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Thread: UV light, on or off?

  1. #11
    Oyagoi gspotmc's Avatar
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    Lee and JR,

    There was a beach front porperty back home (Philippines). It used to measure at 30 hectares 8 or 9 years ago and now it is down to 3 hectares. Is this one of the effects of global warming? The documentation was featured from an International channel GMA network it's a Filipino channel. Since the subject of global warming has been brought up. How is this gonna affect the hobby overall? I also noticed that my pond turned green with the sudden increase in temperature. I'm running a 200 watt UV. I will check out my lamps tomorrow. Water started turning green with the abrupt rise in temperature here in Socal. My pond is under full sun. Lee may be right.
    Michael

  2. #12
    Lee
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    ...I am not an expert in global warming.

    Michael...

    I am not an expert in global warming.

    I am not even an expert in this hobby.

    I do know, however, that koi are very hardy and that they can handily deal with reasonably freezing cold water to tropical heat pond water levels.

    On the negative side, I am also keenly aware that once your pond water exceeds 92 F. that the physical stress on your fish becomes a unnecessary hardship for them and could be the cause of their demise (they are, after all, cold water fish and they are not tropical fish) - thus, it behooves you if you want to have 'live' and healthy fish to use every possible means in moderating your pond water temperature and in finding every method in which to reduce the pond temperature of your pond water.

    Michael, I think everyone already knows that the warmer the water in which your fish are kept - the less oxygen that your pond water will retain. Therefore, having less oxygen in your pond water the more difficult will become your fishes ability to make use of the oxygen in that water which they need to survive with....

    I am certain JR can explain this (technically) far better than I can...however, whereas we all know that warm water will serve to eliminate numerous bacteria and other 'bugs' which infest a pond, too warm a water can also kill your fish...as well as, your good bacteria.

    I am curious, however, exactly what is your pond water temperature? And, is it nearing a 92 F. level?

    And, if it is..why is it, you're not covering your pond?

    Also how deep is your pond?

    Michael, as you know, you can cover your pond quite easily with various colours and depths of light emisssion, shade cloth...

    I say easily obtainable, becuase if I can obtain shade cloth in the Cayman Islands and have it hung over each of my ponds and over each of my filter areas (where all of my filters and plumbing are installed)...then, so can you, too.

    You can also plant fast growing shade trees that grow quickly to create shade. Or, move large potted shade giving plants near to the pond edge of your pond to throw shade across your water. You can also hang various inert materials to shade your pond water - or, float styrofoam sheet on top of your pond water - all the while, increasing the air into your pond water.

    Water falls are basic, as they cool the water and they also aerate the water.

    Bottom drain air diffusers, are also vital to moving the water column and adding air to your pond? Same with air stones when used both in your pond, as well as, added into each of your filters (it also is essential for keeping your bacteria also alive, as you know.)

    Michael, I have all of my pumps covered-over with plastic open weave laundry baskets to keep the sun off of them, too. This helps to keep them in the shade and run cooler.

    I have seriously considered also wrapping all of my exposed PVC pipes with silver insulation material to reflect the sun off of them...however, I am not certain whether just their being white PVC is an adaquate reflective property for this or not?

    Michael, I have even reset the time clocks that had turned on night lighting over my pond - inorder to eleminate the 60 watt bug wacker light which I have been using since our hurricane four years ago to kill flying insects and bugs - as I didn't want any more light over my pond than I already had naturally (to eliminate the algae growth.)

    My colleague, there are a dozen things you can do TODAY to help reduce the heat of your pond water and help your fish to survive the ever warming water situation, which I believe we now have occuring.

    Including, your also purchasing an accurate pond thermometer to tell us all - what your water termperature is...in the mid day sunlighted heat of the day.

    Michael, I hope the above basics was of some help to you...However, if not, please come back onto this thread as I do want to be of any help that, I can to you...

    With my respects,

    Lee
    Grand Cayman

  3. #13
    Daihonmei
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    Hi Lee, OK so you have the time frame for effective UV intensity right, I think. 6- 9 month is probably the beginning of drop off for a good kill rate. That of course menas that individual cells are likely still damaged but not as predictable.
    The other key is the speed in which the water carrying the green cells passes by the lamp. There needs to be not only a wattage but an adequate exposure time. And as the bulb weakens in intensity, the exposure time must be increased. In any pond, generally speaking, the slower the rate thru the UV, the better the kill. So you might try reducing the pump or creating a shunt for some of the water to pass thru the UV.

    As far as warm water goes, it is more about the loss of oxygen saturation levels than the actually reading of the temperature. This applies to the fish's physiology as much as the algae. As water warms, fish pass more undigested food as less is absorbed in the gut. The fish also puts out more waste. The fish also increases it's respiration rate, it produces more carbon dioxide. The rest of all this ( less oxygen) is more organic waste and more carbon dioxide, all good things for algae cells to grow. JR

  4. #14
    Lee
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    It's just like I predicted...Jim's response will be more technical than mine.

    Jim,

    What a good idea...slowing down the flow of water?

    I ask, who else would have thought of that?

    Why the 'heck' hadn't that also occured to my aging gray matter? Ya mon, what a good idea. (And, 'please' no ugly comment about my aging, gray matter, either...ok?)

    Mr. Fed Express just delivered another replacement light tube and I've already installed it...It's on. It's working. And,I am hopeful that it will soon commence to eliminate 'some of' my increased algae growth - starting now.

    It is not, however, neither of the two new UV lights which I have recently purchased.

    I am hoping these two 'new' UV lights will make the real difference I am now seeking!

    The larger pond where I installed the new tube this morning is already slowly clearing-up. However, for that pond I have also a brand new UV light somewhere now in-flight to me.

    The Lim UV lights which I had since installing this pond have been discontinued by William and I feel that their replacements are subject to the same questionable life...so, I've decided no more of his equipment for either of my ponds. In fact, as I have discovered so few of what I've purchased and installed in either of my ponds seems dependable.

    There are numerous other manufacturers, however, who do make UV equipment which I have found to be more dependable. Thus, I am 'junking' those of Williams manufacture and replacing them with UV's that neither spark, sputter nor short-out...

    Hey, Jim - you certainly had a good day at the equity market, huh?

    Keep it, would ya, please!

    Your pal

    Lee
    GC

  5. #15
    Daihonmei
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    Good Morning,

    great, it sounds like you are making progress, then? Once a pond goes murky green, it will take a while to notice the killing effect of a UV. The individual cells become a rather giant organism and it can take a few days to a week to cut them back to a point that clear water is seen again. This is because the way green algae organizes itself is dense at the surface and less and less as you go deeper. Even in pea green ponds the bottom few inches of water are not as green. So the UV begins it's work by making the wall structure of algae disfunctional. It doesn't matter if the cell is actually killed on contact. The damaged individual cell will stick to other cells and all will sink to the bottom. This is the danger of killing algae off too quickly. Massive dead cells collecting on a poorly designed pond floor or one with poor drain coverage, become a feeding ground and breeding factory for pathogens. This is why more frequent, but small, water changes are needed when the UV first starts to make a dent in the giant green organism known as pea soup water.
    Usually in three or four days of effective UV you will see a lightening of color and then one morning- BAMMM, the water is perfectly clear.
    A rig of UV and Foam Fractionation, by the way, is the perfect combination to 'crimping' cells and 'removing ' them 24 X7.

    The markets are great , mate! I'm currently working on placing my 'babies' ( US zero treasuries) as stop loss protection securities- married to hedge fund indexes ( those wacky risk taking widow makers) so that they provide limited downside. Very sexy, very profitable! At least it will keep me in 'koi pellets' another year.

    Your Pal in New Jersey, JR

  6. #16
    Lee
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    It' doesn't matter what the topic....

    Jim,

    It doesn't matter what the topic is, you usually go 'waaaaaaay over my head.

    Hedge funds, derivatives, included...

    With my warmest hugs,

    Your pal

    Lee
    GC

  7. #17
    MCA
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    Lee,

    I am using one of Gary's Zappure 40 units. "Big Bertha" is a very nice and effective unit. Good kit.

    MCA

    PS: Toni and Dexter say "hey".

  8. #18
    Lee
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    Now, you tell me!

    Michael,

    I had never seen this UV unit before, now.

    I was not familiar with it...

    However, it looks very good. Of course, I wish I had seen it.

    I purchased another UV.

    There will perhaps be another opportunity if the units I now have in route are not as good as this one which you are now using.

    In the meantime... take care of your bride, as you know.... I adore her!

    With my warmest hugs to you too!

    Lee

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