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Thread: 10 to 12 thousand gallon pond build

  1. #141
    Sansai
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    Slow going, had an incident this morning took up 1/2 the day... but got a little more on the wall done.. Sorry if I'm that guy that posts pictures after every shovel full of dirt I pull out of the ground. I started in the spring of 2011, hope to have this bad boy up and running come spring of 2014.
    -Mike
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 10 to 12 thousand gallon pond build-quartz-stone-laying-day-2.jpg  

  2. #142
    Oyagoi Flounder's Avatar
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    Looking at post #120, it looks like this was a gunite pond not shotcrete. Is this right?

  3. #143
    Sansai
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flounder View Post
    Looking at post #120, it looks like this was a gunite pond not shotcrete. Is this right?
    No it was Shotcrete. it came from the concrete plant mixed with about 3 1/2" slump, like 8 bag mix. They used a compressor to spray the concrete through the hose.-Mike

  4. #144
    Jumbo Appliance Guy's Avatar
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    So the other night I got curious on the differences in Gunite and Shotcrete. Spent way too long reading forums and websites.... and I'm still confused!

    There is much misuse of both terms. From what I gather- both contain a pump, a hose, a manifold, mix, and water. The primary differences are Gunite is dry and is mixed with water and air at the manifold; and shotcrete is premixed and is pumped into the manifold wet. Which is stronger depends on the application. For structure purposes like a bridge, dry mixed has greater strength. For low strength uses such as a koi pond- wet may provide easier workability, yet still be structurally sound. One thing I picked up on is that BOTH require skill to install properly. There is actually certification on this kind of stuff and most sites recommend having a certified professional do the installation. This would not be a good DIY project, imo...

  5. #145
    Sansai
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    Quote Originally Posted by Appliance Guy View Post
    So the other night I got curious on the differences in Gunite and Shotcrete. Spent way too long reading forums and websites.... and I'm still confused!

    There is much misuse of both terms. From what I gather- both contain a pump, a hose, a manifold, mix, and water. The primary differences are Gunite is dry and is mixed with water and air at the manifold; and shotcrete is premixed and is pumped into the manifold wet. Which is stronger depends on the application. For structure purposes like a bridge, dry mixed has greater strength. For low strength uses such as a koi pond- wet may provide easier workability, yet still be structurally sound. One thing I picked up on is that BOTH require skill to install properly. There is actually certification on this kind of stuff and most sites recommend having a certified professional do the installation. This would not be a good DIY project, imo...
    Definitely not!!!! After watching the process take place (I Have some videos if someone wants to see) But after watching them I feel I could've done the rebar portion of it. But the spray takes a very special kind of person. If you don't aim it just right the wall will collapse. You have to be the right distance and at the right angle. I seen a wall collapse twice and I was asking the "pumper" guy if that happens a lot. He told me the guy I had is the best at what he does in the surrounding states and he has "pumped" for a few others who just don't have the touch. As far as shotcrete? It was all prepared and mixed at the concrete plant and brought out to my house in 3 cement trucks. Each had 8 cubic yards of concrete. The concrete truck dumps his load into a Hopper, The hopper is on the back of truck the the pumper guy operates. Apparently the hopper has a 3" hose attached and a pump to shove the concrete through the hose. The pump pushes the concrete through the hose. The manifold at the end has a valve to push the air through to shoot the concrete. Without the air the concrete would just pour out the end of the hose... So when ready to shoot the concrete he would wave for the pumper to start pumping then he would open the valve for the compressed air to shoot the concrete. I hope that made sense... Oh P.S. just lifting the 3" hose full of concrete is heavy, but to control it and hold it for hours? would just be TOUGH! Definitely hire this portion of your build out. -Mike

  6. #146
    Sansai
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    Work and weather really tend to get in the way of making progress..... stacking these little stones and making them fit is quite the challenge as well. -Mike
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 10 to 12 thousand gallon pond build-quartz-starting-skimmer.jpg  

  7. #147
    Sansai
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    Filling it up to check for leaks (just in the pond)... all pipes leading inside are capped off. It looks so pretty, makes me want to work hard and fast to make sure this thing will be in full operation by spring 2014
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 10 to 12 thousand gallon pond build-filling-checking-leaks-10-2013.jpg  

  8. #148
    Honmei ricshaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Appliance Guy View Post
    So the other night I got curious on the differences in Gunite and Shotcrete. Spent way too long reading forums and websites.... and I'm still confused!
    There is much misuse of both terms. From what I gather- both contain a pump, a hose, a manifold, mix, and water. The primary differences are Gunite is dry and is mixed with water and air at the manifold; and shotcrete is premixed and is pumped into the manifold wet. Which is stronger depends on the application. For structure purposes like a bridge, dry mixed has greater strength. For low strength uses such as a koi pond- wet may provide easier workability, yet still be structurally sound. One thing I picked up on is that BOTH require skill to install properly. There is actually certification on this kind of stuff and most sites recommend having a certified professional do the installation. This would not be a good DIY project, imo...
    I have heard that Gunite is dry and is mixed with water and air at the manifold.

    On my second pond, which I still have, I used Shotcrete. If you have ever used a concrete pumping service, you can visualize better Shotcrete. In my experiences, when using a concrete pumping service, the concrete pump shows up first and sets up. They have to lay out the thick rubber hose and get ready for the concrete ready mix truck. When using a concrete pump you need a "concrete pump mix" which is different from regular concrete. In general, concrete pump mix is a little more runny (more water) and contain only pea gravel (no rocks) so that it can be pump through a long hose. With Shotcrete, the difference was there was a nozzle on the end of the concrete pump hose with an air hose connected to a big air compressor back on the street next to the concrete pump.



    This video will give you an idea of my experience, except the Shotcrete guys were set up well in advance of the cement truck arrival.


  9. #149
    Jumbo Appliance Guy's Avatar
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    How's it goin Mike?

  10. #150
    Sansai
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    Not bad, I'm in the process of hanging a sub panel (125 amp load center) with 12-24 circuits. Also tore down a wall from the waterfall area planning to make this bigger. I had to pour in some blocks to finish my pond wall so I can hang more quartz stone Vermeer. Almost done digging my filter pit, next step will be to make forms and pour a footer, then start building walls. LOL I HAVE SO MUCH MORE TO DO. I filled up my pond and NO leaks, I had 4 baby koi I threw in there cause the little tank they were in wouldn't of made it through the winter. I moved my 150 gallon skippy filter I've been running my little pond off and put in a BD cover with 9" diffuser and am running my 100 watt air pump through it. I moved my 6 big koi in here for the winter. I couldn't help myself! I've been waiting 3 years to see this full of water and fish in it!!! Well now I will finish the filter pit and try to get everything ready to go, then next spring get a holding tank, pull all the fish out and cut off all my BD's, TPR's and all pipes leading into the pond, then fill it up and place fish back in after I know all my plumbing is working right. It's a slow process, but still shooting for spring to have this thing all up and running and BUILT! I can't wait to get to the waterfall area.... Hoping to make that the focal point of the pond. -Mike

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