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Thread: Administering Clove Oil.....

  1. #21
    Sansai
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    232
    No, alligator snapping turtle (Macrolemys temmecki). They are a large heavily-beaked snapping turtle from parts of the US, largest freshwater turtle in the world. They use their tongue as a lure to attract fishes then *snap*! They are also a protected species. That is why they are the worst choice for a koi pond. I was doing a countdown of turtle species from worst to best. An alligator snapping turtle is not an alligato(Alligator mississipensis). I own a large 6-year old female african clawed frog, and tough as she is, she couldn't eat my koi. However, I know better than to keep her with other fish. I keep more than just koi you know.
    "Koi keeping begins and ends with the Kohaku"

  2. #22
    Nisai
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    St Louis, Missouri
    Posts
    78

    You missed the point!

    Alligators are as appropriate in a pond of koi as turtles.... Unless the koi were added as feeders.

    Plastic or resin turtles are another matter. I don't go for that kind of thing, but some folks can't resist gnomes and such.

    Koi ponds should be designed to suit their inhabitants - specifically the koi. There is an important difference between surviving and thriving, and most koi keepers have more than just survival as their goal. Stocking koi ponds with predators is foolish, as is stocking them with pathogen-ridden GF. (Was that diplomatic enough??)

    Kohaku - Do you keep turtles in the pond with your koi? If so, how do you address the additional burden on the solids handling system? Winters in Conneticut can be rather severe, so how do you deal with the cold and snow? Do you bring the koi or the turtles inside? I'm guilty of leaving my koi outside for our winters, but we are Zone 7 and I keep my pond domed - which greatly reduces heat loss due to wind and evaporation, and adds a smidge of solar heating. The koi still sulk until temps warm up, but I haven't had any health problems in 7 years. (I've also held off on buying any more koi until the pond can be upgraded.)
    Lynne in St. Louis

  3. #23
    Sansai
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    232
    I don't keep turtles with my koi, I know how dangerous they can be, but some people are dead set on keeping them, and I can understand why(turtles are great). My koi are tosai, they would not stand a chance against a turtle. I know that koi and turtles don't mix. If people insist on keeping turtles with their koi I want them to be informed as best as possible. I want them to pick the smallest, least aggresive species possible. (RES tend to carry transmittable salmonella more than others, and can be aggresive.- Bad Choice) I like turtles but they defacate alot, an unecessary strain on a filtration system. How does diplomacy come into play here? You are certainly wise with how you handle winter and your pond, I assume this comes from experience? No greater teacher...

  4. #24
    Oyagoi bekko's Avatar
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    Sep 2004
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    Hakipu'u
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    1,383
    We have red-ear sliders which move from pond to pond at will. They nest in sandy areas around the place and produce about 30-50 young per year. I have given up trying to get rid of them, but if I catch one with a 4-inch carapace it is sent to the local pet store. They probably eat a few small fish, but I have never caught one in the act. I cannot imagine them catching a koi of any consequence. We have one female slider who usually stays in a small mud pond, but crawls over the bank into the adjacent filtered and lined koi broodstock pond every day at feeding time. She eats her share of pellets.

    When we were kids, everyone had a baby turtle at some point. You could buy them at the 5-and-dime store. Often they came with a decal or design painted on the shell. They were usually sold with a plastic bowl which had a platform for sunning and a little plastic palm tree for decoration; plus a small orange box of Hartz turtle food. Then, someone decided that baby turtles would transmit salmonella to children and they were banned in the US. Individuals with a carapace length of 4 inches or more are still legal - the logic being that these older turtles would not be picked up and handled by small children.

    There are still turtle farms in the US Deep South and elsewhere in the world. They ship the baby hatchlings by the hundreds of thousands to Europe for the pet trade and to Asia as a medicinal gormet food. In Honolulu, a 1 to 2-inch hatchling sold (illegally) for turtle soup is worth about $15 while a 4-inch turtle for the pet trade is worth about $10.

    -steveh opkins

  5. #25
    Sansai adreamer2's Avatar
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    Dec 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
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    265
    I have one red eared slider (res).... and it was this thing that nipped my black moor and ate the one I was going to anesthetize to save from ongoing pain....

    I took out the RES and put him in my Puerto Rican lobster claw plant bucket.... The next thing I know, before I could even move him... I see this plant rocking back and forth like something out of a Jurassic Park movie... I could not even find him to put him in his own tank.... Daggone thing burrowed into the soil ....

    Thinking about what you just said... I know why now... Because its sandy ....


    Adreamer2
    Adreamer2,
    gmcfayden,
    N2Koi
    -----------
    Alas, I have found my feat.. and am about to run!

  6. #26
    Oyagoi
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
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    Puerto Rico
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    1,230
    What is Puerto Rican lobster claw plant???

  7. #27
    Honmei KoiCop's Avatar
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    May 2005
    Location
    Southern California
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    3,774

    This entire thread . . .

    reminds me of a bad "trip" I took back in the '60's.

  8. #28
    Sansai
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    232
    Why is that?

  9. #29
    Sansai adreamer2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    265



    This is a heliconia Lobster Claw plant.... Mine came from Puerto Rico...... They make you get phytosanitary paperwork when they send it for some reason....

    I bought three different kinds....


    Adreamer2

  10. #30
    wild horse dinh's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    A future show to be defined soon....
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    4,810
    Quote Originally Posted by adreamer2



    This is a heliconia Lobster Claw plant.... Mine came from Puerto Rico...... They make you get phytosanitary paperwork when they send it for some reason....

    I bought three different kinds....


    Adreamer2
    lovely plant... can it survive in California areas?

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