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Thread: Pond filtration - nitrate filtration

  1. #1
    Sansai
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    Pond filtration - nitrate filtration

    Good day All,

    Could somebody please tell me how to take care of nitrates in my pond

    Preferable using a tried and tested DIY filter design. Drawing would be nice.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Tategoi
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    There are only a couple of ways to get rid nitrates/NO3...dilution is the simplest one, lots of water changes...2nd a ton of plants and all the hassle that goes with them..the 3rd is de-nitrification and not really a great thing is a backyard puddle....

    change water

  3. #3
    MCA
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    Honmei MCA's Avatar
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    There is no silver bullet filter that will end up giving you zero nitrates...unless you plan on nuking the water with ozone (O3), which is definitely not cheap nor recommended.

    So need a different balance between the load (number/size of fish, amount of food being fed), filtration (pressurized, non pressurized chambers, wet/dry..etc), aeration (you want saturation for the temp), and water changes. As Graham was point at....dilution is the solution to pollution. Doing the other things can slow down the accumulation of pollution. But ultimately nothing reduces pollution like a good old fashioned water change. Plan on at least 10% a week.
    Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

  4. #4
    Fry
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    Anoxic filtration is the way to for nitrates to be converted, Syd Michell K.O.i. has come really good articles on this method of filtration. The oxygen molecule is stolen from nitrate in the filter system and then is gassed off. The nitrate is converted from N3 to N2.

  5. #5
    MCA
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    I remember when Dr. Kevin Novak introduced anoxic filtration at a Koi Health Seminar many years ago. We all looked at each other and wondered why he doesn't just do a water change and solve so many more pollution problems besides Nitrates....which are a small problem. I am not about to give away square meters of yard or filter pit for anoxic baskets that could be better used for other things. Ask yourself how many producers of the finest koi in the world in Japan get by without anoxic baskets?

  6. #6
    Fry
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    Their are many methods to reduce nitrates

    Water changes are one way to knock nitrates back.
    Ozone will help amonia, nitrites, and nitrates 260-320mv
    Some keepers do not have water that can be wasted down the drain(water meter police). Some keepers do a 800 gal,waterchange on 23,900gal/day

  7. #7
    MCA
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    Water changes are one way to knock nitrates back.
    Yes, that is the way Mother Nature deals with it in an open system. If I wee do expensive O3, I would be dialing in 350mV on the controller and have serious aeration...just in case. As it is my pond's nitrate level is usually 40ppm or less. I would not be too worried about nitrate unless the level was in the 80ppm range or higher and started that way. Then some special action would be a good idea to prevent long term stress.

  8. #8
    Fry
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    ozone equipment purchase can off set one vet bill with injections. I have found some fish are just sickly just like people. Ozone kills bacteria, virus, parisites, attacks ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. If o.r.p. is set too high koi can be dammaged over the long run by burning their gills. How o3 is introduced is very bad if it'still introduced with air stone directly. Mixing in a camber or a venturi with adequate piping so the o3 can gas off and koi do not get direct contact. I have seen ulcers heal, a series of bacterial infections go away with o3. Also have seen some fish only survive with heavy o3 and fall apart in a community environment with o3 present. I believe the fish don't know any better and will gulp bubbles their by burning their gills. Every living organism benifits by the additional 02 after 03 is finished oxidizing matter.

  9. #9
    Fry
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    ozone equipment purchase can off set one vet bill with injections. I have found some fish are just sickly just like people. Ozone kills bacteria, virus, parisites, attacks ammonia, nitrites and nitrates. If o.r.p. is set too high koi can be dammaged over the long run by burning their gills. How o3 is introduced is very bad if it'still introduced with air stone directly. Mixing in a camber or a venturi with adequate piping so the o3 can gas off and koi do not get direct contact. I have seen ulcers heal, a series of bacterial infections go away with o3. Also have seen some fish only survive with heavy o3 and fall apart in a community environment with o3 present. I believe the fish don't know any better and will gulp bubbles their by burning their gills. Every living organism benifits by the additional 02 after 03 is finished oxidizing matter.

  10. #10
    Oyagoi yerrag's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MCA View Post
    I remember when Dr. Kevin Novak introduced anoxic filtration at a Koi Health Seminar many years ago. We all looked at each other and wondered why he doesn't just do a water change and solve so many more pollution problems besides Nitrates....which are a small problem. I am not about to give away square meters of yard or filter pit for anoxic baskets that could be better used for other things. Ask yourself how many producers of the finest koi in the world in Japan get by without anoxic baskets?
    A properly working anoxic system definitely reduces nitrate levels in the pond. At 3% daily water change, I can manage to have nitrates go down to 10 ppm. In my j-mat system before I converted, I'd be happy to get 40ppm with same water change frequency and volume. As in any filter setup, fines management is an issue. If fines are allowed to accumulate for too long, the biofiltration capability can be impaired, not just with nitrates, but also with ammonia and nitrites. In this aspect, j-mats are more forgiving. With fines properly managed and controlled though, these drawbacks of anoxic filtration are addressed.

    It can't be argued that users of anoxic filtration can't raise finest koi. It's easier to argue that anoxic filtration is relatively new, that changing to a newer system is challenging for most people. Since most purveyors of new technology tend to be dealers, dealers won't push new technology if there's no money in it for them. Anoxic filtration, as Rob pointed out, is a DIY-capable system, and most dealers, and breeders, like Momotaro, really don't think it makes business sense for them to stab themselves in the back.

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