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Thread: June in japan

  1. #1
    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
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    June in japan

    Is the traditional time of rain, mostly for an entire month. A time to be grateful for the primry crop, Rice. But to Koi Affectionados, it's a time to dream of growth.

    By now, most of the mud ponds have been filled with prospects to grow on.And unlike in America where a little warm weather gets the hobbiests feeding way too heavily, too early,
    those fish out in the mud are being fed cautiously and with no intent to push growth. The real pour the coals to em, feeding program doesn't get started till july.

    Feeding too heavily, too early creates sagging tummies.

    Over the years, we've seen lots of comments on all types of foods. But maybe not enough on the how and when to feed. maybe the topic is timely. Keep in mind as various sections of this vast nation contribute, their timing and methods may vary because of where they sit climate wise. Some of us had mild winters and early springs, others were hit hard with cold and snow and getting started late....but as weather seems to vary dramatically from year to year, there may be something we can all learn....
    Dick Benbow

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    Jumbo sacicu's Avatar
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    Dainichi and Momotaro seem to feed to the upper limit possible that in fact many of their koi that come out from mudpond have obvious bellies. There are even a few nisai with obvious sagging bellies that some are still sold at very high price as the breeder seem confident that the belly would disappear.(if under their care I suppose). Those that develop no bellies though would have better conformation and if skin is present would command an even better price on the market. My thinking is that if they dont feed a lot they would get less number of koi with sagging bellies but those without will not necessary look as good coming out of the mudpond to demand a very premium price.

  3. #3
    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
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    auctually, it's a dance on some females as to how quickly they mature and bear eggs. The sooner they do the more consequences and skill to return them to shape.

    I started this thread in hopes that commentaries would confirm that most americans feed too heavily too early. Fish in Japan are usually slipped into the ponds depending on weather in may. very little feeding is done as they adjust. June comes along with it's heavy rains and again feeding is restricted. It isn't until July that the feeding begins in earnest and the effort wanes the end of september into october weather depending.

    I really think most of us try and get a heavier feeding period then just 3 to 3 1/2 months.

  4. #4
    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
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    When you look into NOAA or the weather channel for their predictions on temps across this nation this summer....where I live it will be way hotter than normal. The mid west and new england, colder than normal. So paying attention to feeding and O2 levels will be important in the Pacific northwest and elsewhere as things are NOT normal.

  5. #5
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    I have been seeing many reports and photos on spawnings by breeders in Japan, releasing newly hatch fry to the mud. Momotaro has released nearly 5.4 million fry... with 3.7 million being black Showa fry. The new koi year is fully underway. It seems impossible that in just 14 weeks tosai harvests will be underway! ....Such a busy time.

  6. #6
    Jumbo sacicu's Avatar
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    Not everything is perfectly rosy in mud pond rearing in Japan. Recently, I heard that there was a breeder who lost one mudpond of koi. After investigating they found out there was a lot of uneaten food decaying at the bottom fouling the water. I have been told by another breeder that many farms are very much updated on predicted weather to adjust their feed rates in mudponds and if necessary make precautionary checks. This comes from years of experience and is not easy.

  7. #7
    Oyagoi yerrag's Avatar
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    This is a topic that rarely gets discussed. Experience plays a part here, but it helps if the keeper is observant, and doesn't fall into the trap of making observations fit into conclusions already shaped by beliefs shared or taught by others. Others may be correct insofar as their own locales and the corresponding climate and weather patterns are concerned. I'm also making changes in how I feed this year. I've been working on the one remaining koi I have that has a pigeon belly. It is a work in progress, but its confirmation has improved so much that I feel I am in the right direction. I was feeding the same amount throughout the year in the mistaken belief that we have an eternal summer here, from the perspective of a temperate region with winters. Now my thinking has changed and I have a seasonal 'fasting' period in my tropical climate. I don't have a natural winter for fasting, and as I begin to conclude the summer fasting period, I find it has benefited the confirmation of my drop belly asagi in particular, and perhaps the other koi in my pond in general. Come the rainy or monsoon season, I will commence my growth protocol. The frequent rains will be very helpful as it allows the pond to take more nitrogen from heavier feeding. Keeping ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates low, will also help growth. That bacterial levels are lowered by dilution with rain also helps greatly. Of course, I continue cleaning my filter, with special attention to the filter bottom, to keep anaerobic bacteria from proliferating. The less energy spent by koi to ward off pathogens, the more energy directed towards growth (and also coloration). Seeing koi with a hearty appetite, and swimming energetically in contentment, in clear pond water, is a visual conformation of us doing what needs to be done.

  8. #8
    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
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    I was reminded recently about mentioning missing a day, when my cat underwent surgery. We had to starve him 10 1/2 hrs before his surgery. As he recovered the next day, good Lord, he ate twice as much as normal and the next few days continued to act as if he'd fasted those days as well.

    When the time ( and temperature comes) and it's time to feed heavily, don't forget to occassionally miss a day of feeding your Koi. It's a proven technique to increase appetites and consumption.Don't let it become a routine on the same day etc. mix it up for better results....

  9. #9
    Oyagoi yerrag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dick benbow View Post
    I started this thread in hopes that commentaries would confirm that most americans feed too heavily too early... I really think most of us try and get a heavier feeding period then just 3 to 3 1/2 months.
    When I started with this hobby, I was worried I'll be spending so much on feeding my koi when they grow up. It was because I was basing my feeding on information I now deem intentionally misleading. I refer to some guidelines from koi food makers to feed koi a daily ration that goes as high as 3% of their body weight.

    I never fed that much, thankfully. It would have made the pond water parameters needlessly untenable. The slow growth approach necessary to good koi development would be compromised, with many koi developing into unattractive monsters.

    One needs to take such recommendations with a grain of salt. We must bear in mind we are into koi keeping, and not into aquaculture. We are not into maximizing growth and profits raising tilapia, catfish, or trout for food. We are into maximizing the beauty of koi in our care. So we can ease up on pumping up their growth rate.

    I'm more into feeding for beauty and much less into growth. If the koi's genetics will allow, it will slowly grow into a large size without feeding heavily. Growth cannot be forced. It needs to be managed so that other aspects of koi development are not compromised, such as conformation and color.

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