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Thread: Cost To Heat

  1. #1
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    Cost To Heat

    Out of curiosity, what does it cost to heat a 10,000 gallon pond to 48F if covered with a coldframe structure that lets in sunlight but not wind? ... I realize it will vary by region, etc., but I'm thinking the cost is not as great as many would assume.

  2. #2
    Honmei
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
    Out of curiosity, what does it cost to heat a 10,000 gallon pond to 48F if covered with a coldframe structure that lets in sunlight but not wind? ... I realize it will vary by region, etc., but I'm thinking the cost is not as great as many would assume.
    Mike,
    Of course as you mentioned is depends on the region, utlity rates and type of heater. In Dallas, I heated to 10 degrees above ambient (coldest being 50F) for $250 for the season (nov, dec, jan, feb,part of march). Oh, but my pond was NOT covered that year...could have been even less. In my case I wasn't as concerned about extreme low temps as much as I was about rapid temperature fluctuations.

    If a person takes their utility costs the year prior to heating their pond and adjusts for rate changes and changes in "heating days" (information available through US Weather Service), they can get a pretty accurate picture of the true costs.

    Edit: I only heated the upper 4500 gallons
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    Oyagoi gcuss's Avatar
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    And not to hijack Mike's thread. Out of curiosity, what does it cost to heat that same pond to the mid to high 60's per month? And if you reply, could you give us a rough idea of your winter temps, or region you live in?

    Reason I'm asking, part of my reasoning for bringing the fish in for the winter is that I have such a long winter where I am. In all reality, if left to it's own devices, my pond becomes too cold to feed by early Oct. and I don't expect it to warm up to the point of being able to feed again until late April. For me, it's just too short of a growing season. My reality is the pond will hit the high 60's/ low 70's for one month of year without assistance, and IMO it's just too short of a season.

    I'm looking at ways to heat my pond for next year right now. I'll only be heating in the spring/fall. Winter I'll still be bringing them in. It's just too tough to keep things working outdoors.

    Grant

  4. #4
    Oyagoi Eugeneg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeM View Post
    Out of curiosity, what does it cost to heat a 10,000 gallon pond to 48F if covered with a coldframe structure that lets in sunlight but not wind? ... I realize it will vary by region, etc., but I'm thinking the cost is not as great as many would assume.
    Mike
    You would average out by saying a 1000w heater for 6months run 12hr
    a day . But for 45f You would not need any heat . That is based on correctly insulated pond . A 1000 gal with 1000W heater to reach 70f
    would have to be run 24hr a day for 3months.
    If you wish to heat a 7000 gal to 70f then the whole pond has to be insulated as ground temperature drops to 47f so it would be a big heat loss mine with under cemment circulating water costs about $3000 for the season useing an oil fired hot water tank,
    The interesting thing is that the fully insulated all the way round pond would only be 42f if I did not use a wood stove as opposed to 45f if it was only insulated 3ft down and getting the 47f ground temperature.
    Regards
    Eugene

  5. #5
    MCA
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    Honmei MCA's Avatar
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    Calculating Pond Heater Size in BTU/hr:
    Option A for Heat loss calculation for uncovered pond:
    Heat loss (Btu/hr) = 12 X pond surface area X desired pond temperature - coldest ambient temp.
    Example: Pond is 9 feet wide and fifteen feet long, uncovered surface. I want the pond around 70F and it gets down to 28F at night. Sometimes colder, sometimes warmer. Here's the math: 12 X (9ft x 15ft) X [70F minus 28F at night]. Works out to: 12 X 135 sq. ft. X 42F margins. = 68,040 BTU/hr.

    Option B for Heat loss calculation for almost completely covered pond:
    Heat loss (Btu/hr) = pond surface area X desired pond temp. - coldest ambient temp. Make sure an airspace is maintained between the surface of the pond and the cover. Do not float the cover directly on the pond unless it is a "bubble wrap" type.
    Example: Pond is 9 feet wide and fifteen feet long, with a covered surface. I want the pond around 70F and it gets down to 28F at night. Sometimes colder, sometimes warmer. Here's the math: (9ft X 15ft) X [70F minus 28F at night]. Works out to: 135 sq. ft. X 42F margins. = 5,670 BTU/hr.

    Calculating Pond Heater Size in Kilowatts:
    * First do the calculations to determine the BTU/hr needed for your uncovered or covered pond.
    * Divide the BTU/hr calculation result by 3,412. This will tell you the size of electric heater needed in kilowatts (KW).
    The example uncovered pond in Option A above needs a heat exchanger capable of 68,040 BTU/hr. The properly sized electric heater would be 20KW. That will a very expensive system to install, and operate given the price of large electric heaters and the electricity to power them! So it you are planning to heat the pond, plan on some type of cover!
    The example covered pond in Option B above needs a heat exchanger capable of 5,670 BTU/hr. The properly sized electric heater would be 2KW. That will a moderate system to run.
    Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

  6. #6
    Daihonmei MikeM's Avatar
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    Thanks! Very interesting. More observations/comments welcome!


    ... Although this is not relevant to my situation, it is to the majority of hobbyists in the U.S., U.K. and Europe.

  7. #7
    Jumbo
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    Another thing to consider is BTUs per dollar. In my area natural gas is not available, and I can get more BTUs from a dollar of electricity than I can from a dollar of propane, so I went with a 2" inline SS 5.5 KW elec. heater for my pond.

  8. #8
    Daihonmei
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    Quote Originally Posted by eugeneg View Post
    mike
    you would average out by saying a 1000w heater for 6months run 12hr
    a day . But for 45f you would not need any heat . That is based on correctly insulated pond . A 1000 gal with 1000w heater to reach 70f
    would have to be run 24hr a day for 3months.
    If you wish to heat a 7000 gal to 70f then the whole pond has to be insulated as ground temperature drops to 47f so it would be a big heat loss mine with under cemment circulating water costs about $3000 for the season useing an oil fired hot water tank,
    the interesting thing is that the fully insulated all the way round pond would only be 42f if i did not use a wood stove as opposed to 45f if it was only insulated 3ft down and getting the 47f ground temperature.
    Regards
    eugene
    that is a post worth saving

  9. #9
    Daihonmei aquitori's Avatar
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    I thought koi was a 4 season fish....

  10. #10
    Daihonmei
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    Quote Originally Posted by aquitori View Post
    I thought koi was a 4 season fish....
    Koi are carp. Carp have the ability as a SPECIES to survive through all four seasons, they do not have the individual ability to survive through the stress of all four seasons...
    as I stated in the Brurscz pond temp thread...it is the expectation of the koi hobbyist that is different ...nature does not care if 98% of the carp die in a harsh Winter...there will be enough to breed and replenish the water system...heck even the old subsistence black carp breeders were only comcerned with that...all they needed were enough carp to breed and fill their ponds so they could eat ...
    Now if koi hobbyists would just accept the same level of survival in their koi as carp have in the wild we can make the same statement...
    Koi are four season fish...you breed them, you keep all the young, 98 percent die each winter and you breed what is left in the Spring...every year you'll have koi

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