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Thread: Mont/bentonite clay and ph??

  1. #11
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    Brutuscz is dealing with water that is quite soft at a GH of 40ppm and a pH near neutral. This is comparable to snow melt. It is wonderful water if a constant in-flow could be maintained at a 10% per day rate. Folks have posted before about using lithaqua, but I'm not familiar with it. So, I go with recommending the oyster shell as having been found reliable over time.

  2. #12
    Sansai Gail's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Russell Peters View Post
    With our harder water, as opposed to water in Japan, oyster shells dissolve too slowly to have any real benefit.
    Yes, what I was told Russell.too bad, because we have unlimited access to shells here!

  3. #13
    Honmei Brutuscz's Avatar
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    So...what do you consider a good way to buffer my water? I definitely want to avoid a ph crash. I like the soft water for growth and the tds of 51 is a dream come true...but I am a little scared for the future.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
    It is wonderful water if a constant in-flow could be maintained at a 10% per day rate.
    Can't be clearer, Doc.

    Mickey the windowman

  5. #15
    Honmei Brutuscz's Avatar
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    yeah, but that is not exactly practical. Who wants to leave a chlorinated hose running in their pond all day/every day? I meant is there a good additive, that is reasonably priced and easy to acquire?

  6. #16
    Oyagoi bekko's Avatar
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    Brutuscz, you have the water I want (except for the chlorine part). With that water I would be all kohaku, all the time. It's pretty easy and inexpensive to add alkalinity, but very costly to remove hardness. Crushed shell (poultry grit), aragonite, lithaqua, crushed coral should all work.

    -ste Veh

  7. #17
    Tosai
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    Brutusiz,
    I see you want "prevent" a pH crash?

    A suggestion:
    Take the pH in the morning and then in the evening. If there is a widly different reading it may be worth buffering the water.

    Be aware that there is a natural pH variation throughout the day.

    However, it appears that your pH varies between 7 - 7.2. Don't touch the pH. You do not have a problem and therefore - if it ain't broke don't try to fix it.

    regards,
    Chris

  8. #18
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    Please let me suggest a whole house carbon filter which is backflushable. Several times pics of them in use on member's ponds, specs for them and some sources have been posted.

    10% a day flow through could be handled by a big RO, so using carbon shouldn't be expensive.

    PH crashes occur in neglected, overstocked, or traumatized ponds. Take care of your soft water to avoid crashing conditions. You may be forecasting doom where there is none looming for a careful keeper.

    You seem to have a pleasant problem compared to this mineral build up on media at my house.

    Mickey the windowman
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mont/bentonite clay and ph??-qual-move-blue-052.jpg  

  9. #19
    Daihonmei PapaBear's Avatar
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    Tooting Lithaqua's horn

    It has been mentioned already, but I'll go ahead and add my advocacy for Lithaqua. As soft as your water is Oyster shell (crushed poultry grit, not whole shells) may be more effective than if you had typically hard water, but I know lithaqua works from personal experience. I purchased some for our pond last spring from Russell and I am more than pleased. We've had zero ph swings, even after heavy rains followed by hot sunny days. It doesn't raise your kh abruptly the way B.S. does, but it will keep it in a very comfortable range.
    Larry Iles
    Oklahoma

  10. #20
    Honmei
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    Quote Originally Posted by PapaBear View Post
    It has been mentioned already, but I'll go ahead and add my advocacy for Lithaqua. As soft as your water is Oyster shell (crushed poultry grit, not whole shells) may be more effective than if you had typically hard water, but I know lithaqua works from personal experience. I purchased some for our pond last spring from Russell and I am more than pleased. We've had zero ph swings, even after heavy rains followed by hot sunny days. It doesn't raise your kh abruptly the way B.S. does, but it will keep it in a very comfortable range.
    How effective the Lithaqua is depends on several factors. Your fish load, you water conditions and the ratio of Lithaqua to water volume. The more Lithaqua you use the better the result.

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