wonder if the age of the concrete walls would have an effect?
    My concrete is not coated with epoxy paint and there was alkali leaching when the ponds were new.

  6. #16
    Jumbo Appliance Guy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sacicu View Post


    IMO, there is a a correlation between your use of calcium bentonite, the PH of your water, and the population of your bacteria makeup with regards to how thick your wall algae is, and the amount of sunlight with regards to how thick your carpet algae will be.
    As mentioned, I have noticed a loose correlation with the use of calcium bentonite and carpet algae. You are correct that I do notice more debris collectted on the algae when CB is used versus when it is not used. I too, presumed that the flocculent globules were trapping organic matter, that in turn fed the algae.

    pH is 8.2.

    I have another thought I'd like to share. Is it possible that the dissolved oyster shell has precipitated and has formed a "shell" on the liner surface that is high in phosphate? Even without the algae loss there is still the fact of the unusual patches. What are some of the possibilities of what the patches might be?

  7. #17
    Jumbo sacicu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Appliance Guy View Post
    As mentioned, I have noticed a loose correlation with the use of calcium bentonite and carpet algae. You are correct that I do notice more debris collectted on the algae when CB is used versus when it is not used. I too, presumed that the flocculent globules were trapping organic matter, that in turn fed the algae.

    pH is 8.2.

    I have another thought I'd like to share. Is it possible that the dissolved oyster shell has precipitated and has formed a "shell" on the liner surface that is high in phosphate? Even without the algae loss there is still the fact of the unusual patches. What are some of the possibilities of what the patches might be?
    I do not think patches of algae dying off is unusual. It does not work like wall algae gets mowed evenly. Different coloration just mean some areas have thicker wall algae growth then some. I have noticed if water is hard, the color of algae is more green while if PH is soft the color is dark blue green.

    Personally, I dont like thick wall algae growth because they collect and trap the debris and waste that should be filtered out.

  8. #18
    Tategoi Loco4Koi's Avatar
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    I read, early on, that Epsom salts help get carpet algae established in a new pond... I also read that you should use equal parts Epsom salts to calcium carbonate. When using one, you should always use the other.. Just a thought. I don't recall where I read it, but I've always followed that rule since. I typically only add the two in the early spring. I'm still so new, I don't go off of experience, I only go off what I've read and/or heard that made sense, for whatever reason that it did

  9. #19
    Tategoi semi skilled keeper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Appliance Guy View Post
    The deck is new with the pond, so right at two years old. The decking overlaps the liner and the liner is slightly pitched to allow collected water to drape outside the pond. The water does contact the bottom of the deck by 1.5- 2" every time I change water because I "over fill" the pond to accomodate loss when I flush the s/g filters. So there is contact every week.

    Interesting to note that it has been a very rainy year for us and the decking has been saturated more than ever, sooo.... I'm not going to rule out chemical treatment unless otherwise confirmed. Will figure out a copper test once I get some feedback from here. Figure somebody's been down this road....
    Sorry to hear you 'may ' have a copper problem.
    We have one on the carp farm, one bore hole is not used in summer. This is because the aquifer level drops and exposes minerals which oxidizes when exposed to air.
    Copper can have some bad effects on fish , such as reduced breeding, something due to smells !
    Long term can have detrimental effects on fish kidneys and liver .
    I have heard about a substance called acornic acid , made from acorns from oak trees this can be used to remove metal from water.
    Sorry but don't know any more about it, were you would get it ! There is also a material , I think it's a form of shale from Ireland, again this is from the depths of my brain. Again this is only a lead will look in my note books to see if I can find some more info. Don't hold your breath I have a room FULLof note books !

    Brian

  10. #20
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    First, the treated lumber is a problem for the fish. There are many instances of koi health issues being traced back to copper leaching from treated lumber and dripping into a pond. Check up on what you can do to lower your risk. The hard water is probably protecting your fish since you have not had health problems. But, it is still a risk. Personally, I would re-do the deck so no water could drip from it into the pond. It may work, however, to seal the decking with something like an outdoor polyurethane.

    Back to the algae.... Several factors can affect the algae. If I had to guess at one, I'd suspect water temperature as the culprit. Toward the end of July overnight low temperatures began to stay in the upper 70sF to 80F (29-30C), with daily highs in the mid-90sF (35C), so it was common for pond temperatures to rise considerably after having been kept down by the frequent rain. Water temperature probably began peaking around the time you were leaving for vacation.

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