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Thread: HELP! New Pond Syndrome going crazy!!

  1. #11
    Tosai
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    Quote Originally Posted by ricshaw View Post
    No, I would drastically cut back on feeding and do normal water changes WITH a chloramine removing product that also removes ammonia.

    Ammonia: 2.5ppm bothers me.
    We're only feeding them a small amount every 3 days since this started.

    What would you consider a normal water change? And how often?

    Thanks

  2. #12
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    10% - 20% twice a week.

  3. #13
    Tosai
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    No gravel filter, I have 2 filter boxes with a filter inside.

  4. #14
    Tosai
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    Would I need to add more bacteria?

  5. #15
    Jumbo sacicu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bnlauren View Post
    Would I need to add more bacteria?
    i do not think adding more bacteria is necessary. You do need to add some salt of at around 0.3% salinity until such time nitrite levels go down. Can you describe your filter box?

  6. #16
    Sansai
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    Quote Originally Posted by sacicu View Post
    i do not think adding more bacteria is necessary. You do need to add some salt of at around 0.3% salinity until such time nitrite levels go down. Can you describe your filter box?
    Hi bn
    Pictures of the media and flow configuration would help.
    Pond water turn over rate through the filters

  7. #17
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    'New Pond Syndrome' is a bad experience every koikeeper shares. When my current pond was built (over 10 years ago), I purposefully pumped greenwater into the sparkling clear pond and eagerly accepted the offer of a friend who gave me a pail of his used media to put in the filter. That was the only time I set up a new pond or aquarium with no adverse effects. The water stayed green as the unicellular algae consumed ammonia released by the fish. When the pond started to become too murky, I used the UV to avoid oxygen depletion. Even with mature media being seeded into the filters, it took a couple of months for reliable nitrate production. The process may have been slowed down a bit due to the greenwater algae competing with the nitrifiers, but over time the nitrifiers do prevail. Over the couple of months that the pond was 'breaking in', I was testing for ammonia, nitrite and nitrate regularly.... sometimes twice a day. I had bad memories of things going wrong before. It is the most challenging time. You have a new pond you've planned and dreamed about. You've worked hard on it and everything seems exactly what you hoped, and then everything starts going wrong.

    In Bnlauren's situation, I would perform 20% water changes two or three times per week; and keep testing, using an ammonia neutralizer until there is no detectable ammonia. I would add a little salt to counteract nitrite. (The 0.3% suggested is fine. Even 0.1% will do the trick.) ....BTW, the presence of nitrite is a good sign. It means the first stage of nitrification is getting established. Then, it requires patience. Usually, it takes a minimum of 6 weeks for the nitrifiers to take hold, and 8 weeks is not uncommon. You know they are getting established when you can detect nitrate. Once they become established, nitrate production takes off and no ammonia or nitrite should be detected. If ammonia or nitrite is still detected, then it is likely that there is insufficient bio-media in the filter system for the nitrifier population to expand to the point where it can handle the ammonia production instantly. If that happens, more media has to be added. If the filters cannot accommodate more, it will be necessary to upgrade or reduce the fish population to match the bio-filtration capacity.

    Good luck!

  8. #18
    Tosai
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    Quote Originally Posted by coolwon View Post
    Hi bn
    Pictures of the media and flow configuration would help.
    Pond water turn over rate through the filters
    I have 2 filter boxes and each is able to filter 500gal. I can take pictures when I get home this evening but it's attached to the pump (which cycles 3200gph) in a "T" formation. Below is a link to the filter boxes.

    Tetra® Pond Submersible Flat Box Filter | Filters & Filter Media | PetSmart

    On the opposite end of the pond there is a 1.5" Diameter pipe that sits 1.5-2' above the water as the water exits in the pond (will soon be configured into a waterfall with stones).

  9. #19
    Tosai
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    In Bnlauren's situation, I would perform 20% water changes two or three times per week; and keep testing, using an ammonia neutralizer until there is no detectable ammonia. I would add a little salt to counteract nitrite. (The 0.3% suggested is fine. Even 0.1% will do the trick.) ....BTW, the presence of nitrite is a good sign. It means the first stage of nitrification is getting established. Then, it requires patience. Usually, it takes a minimum of 6 weeks for the nitrifiers to take hold, and 8 weeks is not uncommon. You know they are getting established when you can detect nitrate. Once they become established, nitrate production takes off and no ammonia or nitrite should be detected. If ammonia or nitrite is still detected, then it is likely that there is insufficient bio-media in the filter system for the nitrifier population to expand to the point where it can handle the ammonia production instantly. If that happens, more media has to be added. If the filters cannot accommodate more, it will be necessary to upgrade or reduce the fish population to match the bio-filtration capacity.
    So.....Do the 20% water changes 2-3 times per week and make sure salt is at 0.1-0.3% and wait another 1-2 weeks to see if nitrate production takes off? I say a 1-2 weeks because the pond was established 7 weeks ago but koi have been in there for 6 weeks. Then after 1-2 weeks if I'm still seeing nitrite and ammonia levels I should add more bacteria or considering upgrading my filter system?

  10. #20
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bnlauren View Post
    I have 2 filter boxes and each is able to filter 500gal.
    Tetra® Pond Submersible Flat Box Filter | Filters & Filter Media | PetSmart
    "Up to 500 gallons" more like 250 gallons. Not nearly enough biological filtration for 900 gallon pond with 7 Koi.

    Yes, you need to considering upgrading your filter system.

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