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Thread: Domineering Karashigoi

  1. #1
    Nisai
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    Domineering Karashigoi

    I have two kois in a small 1000 gallon pond. One is a Karashigoi and the other is a Kohaku. The Karashigoi is eating all the food. Somehow he will push the kohaku to a corner and my kohaku gets very very minimal food.

    In the beginning i try to throw the food right at the kohaku's path but now the karashigoi seems to recognise this and has become even quicker and more aggressive. So much so, now my kohaku has been pinned down to the half of the pond that is full of oxygen and he does not come out much from there. I cant even throw food there as there is too much surface interruption from the bubbles.

    This kohaku is very special to my eyes. It is an expensive koi from Momotaro and is now exactly one year old at 44cm. My karashigoi is my first koi and it has very good growth rates. He is just under one year old and is already 53cm and that was in the breeder's pond with minimal food.

    What should i do? I feel the kohaku is stress from this and it would not be good. My pond which is so small makes this type of competition even more acute because in a big pond he can have a lot more room for solace. Should i exchange the karashigoi for another koi or just let nature takes its place. I feel nature will kill the kohaku out of stress

    Mark

  2. #2
    Daihonmei aquitori's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mingaun View Post
    I have two kois in a small 1000 gallon pond. One is a Karashigoi and the other is a Kohaku. The Karashigoi is eating all the food. Somehow he will push the kohaku to a corner and my kohaku gets very very minimal food.

    In the beginning i try to throw the food right at the kohaku's path but now the karashigoi seems to recognise this and has become even quicker and more aggressive. So much so, now my kohaku has been pinned down to the half of the pond that is full of oxygen and he does not come out much from there. I cant even throw food there as there is too much surface interruption from the bubbles.

    This kohaku is very special to my eyes. It is an expensive koi from Momotaro and is now exactly one year old at 44cm. My karashigoi is my first koi and it has very good growth rates. He is just under one year old and is already 53cm and that was in the breeder's pond with minimal food.

    What should i do? I feel the kohaku is stress from this and it would not be good. My pond which is so small makes this type of competition even more acute because in a big pond he can have a lot more room for solace. Should i exchange the karashigoi for another koi or just let nature takes its place. I feel nature will kill the kohaku out of stress

    Mark
    I would try feeding a mix of floating and sinking, if you have no room to seperate the 2 fish.

  3. #3
    Nisai
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    The sinking method will not work because the kohaku simply will not even come out of that corner. It is the corner with all the oxygen and splashing of water from the bakki shower. The kohaku dare not even come out and when she does she zips back in again.

    Will this affect the immune system of the kohaku?

    Mark

  4. #4
    Daihonmei aquitori's Avatar
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    At some point the Kohaku will just have to "man" up and start getting the food...If the Kohaku is hungry enough he should be fighting for food, unless there is something internally wrong with the fish....

    I have tosai in my pond with koi over 20" inches and these tosai fight to get food...

  5. #5
    Nisai
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    I will wait then and see. Hopefull he can muscle out the karashigoi. Looks like a David and Goliath battle to me, I need to be God then to help David

    Thanks for the advice.

    mark

  6. #6
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    I have a couple that are timid when it comes to competing for food, particularly floating pellets. One is rather large, but just does not like to have much activity when eating. When sinking food is fed, the activity is less, as the koi graze slowly across the bottom vacuuming in the food. I think Tonio's suggestion is a good one to try. Toss some sinking pellets to the Kohaku while giving floating pellets for the other. You may find that after a month or two the greediness goes away and they are able to share the food better.

  7. #7
    Nisai
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    I think i will give it a try. Anyway no harm trying.

    Thanks for the advice.

    Mark

  8. #8
    Nisai
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    Ok i have tried the sinking pellet tactic and guess what, it worked like a charm. She ate like a glutton and my karashigoi also did the same. Both seem to prefer the sinking pellets. I can literally see my kohaku putting on bulk and length. I think it suffered at the dealer's pond in being a bottom feeder taking only scraps of food.

    When i thought my fears were all over i found a new problem. Both of them hardly ever surfaces, in fact the kohaku absolutely have not surfaced in the last week. I cant even see her clearly at all. I have actually unintentionally made them bottom fishes This is not funny at all as i am not sure what to do. I am at the stage where i am not sure if i am keeping koi for them or for me If i persist in floating pellets the kohaku will never reach its potential and might even die as a result of a lack of food. If i persist with sinking, she might grow well but for who to see??

    Very frustrating.

    I called my dealer he says the koi is scared. He advise me to buy more kois, saying two is not enough. I am tempted but i believe an extra koi will overload my system that has been set up perfectly for two kois. Besides buying an extra koi might not be an answer and it will be a costly mistake as well.

    I am thinking of dumping the sinking pellets and persist in the floating one and hope that the kohaku will toughen up. This might result in she not feeding maybe up to one week or even more. Is this the right thing? I love this kohaku and i will be very sad to see her potential lost.

    Mark

  9. #9
    Daihonmei PapaBear's Avatar
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    Well at least you got it to EAT

    Since they are both eating together on the bottom it may be that the intimidation is going away and the Kohaku will be less prone to stay on the bottom if you begin feeding floating food again. When the sinking food supply begins to get low start feeding 1/2 sinking 1/2 floating and slowly feed more floating until the sinking is gone. Once the sinking food is no longer available I'll be it will take less than a week for them both to be feeding at the top together.
    Larry Iles
    Oklahoma

  10. #10
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    Over the past few years I have had a half dozen or so koi who preferred to stay on the bottom. In all but one case, it was a temporary behavior that went away after a few months. I think you should feed both floating and sinking food, and then occasionally floating only. She will adjust. The idea of adding a third koi is a good one. It has been observed that in groups of 3 or more the koi take comfort in the school and show less fear. Of course, it is important that your system be able to accomodate that number of fish. If you have 2500 gallons (say, 9-10 tons) or more it should not be an issue... I've forgotten the size of your pond, but recall you had some space issues. (More gallonage would be better, of course. Some will say you can go down to 500 gallons per koi and still get acceptable growth, etc., but based on what you have posted in the past about your goals, I do not think that approach would work for you.) If you have the gallonage, you might try an inexpensive koi of similar size. Select on the basis of how friendly it is in swimming up to you at the dealer's tank. Many have observed that one friendly koi coming up for food causes the others to understand that it is safe to do likewise. Chagoi are often recommended for this purpose, but they generally grow quite large, so I would not recommend one for a pond having gallonage constraints. Patience is important.

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