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Thread: Ray Jordan "Koi History"

  1. #1
    Jumbo RobF's Avatar
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    Ray Jordan "Koi History"

    Ray Jordan’s 5 part History of Koi.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Ray Jordan "Koi History"-ray-jordan-koi-history-part-1.pdf   Ray Jordan "Koi History"-ray-jordan-koi-history-part-2.pdf   Ray Jordan "Koi History"-ray-jordan-koi-history-part-3.pdf   Ray Jordan "Koi History"-ray-jordan-koi-history-part-4.pdf   Ray Jordan "Koi History"-ray-jordan-koi-history-part-5.pdf  


  2. #2
    Tosai
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    Thanks Rob!

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    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    Excellent tribute to Ray to make these available to everyone. His curiosity about history of koi led him down many paths. There were times when something was said and Ray would recall a casual interview he did of a breeder or a retired dealer. His papers must be voluminous (or digitized). Many details were noted down that never made it into his articles as either too arcane or unverified.

  4. #4
    Jumbo RobF's Avatar
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    Lia Addai the renowned crystallographer (and team) has been investigating the crystals in koi skin cells that shine. The first three papers dealt with gin rin (hydrous state, structure, amorphous precursor). Now they look to the differences between ginrin and metallic. When I told Ray of this he pointed me to this paper, which I forwarded Addadi and Gur to their mutual appreciation.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Ray Jordan "Koi History"-ray-jordan-ogon.pdf  
    Reza likes this.

  5. #5
    Oyagoi yerrag's Avatar
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    Thanks for posting these articles from Ray, Rob. I finally got to read them this weekend and enjoyed them a lot. The passion he writes of Sawata Aoki, the breeder who developed the yamabuki, is the same he has in writing about koi. I greatly admire them for finding great satisfaction in living their intent.

  6. #6
    Nisai
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    Hi Guys ,

    I found this article on the “Kagura” Kohaku co-authored by Ray Jordan ...

    http://texaskoi.org/history-maruyama...kohaku/Regards ,
    KK

  7. #7
    Jumbo RobF's Avatar
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    A small part of Ray's legacy.

  8. #8
    Sansai Reza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KK.Menon View Post
    Hi Guys ,

    I found this article on the “Kagura” Kohaku co-authored by Ray Jordan ...

    http://texaskoi.org/history-maruyama...kohaku/Regards ,
    KK
    Page Is not available.

  9. #9
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    Just as the internet makes so much more easily available, it is all temporary if not continually supported or archived.

    Here is a 2006 Ray Jordan piece on Maruyama:

    Maruyama Koi Farms



    Maruyama Koi farms is located in Isawa Japan and has a very rich and interesting history. Gensuke Maruyama, started breeding koi in the 1960’s. Gensuke-san rapidly became a successful koi breeder. Maruyama koi have won two All Japan Show Grand Champion awards as well as numerous other major awards at national and regional shows in Japan as well as other shows all around the world. Maruyama koi farms majority of production today is Kohaku but hey also breed Sanke and Showa.
    Gensuke-san became close friends with Mr. Minoru Mano (the deceased founder of Dainichi Koi Farm) in the mid sixties. Both were in their late twenties and they often visited each other to discuss Koi breeding and how to improve the overall quality of their koi. Then Gensuke met Mr. Itaru Suda, another famous koi breeder in the Niigata area, and discovered an outstanding Suda-san bred Kohaku, which had a striking and unique very high quality shiny Hiban, (quality of red pattern), brilliant pure white skin, and a strong body shape. Gensuke-san decided to purchase Kagura to be his main “seed” koi and worked to develop a new kohaku bloodline with Kagura’s bright shiny red and clean pure white color quality. This koi was given the nickname "Kagura"(Japanese for tortoise) because her beni pattern looked like a tortoise shell. Shiny sheen appearance to skin and color is one attribute that separates ordinary koi from exceptional koi. The same color tone of red or white looks different on koi with a bright shine to their skin. This is similar to how the same color would look applied on cotton vs silk material.
    That was the very beginning of the Maruyama Koi Farm and the story of the legendary "Kagura". Today this type of brilliant red shiny red beni is called “Kagura” beni.
    Kagura’s very first spawn produced the famous "Kamenoko” kohaku who became Grand Champion of the 17th ZNA All Japan Koi competition in Hiroshima.
    The Kamenoko kohaku produced "Hime" (Japanese for Princess) who was named the National Fish of the Year for two consecutive years.) and another kohaku named "Seven" (1st step looked like the number seven) who was the overall winner of the 17th Koi competition in Tokyo. "Yamato" is another very famous Maruyama kohaku who became Grand Champion of the 28th All Japan Rinyukai Association Show. Other famous Japanese koi breeders such as the Sakai Koi farm in Hiroshima bought other legendary and famous Maruyama kohakus to take an active role as a “seed” Koi in their own successful breeding programs.
    Breeding jumbo sized Koi became a new goal in the eighties. It was very difficult breeding large-sized Koi and still maintaining the "Kagura-Beni" qualities. Generally, early on, the color of Koi that grew large had a tendency to lose the deeper brighter red quality. Gensuki-san kept trying different combinations of male and female koi to achieve the jumbo quest. Gensuki-san, with the encouragement of friends like Mr. Minoru Mano, and the help of his son Futoshi eventually succeeded in producing the highest quality jumbo Koi with "Kagura-Beni". Gensuki & Futoshi Maruyama have successfully changed the world of breeding Koi and continue to keep innovating to produce even higher quality Koi.
    “Kagura” exceeded Gensuke’s dreams and produced a successful line of both male and female seed Koi and many famous show koi as well. It is accepted that today's Japanese Kohaku, well known for their jumbo size and bright shiny red and white could not have been accomplished without "Kagura" and Maruyama Koi Farms.
    In 2005 a Maruyama Showa was named Grand Champion of the All Japan Show giving Futoshi his first All Japan Show Grand Championship to add to his fathers accomplishments.
    I have visited the Maruyama koi farm on three trips to Japan. I hope to visit with Futoshi many more times and admire and hopefully buy more Maruyama Koi. Since my first visit I have been blown away by the beauty of Maruyama kohaku. In 2001 on my first visit I bought my first Maruyama kohaku. She was named Grand Champion of the 2003 Texas Koi Show. This trip I selected a stunning two year old Maruyama kohaku which is pictured below.
    To learn about the history of Japanese koi breeding, top breeders, and their unique history makes buying and keeping Maruyama kohaku all the more exciting and satisfying.

  10. #10
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    A lot has changed in the 11 years since Ray wrote the above. We do not hear much talk about Kagura beni anymore. As with all things koi, the leading breeders have mixed the genetics of one another in the constant effort to obtain further improvement by blending the best traits of each. I would question whether a pure Kagura beni exists anymore. Improvement comes to an end if the focus becomes preservation of a point in time. Maruyama is still producing high quality Kohaku that can grow quite large. I see their Kohaku more in Asian show postings than elsewhere. I am not aware of any dealers in the U.S. regularly importing from Maruyama. I just see an occasional single Kohaku brought in. My impression is that Maruyama has not increased production to keep up with the huge farms... like Sakai Fish Farm, Dainichi, Momotaro, etc. But, can get high prices in the Asian market for what is produced. These are just impressions from what I see on the internet. Perhaps someone comes along with personal knowledge.

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