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Thread: DIY bioball/milk crate Bakki

  1. #21
    zek
    zek is offline
    Sansai
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    170
    Lori,

    That is a fine modular mansion! Even has a pond out in front.

    I wish logistics were different. I could give you all the dirt you need, but it wouldn't be worth the trouble to move it from Arlington.

    The good thing is Ford should be the last american auto company standing. Obama Motors will likely be Chapter 7 within a couple years.

  2. #22
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    240

    Zek, Motown, All.

    Zek, Are you coming to Mikes on Sunday? I would like to meet you in the flesh! Dang on the Dirt!!! I could of used it!

    Motown, and whom ever may be interested:confused :, I recycled the under liner stuff from the old liner. I installed the new liner, and drain.
    Why am I sawing, chiseling and hammering on the stupid thing? I must have issues. See photos.

    I will post to the "Drilling Shower Crates" thread. I need help on the spacing for drilling the holes for the "shower" bar.
    Unless you know. Thanks, Lori

  3. #23
    Banned
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    240

    Cool Cool.

    COOL.

  4. #24
    Tategoi
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Fremont, CA
    Posts
    367
    A Bakki Shower uses a particular type of media containing many holes with extremely sharp edges. When water strikes the media waste is sliced off and forced down the hole where anaerobic bacteria digest the waste. What you are building with bioballs is called a Teickle Tower (TT) Itís a good filter but not nearly a Bakki Shower. Dispite the bennifits to the pond, Iím not a supporter of Bakki Chowers. They use far more power than they are worth. The are many other filter types that don the job as well that donít take as much power. (Can you say $400.00 utility bill?)

    Motown, you discovered one of the many reasons for a deeper pond. Stability in temperature and moderation of temperature.

    A shallow pond will be much more likely to follow day/night changes in atmospheric temperature and solar influx(not always a good thing). First the deep pond has a much larger mass to distribute the heat gained or lost by the surface/depth ratio. That will keep your pond from the daily swings experienced with shallow ponds. Next, the earth is always shedding heat. As you go down in depth, the soil gets warmer. In the winter it sheds plenty of heat as the water drops below the adjacent soil temperatures. In my area, San Jose, Ca, The soil drops to the low 50s in Feb and raises to the high 60s in Aug. We start gaining a little heat at around 55 and continue to increase the gain down to about48 at a 2í depth. A pond 6í deep will go down to the low 50s. That and a good cover keeps the water comphy.

    In colder areas, you should insulate your pond sides to a depth of 2' below the frost line.

  5. #25
    Nisai Motown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Dearborn, MI USA
    Posts
    112
    Quote Originally Posted by Rich L View Post
    Motown, you discovered one of the many reasons for a deeper pond. Stability in temperature and moderation of temperature.

    A shallow pond will be much more likely to follow day/night changes in atmospheric temperature and solar influx(not always a good thing). First the deep pond has a much larger mass to distribute the heat gained or lost by the surface/depth ratio. That will keep your pond from the daily swings experienced with shallow ponds. Next, the earth is always shedding heat. As you go down in depth, the soil gets warmer. In the winter it sheds plenty of heat as the water drops below the adjacent soil temperatures. In my area, San Jose, Ca, The soil drops to the low 50s in Feb and raises to the high 60s in Aug. We start gaining a little heat at around 55 and continue to increase the gain down to about48 at a 2í depth. A pond 6í deep will go down to the low 50s. That and a good cover keeps the water comphy.

    In colder areas, you should insulate your pond sides to a depth of 2' below the frost line.
    Rich,

    I should have explained in greater detail. My pond is 4 ft below grade, and 2 ft above grade. The part of the pond that is below grade has 2" pink foam on the outer walls between the soil and the concrete wall. During the winter, I line the parimeter of the exposed wall above grade with hay bails, the set my wood trusses (4) on top of the bails. The whole thing gets two layers of 6 mil plastic sheeting.

    Motown

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