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Thread: KHV research in Australia - update

  1. #1
    Oyagoi mrbradleybradley's Avatar
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    KHV research in Australia - update

    Hi

    As you may be aware, the CSIRO is conducting research into KHV as a possible biological control on common carp in Australia. Today, Tony Peacock, CEO of the Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre posted an introduction and update on the following link.

    http://koi2day.com/forum/index.php?topic=807.0

    Those interested and participating in KHV research outside of Australia may benifet from this research as well

    Regards

    Bradley

  2. #2
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    He says "the right things". I am always leery of those who think they can figure out enough to control nature.

  3. #3
    Daihonmei PapaBear's Avatar
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    I know it has been said before, but haven't they learned??? Introducing wild carp in the first place is how the problem started, which is just another repeat of past non-native introductions in the wild. After they manage to kill off "most" of the carp with a "non-native" disease, how will they then deal with the offspring of the naturally immune survivors who will no doubt pass that immunity on to their "bullet proof" fry? Just what the aussies need. Kudzu Carp

  4. #4
    Oyagoi bekko's Avatar
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    This is insane.

    In the southeastern US there are thriving populations of wild carp which are infected with KHV. Part of the reason it has been hard to get the authorities interested in regulating KHV is because it is considered a "disease of confinement". There are many diseases of confinement in all areas of animal husbandry and wildlife management.

    An avian pathologist once told me that he didn't mind dealing with the pathology and health management aspects of a new poultry disease, but could not stand dealing with the doom-and-gloom predictions of the impacts on wildlife when the disease escapes the chicken house. These impacts almost never come to pass, but you never know. When you look at the history of poultry epidemiology you find that the opposite situation occurs much more frequently. A relatively benign disease in wild stocks will often become devastating if it gets into the chicken house. Here, the high density, weird diet, weird environment and other stresses foster diseases of confinement.

    Nobody ever said it has to make sense. But, I thought you Australians were smarter than the rest of us.

    -stev ehopk

  5. #5
    Oyagoi mrbradleybradley's Avatar
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    Hi

    I have now posted an email from those involved in the day-to-day running of the research.

    http://koi2day.com/forum/index.php?topic=807.0

    Dear Bradley,

    Mark Crane, who runs the Fish Diseases Laboratory at the Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL), has passed on your message enquiring about our research on KHV and information on the biosecurity procedures at AAHL. I'm actually responsible for the day-to-day running of the KHV project, so I'll try to address your questions.

    AAHL is one of about 5 high-security laboratories in the world that specializes in veterinary diseases, and I think it is fair to say that, although it is now over 20 years old, it is still regarded as one of the most sophisticated labs of its type in the world. AAHL was built specifically to allow work on foreign (or exotic) animal diseases that have the potential to devastate any of Australia's primary agricultural industries, including of course the aquatic animal industries. The development of rapid diagnostic techniques, and a better understanding of the diseases, allows a better chance of controlling the diseases were they to enter Australia. Of course, containing the viruses that cause these exotic diseases is of the highest priority, and the following web site will provide you with a little more information on how that is done at AAHL (particularly the section on "Biocontainment"):

    http://www.csiro.au/csiro/content/standard/psxu,,.html

    As for the project itself, we have completed a few of the introductory steps such as importation of the virus, and establishing methods to work with the virus. This Spring, we hope to actually test the susceptibility of Australian carp to the virus, and, by the end of Autumn, we hope to have gathered some information on the dynamics of viral infection in carp (eg, just how sensitive are carp to the virus, and, once infected, how much virus does an affected carp produce?). Later in the project, we'll be looking at the specificity of the virus, particularly whether KHV has any effect on a number of Australia's native species. Evidence from overseas studies suggests that KHV is highyl specific for common and Koi carp, but, still, the specificity-testing needs to be conducted on some Australian species.

    I hope this information is of some help to you, and I'd be happy to help you with any further questions. Please feel free to contact me if you wish.

    Best wishes,

    Ken


    Dr Ken McColl BVSc PhD
    CSIRO-AAHL
    PO Bag 24
    Geelong Vic 3220
    Australia

    Telephone: (03) 5227 5104
    E-mail: [email protected]


    BB

  6. #6
    Oyagoi bekko's Avatar
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    Biocontainment is wonderful. However, the primary question they are asking (can KHV safely eradicate feral carp populations) can not be answered within a biocontainment facility. That answer will only be answered in a full field test.

    -steve ho

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