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Thread: Aya?

  1. #11
    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
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    THE PROCESS OF CREATING NEW COLOR VARIETIES IS ON GOING. SOME "STICK" OTHERS DON'T.....

    But atleast the challenge is on going to create something "new and improved"
    as the marketing guru's like to remind us.....

  2. #12
    Nisai
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    Hi Guys,

    for the first time I read about Ayawakaba apr. one year ago in a german Koi-Mag. One Dealer importet a few ones from the first spawings.

    Here is a picture from this first Ayawakaba



    The Dealer and the importer reports, that this variety is breed und developed by WAKITA KOI FARM.

    Is this the name of Kodamas Farm?

    Or are there different breeders?


    Regards Nico

  3. #13
    wild horse dinh's Avatar
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    Here is another pix of Ayawakaba from online auction. The breeder is
    Yamanaka Oya. The same breeder for the other Ayawakaba on Genki's site.

    And here is the info/description regarding Ayawakaba from that auction site :
    "


    "Ayawakaba" means "colorful young leaf" in English. This is a rare & precious variety that only Yamanaka Oya Koi Farm can produce in Japan. It was bred through the mating of Shusui and Midorigoi.
    The yellow design just like the autumn gingko is so fantastic. This bright yellow design stands out on the bluish Shusui skin clearly.

    "
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Aya?-ayawakaba.jpg  

  4. #14
    Sansai
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    Regenmeneer

    it looks like a ki shusui to me, however some of the koi do have a browner colour, like ochiba, so is the koi meant to be yellow or not? if the colour is meant to be yellow id say ki shusui or if brownish then a new type of ochiba colour koi...Ayawakaba?

    Ki Shusui...
    http://www.bidorbuy.co.za/jsp/BidFor...radeId=1569621

    kevan.

  5. #15
    Fry
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    Wakaba

    If you like that I know where you can buy the babies ofthe koi you are look at just email me.

  6. #16
    Fry
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    Wakaba pictures

    here are some pictures of the Babies
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Aya?-midoriwakaba-1.jpg  

  7. #17
    Fry
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    More Wakaba

    Also I Put more Wakaba and there is this new red one.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Aya?-akawakaba.jpg  

  8. #18
    Fry
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    More Wakaba

    this one of the nice ones.

  9. #19
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    Yes, Kodama is now promoting these as color variants Midori Wakaba (green wakaba) and Aka Wakaba (red wakaba). I find the yellow tones of the Aya Wakaba appealing, although the examples posted above 3 years ago were most notable for simply being different. The recent color variants seem even less refined. The Midori Wakaba might turn out interesting if it becomes the bright yellow some Midorigoi achieve. But, as with the many new varieties attempted in the 1960s and 1970s, it takes many generations to get a gene pool established and very few supposed varieties hold up in the process. These new varieties represent small clusters of offspring from a spawning of particular oyagoi. If the oyagoi are changed, the phenotype may not emerge among the fry. Crossing the supposed new variety with itself often results in a broad array of useless crapagoi. Breeding back to the parent line, usually with the oyagoi or siblings of the oyagoi, typically results in the desired characteristics becoming submerged in the more dominant genes of the introduced parent.

    There were many colorful 'varieties' created using Shusui 40 or so years ago. They proved ephemeral. In addition to the difficulties of establishing a gene pool that will consistently produce the desired traits, Shusui adds the strong tendency for the fish to darken and become smudged with gray in a splotchy fashion.... altogether unattractive. For a breeder to succeed in the creation of a new variety that will endure, it must be one with pretty tosai that attract some revenue to offset the cost of devoting large amounts of space. And, the breeder cannot know how the fish will develop, so a lot of tosai have to be kept to grow to nisai in order for the breeder to learn how to cull/select. There then must be sufficient nisai of worth to get significant revenue. If the fish crap out at age 2, there will not be a market to sustain the continuing investment required to establish the variety. In a Shusui cross, the blotches of underlying sumi may not show until after age 3, at which point the fish may become quite unattractive.

    Midorigoi are a rare example of a Shusui-based variety that has endured, but it is a rare specimen that remains attractive at 24"/3 years. Most are at best eye-catching tosai that crap out in the course of their second season. Still, those few that remain attractive after 3 years get enough attention to keep a market for all the tosai that quickly fail. It provides that 'something different' to spice up the bulk export sale of sparkly and shiny ones.

    Maybe these color variations on Wakaba can endure in the marketplace. Don't know. Personally, I doubt it, simply because I do not see the attention-grabbing prettiness that I think is necessary to have sufficient revenue generation to support the endeavor. On the other hand, if the yellow Aya Wakaba could be produced on a sustainable basis, I think it might succeed. People really like the look of a Ki Shusui, and the Aya Wakaba was close enough to capture interest. Since it has not been seen with any regularity over the past 3 years since this thread was begun, I'm guessing there were simply too few worthy ones produced out of a spawning to justify the expense of production, or too few remained attractive after 3 years ... or it labors under both weights.

    A breeder must truly be devoted to reaching a vision for a new variety to get established. It's not a way one makes a living.
    Last edited by MikeM; 08-19-2008 at 08:28 AM. Reason: typo

  10. #20
    Jumbo Appliance Guy's Avatar
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    Bump. Saw a thread on another board about this variety (if we can even call it that). Got to searching my library (Google) and Voila'- I'm here. So, Mike I think you're right. Not much action on this koi "variety". Is kinda neat though...

    ricshaw likes this.

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