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Thread: Mont/bentonite clay and ph??

  1. #1
    Honmei Brutuscz's Avatar
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    Question Mont/bentonite clay and ph??

    My new pond had a gh of 40, kh of 20, tds of 51 and ph 7.0-7.2. Will adding this type of clay be helpful in preventing a ph crash? I have read about crushed coral/shells helping, but was wodering if this clay would have the same buffering effect. I have been adding some for several weeks...out of habit. I was just wondering if it works in this capacity.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brutuscz View Post
    My new pond had a gh of 40, kh of 20, tds of 51 and ph 7.0-7.2. Will adding this type of clay be helpful in preventing a ph crash? I have read about crushed coral/shells helping, but was wodering if this clay would have the same buffering effect. I have been adding some for several weeks...out of habit. I was just wondering if it works in this capacity.
    I can really answer your qustion about bentonite clay, but I know I can tell you atleast one thing that will raise your total hardness. Calcium Carbonate is the one that can raise this. I am not sure where to find it, you could probably buy it online, and if out of chance you live at or around the bay area, you can find it at pskoi. I used to have a really low gh like you, and sumi didnt do well in my pond. now it develops pretty good for me.

  3. #3
    Tosai
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    Clay doesn't alter my readings very much at all - but we have very hard water here.

  4. #4
    Sansai Gail's Avatar
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    http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/learn/bentonite.php

    the clay itself has a ph of 8.3-9.1

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gail View Post
    http://www.mountainroseherbs.com/learn/bentonite.php

    the clay itself has a ph of 8.3-9.1
    You would have to add a lot of clay to alter the ph to a point that would be noticeable wouldnt you?

  6. #6
    Jumbo
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    I would recomend raising your KH and GH to 160 PPM. This will help stabilize your PH and prevent a possible PH crash. I went through a similiar PH problem this spring and with help fron Dr. Roddy Conrad, raised my KH and GH to 160 PPM and that solved my PH problems and even helped the colors in my fish.

  7. #7
    Sansai Gail's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birdman View Post
    I would recomend raising your KH and GH to 160 PPM. This will help stabilize your PH and prevent a possible PH crash. I went through a similiar PH problem this spring and with help fron Dr. Roddy Conrad, raised my KH and GH to 160 PPM and that solved my PH problems and even helped the colors in my fish.
    I remember that Steve.......All are certainly lucky to have the best to go to for advice and treatment protocol!

  8. #8
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    I see postings from time to time in which it is suggested that using a bentonite-type clay adds beneficial minerals to the water. I am not aware of any studies, or "kitchen lab" tests, indicating that any material amount of mineral content dissolves into the water of a koi pond. The idea is not consistent with the nature of such clays. Clay is very stable. That stability is an aspect of its structure ... a structure which makes it useful for the intended purpose of drawing contaminants out of the water. In any particular sample of bentonite (whether calcium or sodium is in the greater proportion) there may be some negligible amount of free calcium or magnesium to add to the hardness of water, but I doubt it would be measurable in the quantities used in a pond. There could be an indirect effect on pH, I guess. Ammonium will be adsorbed on the clay crystal's surface, where it is not readily available to nitrifiers. The nitrification process produces acids. To the extent there is less raw resource for the nitrifiers, there would be greater pH stability. I'd not think this is sufficient to offset the risk of a pH crash in extremely soft water.

    There is a reason the Niigata breeders use oyster shell in their soft, mountain water locale.

  9. #9
    Sansai Gail's Avatar
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    I thought about using the raw oyster shells here Mike, but was told that by the time they would break down the benefits wouldn't be great?(pacific)

  10. #10
    Honmei
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gail View Post
    I thought about using the raw oyster shells here Mike, but was told that by the time they would break down the benefits wouldn't be great?(pacific)
    With our harder water, as opposed to water in Japan, oyster shells dissolve too slowly to have any real benefit.

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