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Thread: String Algae Experiences

  1. #11
    Oyagoi yerrag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
    There are different species, and there are several forms/varieties of the most studied species. The typical string/hair algae in ponds is from the genus Cladophora. In some conditions, other genera can look like Cladophora to the eye of the hobbyist (e.g., Spirogyra), but these are typically not nearly as robust as the masses of Cladophora pondkeepers encounter (at least in the studies I've come across). Identifying the different species, forms and varieties is beyond the capacity of mere hobbyists. Even the most experienced in the field have difficulty and debate one another ad nauseum. Even DNA studies result in debate over how to draw lines of separation. The only thing that is clear to me is that each variety is adapted to the environmental conditions in which it evolved. With our ponds the situation gets impossibly complicated because pondkeepers import plants and fish from around the globe, and these carry with them whatever varieties are present in the locale from which they sprang. Still, I find it curious that there are varieties that thrive in very cool water (as in the pacific northwest in February) that are apparently not present in my pond. The string algae in my pond thrives when the water is in the low and mid-70sF, but not when it reaches 80F.

    BTW, I continue to be unable to find any study finding string algae (Cladophora) spores in the air. There is some indication that Cladophora can be carried in the slime coat of fish, but this is not established. It definitely is borne by plants even if too microscopic to be observed.
    I'm starting to get the feeling that my algae die-off has a lot to do with the water temperature being higher than usual. Maybe at around 30°C or 86°F the algae started to die off, and the biomass from the die-off was plenty enough to clog my k1 static filter bed every two days. Perhaps I had experienced such algae die-offs in previous years, but since I was using filter brushes as my mechanical filter, I wasn't getting any issues of my mechanical filter plugging up, mainly because the brush filters were more forgiving.

    The hot summer weather is easing up a bit now, and now my k1 filter isn't plugging every two days. It's been a week from my last k1 filter cleaning, and it hasn't plugged up yet. I attribute this change to the weather and resulting lower water temperatures, although the change only involves a drop of 1°C. Another possible cause for the change would be the installation of a shade sail. Maybe, just maybe, the lower exposure to sunlight arrested the algae die-off.

  2. #12
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    I am bumping up this thread from last year because, once again, we had an unusually warm winter in the Orlando area and at what would normally be a peak period for string algae growth, I am experiencing less than normal levels. I am interested in learning from those who had a warm -2016 winter whether they are observing any differences in the algae growth in their ponds compared to what is normal for them.

  3. #13
    Jumbo Appliance Guy's Avatar
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    Mike, this year was moderate for my conditions. Quite nice actually. This year I was able to not turn on the UV and still maintain good water clarity. My load is higher than ever, and of course, feeding increased. I had mild weather, well actually quite nice, never too long of cold and slightly increasing pond temp. I have noticed my carpet algae has started earlier than normal. I don't know if this is related to not using UV or it just is what it is. But I'm loving it! Also this winter had no issues with disease or anything. Typically I will get a koi or two that have some redness (pre-ulcer), but nary a spot on any of them.

    I'm quite the happy koi keeper! Plus I have a koi in the mud, so I am also an excited koi keeper.

    Edit- Still no string algae. Haven't had any ever.

  4. #14
    Fry
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    [QUOTE=yerrag;218056]I have to clean my k1 static filter every 2 days due to algae clogging it up as well. But my pond water has been clear, so the algae has to be carpet algae die-off from the pond bottom and walls, and not so much coming from string algae. But this is on going for a month, and I'm starting to wonder how much more algae will die before the supply runs out. I am getting exhausted with the frequent need to clean my k1.

    I have issues with needing to clean my K1, it's a real pain! Can I ask how do you clean your K1?

  5. #15
    Oyagoi yerrag's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=MikeC;220505]
    Quote Originally Posted by yerrag View Post
    I have to clean my k1 static filter every 2 days due to algae clogging it up as well. But my pond water has been clear, so the algae has to be carpet algae die-off from the pond bottom and walls, and not so much coming from string algae. But this is on going for a month, and I'm starting to wonder how much more algae will die before the supply runs out. I am getting exhausted with the frequent need to clean my k1.

    I have issues with needing to clean my K1, it's a real pain! Can I ask how do you clean your K1?
    My way isn't the easy way, but it's the only way I've got without having to go thru an involved mod of my filtration system.

    When the k1 gets dirty to the point where little water flows through, I stop my flow pump. I then use a net to manually remove the media, and place them in a half-drum (55gal drum). I fill the half-drum then with water, and aerate with airstones. After 15 minutes of aeration, I remove the media into a temporary container, and the dirty water I throw away. I repeat the process two more times.

    Since I have another set of clean media, I can put this set back into the filter while the dirty media is being cleaned. This lessens the downtime involved when the filter is turned off.

    I also need to mention that I also have to siphon off the waste at the bottom of the chamber where the k1 media resides. Note that I find siphoning easy to do, but I have a pond and filter that is above ground, and that makes siphoning much easier to do than on a ground-level pond setup.

    i prefer a static k1 chamber that allows me to 'boil (aerate)' the k1 media without having to remove the media from the chamber, and easily flush away the settled waste thru the bottom coned drain iof the k1 container. it is less work, but I wonder if it does as rhorough a job of cleaning as my more involved manual method.

  6. #16
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yerrag View Post
    i prefer a static k1 chamber that allows me to 'boil (aerate)' the k1 media without having to remove the media from the chamber, and easily flush away the settled waste thru the bottom coned drain iof the k1 container. it is less work, but I wonder if it does as rhorough a job of cleaning as my more involved manual method.

    In my case, with a Nexus, yes, it is just thorough. After 'boiling' with air for a few minutes and emptying the chamber, I repeat the process and let it 'boil' for 15 minutes or longer while doing other cleaning chores. I used to repeat a third time, but found that a long second 'boil' was just as good.... and more time efficient in my case since I was getting other chores done.

  7. #17
    Fry
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    Quote Originally Posted by kishusui1 View Post
    Hi
    I feed Barley flake's from health food shop ,soak first in some hot water from kettle and leave for 30 mins to cool down and then pour into a bucket of your pond water then feed to fish every day for three weeks ,as the koi eat this it will pass through them and rot down in the filter system and release a toxin that is fish safe but kills blanket weed and green water !.
    its been used since the Romans for clearing Algae problems ,and is a treat for koi to eat !.
    I feed around 500 grams per 30 x 1-2 feet size koi plus pellet foods and lettuce and banana ,this helps promote insuforia and kills algae problems without chemicals ! .

    Over what time period do you feed the 500g? Is this per day, per week or the three week period you mention?

    Thanks

    Mike.

  8. #18
    Tosai
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    Here in the PacNW our winters have been warmer that usual, springs are shorter and summer warm temps seem to come sooner. My small, established pond (650g, 5yrs old) gets string algae every year over the winter and early spring. I start dosing with Algae Fix and do this weekly until the water temps get up into the high 60’s+. The pond stays pretty clean after that, with a nice base of carpet algae until late winter when the cycle starts over again...

  9. #19
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    AlgaeFix contains 4.5% of the active ingredient Poly(oxyethylene) (dimethylimino) ethylene (dimethylimino) ethylene dichloride.

    From Dr. R. Conrad;
    The recommendations for dosing AlgaeFix are to dose a gallon of AlgaeFix for each 38,400 gallons of water to kill algae.
    To dose one gallon per each 38,400 gallons is to dose the product at a dose rate of 26 ppm, but the AlgaeFix is just 4.5% active ingredient, so the recommended dose rate of the active ingredient in AlgaeFix is 26 ppm times 0.045 = 1.18 ppm.
    This is 40% of the LC50 for channel catfish, but is 6 times the LC50 for bluegill, and is 30 times the LC50 for trout. So if AlgaeFix is dosed at exactly the recommended dose rate, we should expect all the bluegill to die, all the trout to die, and some of the channel catfish to die. Just so you "get it".
    And this is the RECOMMENDED dose rate, and we all know too well how products are sometimes used in ponds.
    So it is no wonder a lot of folks kill their pond fish with AlgaeFix.

    Okay, AlgaeFix kills algae. So does either hydrogen peroxide or sodium percarbonate.

  10. #20
    Tosai
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricshaw View Post
    AlgaeFix contains 4.5% of the active ingredient Poly(oxyethylene) (dimethylimino) ethylene (dimethylimino) ethylene dichloride.

    From Dr. R. Conrad;
    The recommendations for dosing AlgaeFix are to dose a gallon of AlgaeFix for each 38,400 gallons of water to kill algae.
    To dose one gallon per each 38,400 gallons is to dose the product at a dose rate of 26 ppm, but the AlgaeFix is just 4.5% active ingredient, so the recommended dose rate of the active ingredient in AlgaeFix is 26 ppm times 0.045 = 1.18 ppm.
    This is 40% of the LC50 for channel catfish, but is 6 times the LC50 for bluegill, and is 30 times the LC50 for trout. So if AlgaeFix is dosed at exactly the recommended dose rate, we should expect all the bluegill to die, all the trout to die, and some of the channel catfish to die. Just so you "get it".
    And this is the RECOMMENDED dose rate, and we all know too well how products are sometimes used in ponds.
    So it is no wonder a lot of folks kill their pond fish with AlgaeFix.

    Okay, AlgaeFix kills algae. So does either hydrogen peroxide or sodium percarbonate.
    I've tried HP and also PP, but had less success. I don't like the way sodium percarbonate raises PH. I know my exact water volume and have been dosing Algae Fix per instructions for the last three years. Tend to stick with what works.

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