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Thread: Bakki shower filter

  1. #31
    Tosai KidKoi20's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eds View Post
    If it's a display pond I'd have some way of removing solids from the pond. If you want to run a bottom drain filter it via a sieve and then pump over the shower. You could then either have another system on the skimmer (such as static K1), just the basket or another sieve and then I would pump that over the shower too.

    Another option would be to have a static and fluidised K1 filter that runs off the skimmer line and is returned back to the pond via subsurface returns to provide different type of circulation.
    Eds, thanks for your response. This sieve idea seems like the best to me, I'm trying to keep my plumbing as simple as possible. As far as the skimmer circuit goes, it will most likely be only the skimmer basket, in order to keep it simple and keep the costs down where I can. What exactly is a K1 filter? I understand the circuit order, I am just unfamiliar with the K1 filter. And is this K1 filter an easy DIY project?

    Quote Originally Posted by PapaBear View Post
    A few thoughts for you to ponder KidKoi20.

    Bakki's are fantastic for biofiltration, but not as solids filters. No matter which circuit you pull from for the shower you want some type of mechanical waste separation before hitting the pump. It will save you a lot of work trying to keep the shower clean.

    As to aerated drains, supersaturation is nearly impossible so not aerating the BD will not help you but it may reduce the efficiency of the drain as the aeration not only adds O2 but it improves the currents that sweep solid wastes toward the drain as well.

    Lastly, you live in the Chicago suburbs. That means hot summers and frigid cold winters. A bakki shower will help to maintain better water temperatures during the summer months as the evaporative action in the shower trays helps to cool the water before it returns to the pond. In the winter that is a very bad thing, and you don't want the shower to be your only biofilter. I'd suggest having the shower on a skimmer circuit and the BD on a filter level with the pond. It will hold ground heat better and allow you to shut down the shower and run the filter longer and extend your growing season considerably.

    Just my opinion.
    PapaBear, Thank you for the input. The more I hear about the sieve the more it seems necessary. I like the simplicity of the sieve to shower as well. But if the shower is in line with the skimmer, would that eliminate the need for the sieve?

    The aeration also seems like a better and better idea the more I think about it as well. I will just have to do a little more research as far as installation and integration with the plumbing goes.

    Could you also please elaborate on the filter with the bottom drain? I'm a little confused on how the setup would work.

    I appreciate the advice, and answers to my many questions.

    Thanks again!

  2. #32
    Daihonmei PapaBear's Avatar
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    There are lots of great threads here on pond construction for you to glean information from, but one of my favorite things for people to look over when still in the planning stages is right here.
    Nishikigoi Pond Filteration.pdf (application/pdf Object)
    It is an excellent primer on designing a healthy pond and filtration system for any ponder. If you start with that and then look over some of the other construction threads it will serve you well and save you a lot of trouble down the road
    As to your own setup, having a sieve on the skimmer circuit (or some other waste catcher) is a good idea. Pollen, leaves, bugs, etc... being caught rather than ground up in the pump and then on to the bakki shower is a big time saver. Many factory made skimmers have good debris catchers built right in and you can check them out as well.
    As far as a pond level filter goes, there have been several good threads on using "air lifts" recently. Airlifts can only move water vertically a little bit, but if the pond and the filters are at the same level they can move a tremendous amount of water very efficiently and cheaply. A typical filter of this type would be a settlement chamber and/or sieve followed by several chambers of well aerated biomedia and then pumped back to the pond. This provides several benefits.
    Air lifts or low head low electrical consumption pumps can be used at a great savings in operating cost.
    If an airlift is used it is easy to add a protein skimmer to the return pipe as a fringe benefit.
    If the filter chamber is at ground level it will retain heat from the soil, thereby promoting a quicker start up in spring and an extended season of warmer water in fall. During summer months the ground level filter will also help to promote greater stability to your pond temperatures from day to night even as the shower promotes off gassing and cooling during hot months.
    Larry Iles
    Oklahoma

  3. #33
    Tosai KidKoi20's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PapaBear View Post
    There are lots of great threads here on pond construction for you to glean information from, but one of my favorite things for people to look over when still in the planning stages is right here.
    Nishikigoi Pond Filteration.pdf (application/pdf Object)
    It is an excellent primer on designing a healthy pond and filtration system for any ponder. If you start with that and then look over some of the other construction threads it will serve you well and save you a lot of trouble down the road
    As to your own setup, having a sieve on the skimmer circuit (or some other waste catcher) is a good idea. Pollen, leaves, bugs, etc... being caught rather than ground up in the pump and then on to the bakki shower is a big time saver. Many factory made skimmers have good debris catchers built right in and you can check them out as well.
    As far as a pond level filter goes, there have been several good threads on using "air lifts" recently. Airlifts can only move water vertically a little bit, but if the pond and the filters are at the same level they can move a tremendous amount of water very efficiently and cheaply. A typical filter of this type would be a settlement chamber and/or sieve followed by several chambers of well aerated biomedia and then pumped back to the pond. This provides several benefits.
    Air lifts or low head low electrical consumption pumps can be used at a great savings in operating cost.
    If an airlift is used it is easy to add a protein skimmer to the return pipe as a fringe benefit.
    If the filter chamber is at ground level it will retain heat from the soil, thereby promoting a quicker start up in spring and an extended season of warmer water in fall. During summer months the ground level filter will also help to promote greater stability to your pond temperatures from day to night even as the shower promotes off gassing and cooling during hot months.

    Another member here actually showed me that article a while ago, MCA I believe. It is very helpful. I'll be sure to check out the factory made skimmers, I have already looked at the brand Savio. And if they perform as advertised, it will catch up to 85% of debris. So potentially I could run that directly into the shower, right?

    As far as air lifts go, they look a little complicated for my amateur plumbing and pond construction skills. But, I'm up for giving it a shot.

    In the coming week or so I plan to begin my own construction thread with pictures of what I'm already working with, and plans of what I would potentially like to do. My pond last summer was around 700 gallons, at about 3 feet deep at the deepest point. I plan to go to around 5 feet deep hopefully and have a volume of around 1800-2000 gallons. I hope to have my new pond up and running by early to mid june.

  4. #34
    Daihonmei PapaBear's Avatar
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    Airlifts are really pretty simple once you look at them closely so don't be intimidated. Low head pumps are still a great option and I only mention the airlifts as they are equally viable for this type of application.

    I'm glad MCA had shared that with you. He put it together several years ago using some well earned knowledge he has picked up along the way. Like many of us he began with a water garden and graduated upward to a serious Koi Pond as he learned from past mistakes. (People like us have a lot of mistakes we've learned from along the way) Saving others from having to endure those hardships is one of this hobby's little pleasures

  5. #35
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PapaBear View Post
    Airlifts are really pretty simple once you look at them closely so don't be intimidated. Low head pumps are still a great option and I only mention the airlifts as they are equally viable for this type of application.
    I have nothing against airlifts, but lets get serious.
    Which air pumps are we talking about? How many amps (watts)?
    Are airlifts still viable options with the new energy efficient water pumps?
    Enquiring minds want to know.

  6. #36
    Daihonmei PapaBear's Avatar
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    Take a look at the "Air lifts are dreamy" and "Air lifts Rock" threads to get a better sense of direction on them. Some of the new high efficiency pumps really are competitive and any application needs to be viewed from the standpoint of what works best for your own pond system.
    Air pumps are all over the map with energy efficiency and reliability as well, so it is worth investigating them well too. Another advantage they offer is the ability to regulate flow by controlling the amount of air injected into the lift, either by throttling air flow between the air lift and an airstone or by switching to a smaller pump during cooler weather if desired.

  7. #37
    Tosai
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    i run double sieve double bead and it all returns over a shower i add another pump in summer giving me about 52000 liters per hour over the shower
    this is on a 5500 gallon pond my water is like glass and hanna tells me its fish safe

    so im happy

  8. #38
    Sansai
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    Great discussion!!!!! Thanks everyone for your input! and Thanx Koi kid for asking many questions! airlift pumps seam to be a GREAT addition to a pond, they seam to move water very well and the air pumps are lot less likely to break down or have problems I would think over a regular water pump. I've never had a air pump before so I'm not sure of this. I have went through many submersable pumps over the years though in my little 400 gallon pond. Thanks for sharing the links you guys, I am DEFINITELY interested in birdmans add-on extractor!!!! GREAT invention! I am going to look hard to all my local gardening and landscape yards for some feather rock!!!
    If I knew what I know now, when I had my little mini ex in my back yard... I would have dug TONS more for a filtration area!!! I do have a place I plan on putting like 4 of those 275 gallon totes for mechanical... before sending water to my shower I hope to build, nice n big, oh and PRETTY!!! so my girlfriend don't flip out!
    Skimmers? I want 2 of them... I need to figure a way to possibly make BIG garbage can type or something so I don't have to have More settling tanks.. maybe just a stock tank after with media then return to the pond.
    GEEZE i could talk for DAYS about all the many different ideas and thoughts that go through my head about this pond build every day and night!

  9. #39
    Sansai
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    OOOPS! I thought this was my thread I started called "bakki shower" sorry

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