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Thread: Newbie - New koi pond

  1. #1
    Fry
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Question Newbie - New koi pond

    hello all, id like to say this place is brilliant and there are some cool photos floating about that have given me some cool ideas for my first koi pond.

    Ive just bought myself a new house and ive always wanted a koi pond (large one) a few of my friends have them and well what can i say i just want one.

    Im looking at going for this size.

    15 X 12 X 6 about 8000 gallons (fibreglassed)

    Obviously there are a few different styles that you can build such a pond... i need mine raised as i have a lil baby on the way. However whats your opinion on waterfalls, having oriental planting around the pond etc...

    i was thinking of 3 foot above ground and 3 ft below.

    any ideas and suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    thanks again

  2. #2
    MCA
    MCA is offline
    Honmei MCA's Avatar
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    Our pond is 10x16x8 and is ~10,000 US gallons. Had I the additional room I would have made it 10x20x8. It is 2 above ground and 6 below. Two feet above ground keeps small pets (2 leg and 4 leg) out and still is short enough to provide seating. Three feet high would be too high for comfortable seating for anyone who is not a basketball player.

    While the child is too young to be safe around water, put up a fence such as would be required (at least in the States) around a swimming pool. Once the child is old enough, then you can remove the fence.

    If you can, go deeper than 6. Personally I very much like the extra water volume you get with 8-9 feet depth. It gives the koi lots more room to exercise vertically. And the more of the pond that is inground...the greater the temperature stability.
    Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

  3. #3
    Fry
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    as far as im aware 4 feet is min depth for a koi pond so i guess 6 ft is ideal? i mean they are going to have a lot of water to swim in. I mean 15 X 12 X 6 is well BIG! in my eyes anyways...

    my friends is 12 X 10 X 5 and his is big...

    so i will do as you say go 2 feet high and 4 feet below... damn im going to be doing some hardcore digging this summer.

    as for the dog, he is a andrex puppy / yellow lab and he loves playing up lol... so if he has chance he will be in... but he has a kennel and a section of the garden just for him to play in.

    as for filters for my pond im looking at 2 of the Nexus Eazy 200's and 2 bottom drains... im guessing this is a good idea for the size of my pond?


    suggestions and ideas welcome

    thanks again

  4. #4
    MCA
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    Honmei MCA's Avatar
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    Personally I don't think 6 is ideal...more like miniumum...given that koi are riverine fish. But 6 is much better than say...4. The water volume for the size you are giving would be around 8000 US gallons. Not a bad size at all. I would suggest the shape be less square and more rectangular. When you start geting into 12 width or more...netting starts to be a problem unless your herding net has an 8 long pole.

    So if there is room, consider a pond size of 10x20x6 with two BDs...each centered in one logical 10x10 half of the pond.

  5. #5
    Nisai
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    Oct 2004
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    Camby, Indiana
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    My advice is to go bigger than what you think you want. This hobby is addicting. I also agree with MCA, go deeper. Especially depending on part of the country you are in. The deeper depths will provide temperature stability during cold months and during hot months will provide some cooler water. Also make sure to add jets (returns) around the pond to create the "toilet bowl" effect. Try to avoid "dead areas" As far as a waterfall, we have one that has a double stream and while I love the aesthetics of it, it is also a pain in the behind. I can't stand the look of algae on it.

    Design with the knowledge of how much shade you are going to be getting. We are in full sun and as such always get more algae than others. It's always good to provide the fish with some shade. Be careful with the filters and prefilters you use. Invest your money wisely there to avoid the filter upgrades that many of us wind up doing later--that's very costly. Do as much as you can now...if you want one thing but can't afford it now, plan to add it/change it out later - include that in your design. A good prefilter is a must but especially if you are going to be in full sun (algae) or have a lot of leaves will be good. There are lots of types.

    Read, read, and read some more. Ask many of the people on here to comment on a specific design before you buy anything or start digging.

    Also, with young one, I am assuming a baby...our pond was built when our middle was 2 and before we had our last one. We invested in good door knob thingys for the back door so the children could not just open the door and wander out. We also taught them from day 1 to NEVER ever ever ever go out back without an adult. Those two are now 9 and 5 and the rule pretty much still applies.

    Hope any of that helps.

    Tamara
    NMZNA Koi & Goldfish Show and Pond Expo - Indianapolis
    June 19-21, 2009
    Season's Gardens in Fishers, IN
    www.nmzna.net

  6. #6
    Fry
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    The pond shape i have already decided on and is basically a slightly squashed reqtangle with rounded edges which will remove any black spots.

    I will be having returns in the pond to allow for the toilet bowl effect and the waterfall, well what can i say. My friend has one its green lol so i wont be having one of those.

    My pond will be in the sun but im going to be covering it with what of them shelter things i cant remember the name lol made of wood. also i have a few large trees knocking about.

    I am definately having 2 bottom drains as my friend has 1 and his pond isnt as clean as my other friends who has two bottom drains and two seperate filters for each.

    What is your opinion on me surround it with soil and plants? (oriental plants)

    for a pond my size how many air pumps would you recomend?

    thanks again

  7. #7
    Tosai
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    Quote Originally Posted by gofish View Post
    My advice is to go bigger than what you think you want. This hobby is addicting. I also agree with MCA, go deeper.
    I agree with MCA and Tamara. I've never once read a post by someone who regretted making their pond too big or too deep, however, too small and too shallow are extremely common complaints. 15'x12'x6' is big, but Koi are big fish. Picture fish in an aquarium. How long are they relative to the depth? Now picture a fish that is about half as long as the tank is deep. Does it look like he belongs there?

  8. #8
    Fry
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    Well if i go 14X12X6 like nearly 8000 gallons of water, my fish will have a fair amount of room to swim in... wont they?

    i cant go any bigger as i wont have any garden left for my dog to run round in / for me to do bbq's etc.. lol

    thanks for reading

  9. #9
    Jumbo RobF's Avatar
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    For a first pond your doing good. Plants around the pond look great and provide shade. They require maintenance, drop stuff into the water, and threaten you with their roots. Plants in the water can look really great, water lilies with koi swimming beneath is the classic pond pic. I have four water lilies in my pond, they require some maintenance. Experienced koi keepers will probably tell you to avoid them (and rocks) but I say, in moderation, they add a lot to the pond experience. And this is being your first pond it promises you many interesting experiences. At the AKCA KHA site there is a Beginnerís Guide to Ponds http://www.koihealthadvisor.org/kha_images/pdf/KoiPondBeginnersGuide.pdf . Or if you want if from the source authority, read what the King of Koi Kichi has to say about ponds (and all) http://www.koikichi.com/da/89187

  10. #10
    Fry
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    Hey, im not going to be adding plants with flowers on just things like small oriental trees etc... where they hardly shed anything. But my top skimmer should get any unwanted floaters on the top.

    My pond is going to be concrete / fibreglassed... with the size im going, im looking at 2 bottom drains...

    now for the size of the pond... the big question is how many fish do i put in?

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