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Thread: settling the mud in a natural mud pond to see the fish better

  1. #1
    Fry
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    settling the mud in a natural mud pond to see the fish better

    I have a natural mud pond 50' x 120' x 6' deep. I have about 80 large koi in it. When I add a lot of lime/gypsum and some alum I can get the water to clear up. After a good rain its muddy again and won't settle out naturally. I have tried filters and they won't keep up. I add about 6000 gallons of water a day to keep the junk skimmed off the top.

    Is there any way to keep it clear short of a liner, or is the rain or fish activity just keeping in murky.

  2. #2
    Jumbo Appliance Guy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mastiffman View Post
    I have a natural mud pond 50' x 120' x 6' deep. I have about 80 large koi in it. When I add a lot of lime/gypsum and some alum I can get the water to clear up. After a good rain its muddy again and won't settle out naturally. I have tried filters and they won't keep up. I add about 6000 gallons of water a day to keep the junk skimmed off the top.

    Is there any way to keep it clear short of a liner, or is the rain or fish activity just keeping in murky.
    Umm, is this Pat??? In Pensacola??? This is Tim.

  3. #3
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    Nice sized pond! Maybe an experienced natural/mud pond owner will come along and give some advice to help you.

    I can only guess. My guess is that the murkiness is a consequence of multiple factors, particularly the type of soil, the type of sediments and the activity of the koi. And, I suspect there is nothing you can do to have the koi be visible in the pond. It is not unusual to see mudponds be muddy from the activity of koi. Even in mudponds that are not opaque with muddiness, the koi are hardly noticeable except when they come to the surface to feed. I am also wondering about the source of water for the pond. Is there a spring? Or, is it groundwater? Is run-off from the surrounding land significant? If so, is the surrounding land used to pasture animals or to raise crops?...Is there high nutrient levels in the runoff? All of these things could be factors.

    I recall a fellow who posted several years ago on multiple boards trying to find a way to get clear water in an old farm pond that was so laden with muck and detritus that it was nothing but a huge algified cesspool. The pond's source water was mainly surface run-off from the surrounding farmland. The fellow was told that the pond had to be completely de-mucked and that it could be easier to dig a new pond, filling the old one with the dirt. Even so, if the run-off was laden with crop fertilizers or pasture animal waste, the situation would just re-occur. It doesn't sound like your situation is anything like that. But, it underscores the problems that come from run-off. Source water is a big deal. All water is not the same.

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    Fry
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    Quote Originally Posted by Appliance Guy View Post
    Umm, is this Pat??? In Pensacola??? This is Tim.
    Yes this is pat

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    Fry
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    The source of the water is a well. I put 2.5 hours of makeup a day at 40 gpm. Do you think it would help to take a bottom overflow instead of top skimming.

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    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
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    for being only a quess, I believe Mike "hit the nail" on the head. What used to amaze me here in the states or in japan, was to see the ponds after harvest and see how the fish themselves move mountains of mud with their mouths...rooting around for extra feed.

    Other side of the coin is the person that posts anxious of predation, because the pond is too clear. maybe keeping them hid has it's benefits. Do believe ultimately if clarity is #1, you may have to invest in a liner.

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    Jumbo Appliance Guy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mastiffman View Post
    Yes this is pat
    Hey Pat! Glad to see ya on here! The 'mastiffman' moniker gave it away. Small world, and even smaller koi world.

    Here are some pics of Pat's pond and dogs....

    settling the mud in a natural mud pond to see the fish better-019.jpgsettling the mud in a natural mud pond to see the fish better-020.jpgsettling the mud in a natural mud pond to see the fish better-017.jpgsettling the mud in a natural mud pond to see the fish better-037.jpgsettling the mud in a natural mud pond to see the fish better-025.jpgsettling the mud in a natural mud pond to see the fish better-032.jpg

  8. #8
    MCA
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    Honmei MCA's Avatar
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    A mud pond is not about viewing fish. A turbid mud pond is for growing out koi in an environment where their skin is not baking under strong sunlight all day...as in a backyard clear pond. One of the great joys of Ikeage is to closely examine how wonderfully the size, skin quality, color depth, and pattern have developed in the relatively dark waters for 6 or more months.

  9. #9
    Fry
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    Quote Originally Posted by dick benbow View Post
    for being only a quess, I believe Mike "hit the nail" on the head. What used to amaze me here in the states or in japan, was to see the ponds after harvest and see how the fish themselves move mountains of mud with their mouths...rooting around for extra feed.

    Other side of the coin is the person that posts anxious of predation, because the pond is too clear. maybe keeping them hid has it's benefits. Do believe ultimately if clarity is #1, you may have to invest in a liner.

    Don't worry about creatures, as you can see in the pictures I have extra large dogs (big guy is 250lbs) and fishing line over top to keep Blue Heron away.

  10. #10
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    The gray color of the mud makes me think you have gray clay soil??? .... I think that's particularly good for fish. It also means the clay particles are among the smallest, which results in it taking much longer to settle and being very easily disturbed. That microscopic particle size also makes it better at retaining water than a red clay. ...Red clay gets its color from iron oxides and is somewhat less adsorptive than gray clays. ...Great for fish, not so good for viewing.

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