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Thread: Eric and a fountain pond build......

  1. #1
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    Eric and a fountain pond build......

    Waddy's 2010 fountain pond build
    Waddy asked me to post this ongoing build project, since including pictures and such in a post is a too strong cuppa tea for his stomach. He will be happy to comment and answer questions..................

    Another 2010 pond installation from start to finish.

    The system described here that will be covered from start to finish has been on the cards for some time now. The outline plans were designed and completed in late summer 2009 but, for a mixture of reasons all outside the control of the client concerned, the actual work could not proceed until May 2010. The filtration system for this design will be by way of six Eric Four units supplied by way of three Eric Twin Four systems.

    BACKGROUND

    This design is another prime example as to why I have always said every pond is unique. For starters the pond is a perfect circle and is the only shape that can possibly compliment the surroundings of this system perfectly. Reasons for saying this is that it is to be installed in the large entrance courtyard of a traditional, listed country estate in the UK and any other shape would simply look out of place.

    As to the shape itself, I have often mentioned that, in terms of efficiency, a perfect circle is the best possible pond shape for any Koi pond - simply because of the possibilities of perfect base performance and perfect current return patterns that can be produced and achieved if designed and installed correctly. For the Koi that will be introduced to the system on completion, it should be the best possible environment for them to grow in perfect shape and health. However, I have also mentioned before that a perfect circle can appear to look visually ‘boring’ in most surroundings but this particular situation is doubtless the exception.

    The pond itself will be, for the most part, an in-ground design but will finish above ground level. It will be installed somewhat centrally in the large courtyard area where visitors can walk around the entire pond freely or sit on the pond walls to enjoy the Koi. Visually it will look very much like the traditional English stately home water features used in the past by the likes of Capability Brown complete with the desired central fountain there for all to see. The difference is that this will be a purpose-built Koi pond and not a shallow unfiltered water feature as in days of old.

    This shows the main residence in the background, the entrance into the courtyard is on the right of the shot.



    The pond itself will be positioned near where the car can be seen and the filtration system and equipment will be concealed some 25 metres distant from the pond to the left of the shot as shown on the next shot.



    The person standing near the van shows where the filtration and equipment housing will be concealed from view.
    The internal dimension of the finished pond will be 8 metres diameter and will have a depth at the centre of 2.25 metres. This will result in a pond water volume of some 23,500 gallons or 107,000 litres.

    In the case of a perfectly circular pond, there is only one choice as to where to position the pond drain/s and that is dead centre. This case is no exception other than the fact that a standard bottom drain is nowhere near man enough to handle this particular pond volume.

    In order to ensure we have the vital ‘one drain to one filter to one pump principle’ on this particular system we need to design and produce a bottom drain that can handle the flow rate required and, at the same time, produce the perfect base vacuum requirements.



    This is the central drain that will supply bottom water to the filtration units; the cigarette pack is there to give an idea of scale.
    The sump itself is 18” (45cms) diameter and the top is 35” (90cms) in diameter.
    It has three 4” diameter pressure socket off-takes and a 1.5” connection for the air supply to the 12” (30cms) central diffuser.




    These three 4” lines will exit the pond and be taken some 25 metres away via two 4” 45 degree elbows towards the much shallower filter housing area. Before they enter the area, each line will be split into two lines as shown on this sketch.
    As a result the central drain will supply six filter units and still retain the ‘one drain to one filter to one pump’ principle.
    I will cover this part of the installation later when progress has been made.




    This is a shot taken just before the excavation to the pond area commenced 03/05/10.
    As soon as the prime 4” concrete base had been poured it was left to set and the next job was to fix four 3” diameter stainless steel legs to the prime base. This was carried out on 10/05/10 and immediately afterwards a second 4” concrete base was poured to secure these legs after a single course of blocks had been laid to the entire perimeter of the pond.

    The four steel legs are longer than required and these will be cut to size once final running water level has been determined. After this, they will be cut to size and a stainless steel table will be welded on top of the legs as a support for the central fountain feature.





    These shots show the base and top bowl of the antique stone fountain that was discovered on an ornamental pond on the estate grounds after purchase of the property.
    The combined weight is considerable and so the stainless legs will be filled with concrete as the build progresses.
    During the build, these fountain parts will be restored to their former glory. As to the actual material they have been made from, it is suspected to be ironstone, which is commonly found in the surrounding areas.





    This was the situation as of 12/05/10 when we went to install the bottom drain and exit pipelines. The initial pipe work and fittings order had arrived ready for use.
    This shows the three 4” drain exit lines and the 1.5” air supply line in place.
    There is another 1” diameter blue alkathene line to fix inside one of the steel legs as a concealed water supply to the fountain.



    The four lines exiting the pond have had fittings simply pushed into position for removal later. All lines will be secured with mortar and prior to the main 6” base being cast, water will be used to fill these lines in order to ensure no flotation takes place during the pour.
    Once the last base has been poured, the pond walls will continue up to 28” (70cms) below final water level and then stop until all the nine 2” bore return lines have been plumbed into place. There are also three pond wall lights to be fitted during the build.

  2. #2
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    UPDATE 17/05/10 til 19/05/10




    The final pond base has been poured and a gentle slope of 30cms (12”) from the vertical walls to a 1.5m diameter (58”) flat central around the drain has been formed.
    The drain top has been placed temporarily to check the fit between the stainless steel legs is perfect.
    Nine pond wall return lines have been fitted all around the pond at 70cms (27”) below final water level and the three pond wall lights have been positioned.
    The pond wall build continues.





    The filter units, air pumps and skimmers are now on site and stored for the moment.





    Final water levels in pond and filtration areas are checked by Theodolite.



    A surface skimmer is being levelled and fixed into position.



    Pipelines continue from pond to filter area.



    These three 4” (110mm) tubes will each be split by a ‘tee’ and two 90 degree elbows to produce six filter feeds from the main drain.



    As the pond walls continue so do the pipeline installations. This only shows the bottom drain lines and the 1.5” air supply line to the central diffuser. There will soon be eleven return lines in 2” (63mm) bore; two blue alkathene lines for the fountain; three 3” (90mm) supply lines from the surface skimmers before the trench can be back-filled.
    All that will be seen when the courtyard is finished will be the circular pond itself. All other equipment will be concealed from view. Obviously this distance between pond and filtration system involves significant pipe runs.
    The flow rate back to the pond from each of the six filter units is only a modest 1,550 gallons (7,000 litres) per hour but the extremely long return run, the fittings used in each line and the entry depth into the pond produces significant friction loss. We need to test several makes of water pump by clamp-on ultrasonic flow meter before making a final choice here.
    Before the stone pond wall cappings can be fixed permanently to the pond walls, the entire pond needs to be rendered and the glass fibre lamination to the pond needs to be completed.

  3. #3
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    UPDATE 21/05/10



    This shows some 3” gravity feed lines from the surface skimmers and 2” return lines from the filters to the pond.





    The lines continue towards the filter and equipment area.



    This shows all lines stopped temporarily to allow for the entire trench to be back-filled. This will then allow the owner to get the surface of the courtyard finished to allow vehicle access.



    The bricklayers are cladding the outside of the pond with reclaimed stone and placing the final coping stones into position before the final surfacing to the courtyard takes place.
    The next stage will be to cut the fountain support legs to size and fill them with concrete. A cross-brace will be fitted to the legs mid-way to give further strength. After this, the pre-drilled fountain base stone will be craned and fitted into the legs and then the fountain itself can be positioned and connected.
    The entire pond surfaces will then be rendered and later laminated with black glass fibre.
    The next stage will be to make a start on the filtration and equipment housing after the other work has finished.

    UPDATE 4/6/10



    This gives some idea as to how the pond will look after surfacing of the courtyard is completed and only the face bricks will be visible.



    As mentioned before, water supply lines for the fountain are inside one of the stainless steel legs. After the four legs had been filled with concrete, a cross-brace of 1” stainless bar was welded just to be sure of the strength of the supports.
    The octagonal stone that is now the base of the fountain was cut to size and core drilled underneath at the exact points to allow the four legs to sit inside the stone itself. The two fountain parts were then placed on top of the base as shown.
    Final water level will be near the top of the base stone.
    The finished pond base has a flat circular area of 1.5 metres diameter around the central drain and the gentle slope of 30cms commenced from the vertical pond walls to finish at the circumference of the flat area.






    The capping stones were all cut to shape and size from stones reclaimed from other structures no longer required.
    The specification of glass fibre laminating could have been finished in two clear days but rain stopped play on one day, in the end it was a three-day job.





    Whilst the glass fibre was curing and setting, the pond had to be covered. Normally this would be a piece of cake but, in this case, there was a tall fountain to be considered!



    Unfortunately we had run completely out of skyhooks that day and so young Cameron unluckily drew the short straw!
    Don’t blame me, I’m only the designer.





    This shows Matt about to be elevated in order to get the sheet atop of the fountain. The heavy stone in his hand is to anchor the sheet inside the bowl of the fountain.



    This shows the base and drainage lines for the area where the filters and all equipment will be housed.



    This shows another pond finally underway after planning has now been granted. This is a four-drain design and the bottom drain feeds to the four Eric Four units can be seen outside the pond near to the bricklayers.
    I will do more on this system separately later as things progress.

  4. #4
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    UPDATE 2/7/10

    Fortunately the filter units could be installed whilst the first fill of the pond commenced. Once again, there are six 4” lines entering from the custom-made special bottom drain and each line enters its own dedicated ‘Eric Four’ filter unit.
    It is worth mentioning that the Eric units operate as fully stand-alone filters, NO other items are necessary either before or after these boxes.

    The U/V systems and heating systems are supplied their water from pumps powering the surface skimmers on the pond.

    When this installation is finally completed and the large courtyard finished it will be easy to walk or drive around the entire pond. Those viewing the pond really only wish to see the pond, the water and the Koi – the very last thing anyone should wish to see are filter boxes; air pumps; water pumps; pipelines; valves; U/V units; electrical power lines; heat exchangers etc. etc.

    This is the reason as to why the filter area has been tucked some 25 metres away in the corner shown. Eventually there will be a building around it with access door that matches the adjoining office building in order to disguise it further.
    (Admittedly I am greatly ‘miffed’ that my truly magnificent black boxes will be hidden from the view of all who see the pond. I have considered putting a very inconspicuous and tasty neon flashing sign on top of the fountain, you know, around 2m x 2m that revolves endlessly and flashes out ‘Filtered by Eric’ in different colours – but somehow I do not think that this is what the owner has in mind. – pity!)

    Because of this distance between pond and filtration area, whilst there are no problems in supplying each unit with water by gravity from the pond drain, it does necessitate using return water pumps that are man enough to get the 1,500 gallons (6,800 litres) per hour of water back through the 2” bore lines to the returns in the pond wall which enter at 70cms below water level and are spaced evenly around the entire pond perimeter.
    (In a normal situation where the pond is near to the filter system, 1,500 gallons per hour is, of course, child’s play to achieve. However, in this installation the friction loss produced by the long pipelines, the necessary fittings and the resistance of the pond water pressure at 70cms below the surface requires water pumps that can deliver much more than standard pond pumps.)

    ‘Techie Stuff’.

    I need a total pond turnover (through the filters only) of once in every 2.5 hours in order to give the required dwell time in and through the EricMat blocks and that computes to a little over 1,500 gallons per hour to each river. (23,000 gallons pond divided by 2.5 hours gives 9,200 gallons per hour - divided by 6 for each unit = 1,533 gallons per hour per unit.)

    Bearing in mind that each ‘Eric Four’ river holds 114 gallons (510 litres) and water travels through each river as a forward-moving 20” x 20” (50cms x 50cms) ‘Block of Water’, the time taken from start of box to end of box (One ‘PASS’) is 4.6 minutes - or a little over 13 ‘Passes’ per hour and 312 per day at this flow rate.
    As each river is 80” (203cms) long, the ‘endless flow’ through each river means the block of water travels a little over 2,000 feet per day through each river giving an annual travel of 143 miles. In this installation there are six rivers so the total travel per year on this system is 863 miles.

    Having mentioned on the ‘Flow Patterns’ page that the moving block in Eric units is 85% efficient as to ensuring incoming pond water comes into contact with the biological media before it exits, there will still be an estimated 15% of motionless (useless) water in each unit at all times. In Eric units this is almost irrelevant, as each river (lavatory) will be completely discharged (flushed) to waste every 24 hours. This means 680 gallons per day on 23,000 gallons in warm water, high stocking and heavy feeding times or maximum demand on the system. In lower demand situations – cooler water/low stocking/moderate feeding etc. then each river can be discharged every two days which means that 340 gallons per day will be discharged to waste.

    If we take maximum demand periods as an example, 680 gallons each day is only 3% of the total pond volume. The circular pond depth is 80” (2.05m) deep and 680 gallons represents a 2.4” drop in water level after a total discharge of all six units (0.4” per unit). Even with a total discharge of all six units the water pumps are still in full prime and ready to be switched on again without any time wasted waiting for ‘topping up’!
    It is vital for the efficiency of the backwash to the brush boxes that the 4” bore drain outlet is kept to that bore. Assuming this to be the case (as it is in this installation) then the total time taken to empty and re-fill each unit from pump stop to pump start is a fraction over one minute. In this example of six rivers facing maximum demand situations it takes 6.5 minutes per day in order to maintain all rivers as becoming ‘brand new’ on a daily basis.

    Do consider once more that there are 312 ‘PASSES’ through one river in any day and each ‘PASS’ takes 4.6 minutes. The one-minute discharge time only represents 25% of one pass and that will ensure total cleanliness of the part of the system where wastewater should be removed from, namely ‘the lavatory’. Incidentally, these units cannot block or overflow even if left unattended for some months, however this is not recommended at all. Just consider a lavatory in use every day without being flushed!
    Replacement mains water is trickled in constantly to bring the system back to just over final level with some tiny excess to pass to waste via the overflow. In this installation the trickle will be set to 700 gallons per day at maximum demand times which is 0.5 gallons per minute. Mains water purification units are not necessary on Eric systems.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Incidentally, I am well aware of what is required to install such a system and also painfully aware that there are few around with the ‘nouse’ of young Matt Cameron who is the guy responsible for this work of art – which it is. Some weeks back I re-named him ‘Filter Matt’ – the highest accolade I could come up with!
    Filter Matt was on duty on my stand at the National Show recently and I overheard him mention to someone that he knew far more about Eric than I did!
    (The Fool – he needs bringing down a peg or three!)
    Of course, I could have done all this in half the time had I not been extremely busy with my latest venture as authorised area distributor for Surecut Spades!





















    UPDATE 10/7/10

    The wooden surround to the filter area is a temporary thing to try and deter gypsies from nicking even more stuff than they already have. When the filter installation is complete, a stone building will hide the area completely and blend in with the other buildings. Like I said before, we only want to see pond, water & Koi.





    From past experiences, I always get pangs of anxiety when someone says ‘My builders will do the build part of it.’ This one is the exception; the guys who built this are craftsmen who know exactly what they are doing. Now I have seen these pictures of the courtyard versus what I saw on my first visit – I am simply blown away and it’s not nearly finished yet. I have watched these guys working and they make it look so simple as it all takes shape before me.



    From the outset I knew that, despite the fact I only needed around 1,500gph through each black box, the water pumps required to return the water to the pond some 25 meters away would have to be much more than the run-of-the-mill ‘pond pumps’.
    Initially I ordered only one of these units and crossed my fingers whilst Matt put it to the test. Although, in terms of size, it is a very tiny unit - it can be programmed to increase output delivery right up to 4,000gph at a nine-foot head! When the others arrive Matt will set each one to the deliveries required for each as all return lines vary in degrees as to friction-loss. Hopefully when all pumps are running as required we will get the very gentle spin that’s needed to take all debris and toxins directly to the central drain sump and thence to the filters for processing.







    As to the fountain, there are two 1” alkathene lines supplying water to it via two separate small pressure pumps that take their supply from one surface skimmer. One will overflow the bowl of the fountain and the other will power the fountain head above it.
    The U/V system will be supplied water from another surface skimmer and the third skimmer will supply the heat exchangers required.
    Incidentally, I’ll say it again, young Cameron is a genius!








    More to follow.......

    Waddy

  5. #5
    Daihonmei
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    beautiful water feature! I am a bit worried about those long runs of piping however. I'd get a few flow meters in line there to see what happens and a few clean outs midway so as to flush those dain lengths of the inevitable 'ozze' that will build up from settlement and biofilm 'cementing' that will occur over time. Trying to be useful, JR

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    Quote Originally Posted by JasPR View Post
    beautiful water feature! I am a bit worried about those long runs of piping however. I'd get a few flow meters in line there to see what happens and a few clean outs midway so as to flush those dain lengths of the inevitable 'ozze' that will build up from settlement and biofilm 'cementing' that will occur over time. Trying to be useful, JR
    Always great to get vital filtration advice from a financial adviser.

    Glad to hear you like the water feature, by the way it is also a superb Koi pond below the water.

    I do hear what you advise regarding in-line flowmeters and I thank you for that but those items are so 'last season' and they do restrict flow to a trickle.

    As to build-up of your favourite word of the month 'biofilm' - do you have your calculator at the ready?

    Good, we''ll start.

    Let's go with the largest bore feed line of 4" and bear in mind it is 80 feet long.

    Unless I'm much mistaken that holds around 43 UK gallons.
    Now that line is flowing gently at a rate of 1,700gph.
    The said 43 gallons passes through that 80' tube around 40 times in one hour.

    Are we in agreement?

    Now, an Eric Four unit holds 110 gallons - a meagre amount indeed.
    As you know, I dump the entire unit daily when the filter is empty.
    Understand?

    When I lift the standpipe to re-fill, 110 gallons RUSHES through that 80' pipe in LESS THAN ONE MINUTE. That is almost three times of the pipe capacity in less than a minute.

    Now, do consider once again, (I know it's taxing) this is done EVERY SINGLE DAY.

    In your professional opinion as a financial adviser - is this adequate?

    Please advise, I'd hate to make any errors.

    Oh, by the way, when you are designing and installing all your ponds and filter systems in your lunch hour, I would update your equipment - things have moved on over the past three decades.

    Advertise your in-line flow meters on eBay and pop out to get a couple of ultrasonic clamp-on meters. You do not have to cut tube any more to install them, you simply apply the gel (supplied) to the tube in question then you clamp on the sensor. Adjust the readout to US gallons on the display and watch the digits. If it's not to your liking then adjust the ball valve after the pump until it's 'absolutely spiffing and tickety boo' as we say over here.

    Thanks again and if you ever need any advice on financial matters - Ill be only too happy to oblige.

    My name is Peter Waddington.

  7. #7
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    That is some SERIOUS Koi pond!!
    Thanks for sharing, the pictures were great!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by waddy View Post
    Always great to get vital filtration advice from a financial adviser.

    Glad to hear you like the water feature, by the way it is also a superb Koi pond below the water.

    I do hear what you advise regarding in-line flowmeters and I thank you for that but those items are so 'last season' and they do restrict flow to a trickle.

    As to build-up of your favourite word of the month 'biofilm' - do you have your calculator at the ready?

    Good, we''ll start.

    Let's go with the largest bore feed line of 4" and bear in mind it is 80 feet long.

    Unless I'm much mistaken that holds around 43 UK gallons.
    Now that line is flowing gently at a rate of 1,700gph.
    The said 43 gallons passes through that 80' tube around 40 times in one hour.

    Are we in agreement?

    Now, an Eric Four unit holds 110 gallons - a meagre amount indeed.
    As you know, I dump the entire unit daily when the filter is empty.
    Understand?

    When I lift the standpipe to re-fill, 110 gallons RUSHES through that 80' pipe in LESS THAN ONE MINUTE. That is almost three times of the pipe capacity in less than a minute.

    Now, do consider once again, (I know it's taxing) this is done EVERY SINGLE DAY.

    In your professional opinion as a financial adviser - is this adequate?

    Please advise, I'd hate to make any errors.

    Oh, by the way, when you are designing and installing all your ponds and filter systems in your lunch hour, I would update your equipment - things have moved on over the past three decades.

    Advertise your in-line flow meters on eBay and pop out to get a couple of ultrasonic clamp-on meters. You do not have to cut tube any more to install them, you simply apply the gel (supplied) to the tube in question then you clamp on the sensor. Adjust the readout to US gallons on the display and watch the digits. If it's not to your liking then adjust the ball valve after the pump until it's 'absolutely spiffing and tickety boo' as we say over here.

    Thanks again and if you ever need any advice on financial matters - Ill be only too happy to oblige.

    My name is Peter Waddington.
    Sorry "My Name IS Peter Waddington" ( you pompous wind bag) , didn't realize this was a 'shut up and sit down' section of the boards. I'll let the other folks O and ahh, I thought the Flemming invitation was to discuss the 'technical aspects' of the design. But I get it now, same tricks the last batch of filters was built on when we were all 'more or less in on it'--- so I'll dummy up. new generation, new pockets to pick----

    The thing I just still don't get is with all the extensive excavation and concrete work (I mean the entire property is one large combination of 'endurable stone' and concrete work) why the owner would stop at the filter bays and substitute plastic bins for the more substantial version of chamber bays in concrete ? Seems ‘asymmetrical’?? No? Did he run out of funds or go over budget?? JR

  9. #9
    Honmei KoiCop's Avatar
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    Since this isn't a customer bragging about their new build I'm curious:

    Is there any part of Peter's website you don't intend to copy and paste onto Bito, thereby contravening the requirement to pay advertising fees?

    Best wishes,

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasPR View Post
    Sorry "My Name IS Peter Waddington" ( you pompous wind bag) , didn't realize this was a 'shut up and sit down' section of the boards. I'll let the other folks O and ahh, I thought the Flemming invitation was to discuss the 'technical aspects' of the design. But I get it now, same tricks the last batch of filters was built on when we were all 'more or less in on it'--- so I'll dummy up. new generation, new pockets to pick----

    The thing I just still don't get is with all the extensive excavation and concrete work (I mean the entire property is one large combination of 'endurable stone' and concrete work) why the owner would stop at the filter bays and substitute plastic bins for the more substantial version of chamber bays in concrete ? Seems ‘asymmetrical’?? No? Did he run out of funds or go over budget?? JR
    Do I detect the distinct and unmistakable taste of "sour grapes?"

    This pond is a thing of beauty, n'est-ce pas?

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