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Thread: Mud Pond Design

  1. #1
    Sansai
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Michigan, USA
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    249

    Mud Pond Design

    In reading through a number of mud pond threads one thing I have not seen discussed, or even mentioned is ease of seining.

    From pulling many seines single handed, and with a couple helpers doing stream surveys I am wondering how the forum members view this?

    Is it a given in the designs that the pond will be pumped down to seine or pull a seine through however it can be done? From experience more then 4' deep is a real hunk of work. Even 3' is work if workers are few.

    Looking at pics of breeders in Japan and here in the states seining is a real life factor. What about your mud ponds?

    Jake Levi

    Oswego, NY
    We are all in this together
    Jake Levi
    Oswego, NY

    We are all in this together

  2. #2
    Daihonmei PapaBear's Avatar
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    Oct 2005
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    Davenport, Oklahoma
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    6,726
    I don't have one of my own, but 2 friends who do that I've helped with pond pulls. The biggest issues revolve around depth, edges free from obstacles, and bottom free from heavy vegetation.

    One of my buddies has a large pond that is about 14' deep at the center To avoid pumping it all the way down we've tried to get the net in place at the deep end and fire up the feeding at the shallow end to trick the Koi into shallow water as we draw the net toward them. 50/50 success is about the best we could get that way.

    On the other mudpond keeping the cattails around the banks under control has been a real headache, making pumping down to an extra low depth essential. It worked out great most years, but one year we hit a snag. A short carpet of some plant I don't know the name of set up housekeeping on the bottom of the pond. The water was great and the Koi came out looking wonderful, so the owner decided not to drain and dry to see if letting the vegetation overwinter and putting the Koi back the following spring would work out. When we tried to pull the pond the next year that stuff had grown thick and tall enough that we were unable to retrieve a single Koi as they simply swam below the net as it could not go to the bottom. The SMALLEST of these Koi was over 24" with the largest ladies running between 32"-36" and the only way they were eventually caught was to pump the water down to the point that they could be individually bagged by a fellow club member wading through the thick carpet.
    Larry Iles
    Oklahoma

  3. #3
    eds
    eds is offline
    Sansai
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Nottingham, UK
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    I saw some very cleverly designed ones at a tilapia farm in Uganda last year. The owner had designed all of his ponds with a slowly sloping floor that was as flat as possible. At the deep end he positioned a standpipe that functioned as an overflow in normal use. For harvesting small fish (smaller than the size of the standpipe) he simply positioned a net after the drain pipe and pulled the standpipe! All the tilapia ended up in the net in the drain chamber.

    Not that I'd want to do that with valuable koi of course but the idea of a sloping pool and a standpipe for drainage would be pretty easy to do I would have thought.

    A friend of mine also has lots of giant duckweed (not Salvinia, just turbo-charged Lemna!) and water hyacinths on his mud ponds to help reduce the rooted vegetation that can grow in the ponds to make netting a little easier as well as improving the water quality in the ponds.

  4. #4
    Sansai
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Michigan, USA
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    249

    pond design

    Hi Larry

    These are the kinds of things I was thinking about, I have tried to seine river pools too many times with limbs, logs and heavy brush or vegetation in or on the sides.

    Photos and videos I have seen of breeder ponds here and in Japan show all edges clean and shallow water on the sides when harvesting. I am giving thought to some mud ponds but they will be smaller, 50-60,000 gallons.

    But I am wondering how others plan to seine fish in theirs. Or do they not plan for it?

    Jake

    Oswego, NY
    We are all in this together
    Last edited by Jake Levi; 08-18-2010 at 12:22 PM. Reason: spelling

  5. #5
    Sansai
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    249

    sloped ponds and standpipes

    Hi Ed

    I have done that with ponds for growing out mono sex tilapia, when harvest size just pull the standpipe, it works very well, it could work with a 2 piece pipe which could have the top unscrewed from say or 2 or 3' high bottom standpipe to concentrate the Koi.

    Any mud pond I build will have sloping floor for sure.

    Jake

    Oswego, NY
    We are all in this together

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