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Thread: Polyurea sprayed in a dirt hole on geo-textile fabric

  1. #11
    Tosai sumthinfishys's Avatar
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    Apr 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich L View Post
    It's done a lot. If you want an extremely strong liner without any folds it's the way to go but it's not cheap.

    Why don't you want a gunnite, etc. pond with the polyurea as a coating. That's the best way. And don't pay attention to those folks who say other coatings are as reliable, they're not.

    There is a trade off in long term reliability when choosing the cheaper rout.
    Maybe some of us due to $$$.
    I have three kids and make less than 50k.

    Mike C

  2. #12
    Tosai
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    This is not an advertisement, but it will appear that way. In any event, we offer a DIY Polyurea system called Pond Shiled-FSP. If you take a look at the Pond Armor website, you'll see it under the appropriate link. There's also pictures too. Not including the cost of the gun, you could apply the material at about $3.65 per sqaure foot for Pond Shield-FSP and the proper geotextile fabric. Again, sorry if this sounds like an advertisement, it's just like you guys sounded like you were poking around trying to find alternatives.
    Thanks,
    Butch
    Pond Armor

  3. #13
    Sansai
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    169
    Dear Butch

    REally, less than 4 bucks a foot? And how thick pray tell is your coating on the cloth? Keep in mind one of the formost cloth sprayers in the USA recomends no less than 200 mils on cloth.

    And you can do that for less than 4 bucks a foot? And it is really polyurea? And how do you put such an expensive product into a small tube system(which costs about $8 a cartrige set empty) and spray a whole pond with the polyurea and keep the prices so low?

    I really want to learn more! Educate me!

    d

  4. #14
    Tosai
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Well I won't give away my own trade secrets, but yes, less than $4 per square foot. As far as thickness is concerned, there are varying opinions on this. Some people spray as little as 50mils while others spray thicker than 200 mils. We recommend at least 50 mils, minimum, but you are free to spray it as thick as you like. If you look at the Pond Shield-FSP application page on our web site, that installation is 50 mils. That particular installer was placing flagstone and he dropped a piece that weighed about 45-50 pounds, sharp edge first into a lower tier. He was shocked when he picked the rock up and the coating was not even marred. Could the coating have been damaged? Yes, it could have, but it survived and he told me later that is wasn't the first rock he dropped on the liner throughout the job. I guess moving the rocks can get heavy after a while.

    In any event, how we package and create our materials is something I can't share, but what we want to accomplish here is to bring Polyurea to people who normally would not be able to use it otherwise. Homeowners with smaller ponds where an installer with a large rig would prefer not to drag all of his/her equipment out and smaller budgets where cost plays a major roll for the pond owner. Not to mention those installers that wish to create a Polyurea pond but can't afford the expense of any of those large rigs.

    What matters most in a DIY job like this is that you as the newbie installer, be meticulous, pay close attention to detail, follow instructions and use the proper materials. For instance, you wouldn't just spray the material to colorize the geotextile fabric. You are coating the fabric not painting it. This means you need to apply a consistent amount of material so as to not miss anything which would become a leak later. Paying close attention to detail is equally as important. You want to decide as you go where you might need more material or making sure you sprayed your seams properly. Any mis-sprayed seam or area that is weak because of a lack of material will probably cause you troubles later. You must also follow the instructions and not skip steps or take shortcuts. Too many times people are willing to just start pulling things out of boxes and moving forward in a project without even glancing at the instructions. The instructions are written so as to give you the best chances of success. Follow them. Finally using the proper material. For instance, choosing the proper geotextile fabric. You can't just go purchase any old weed barrier or felt cloth. I spoke to a member of the PDA and he said that when tested a geotextile fabric like a Propex fabric we currently offer gave the best results.

    Butch
    Pond Armor

  5. #15
    Sansai
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    169
    Damn,

    That is just too interesting. What training do you offer the do it yourselfer. And what warranty on the product?

  6. #16
    Tosai
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    Feb 2006
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    Training can be anything from the instructions that come with each unit along with phone tech support, to the DVD that we are completing, to actual on site consultation. Everything but the onsite consultation is at no additional cost to you. As far as the warranty is concerned, our materials can easily see 25+ years of service. Installation warranty is on the installer.
    Butch
    Pond Armor

  7. #17
    Sansai
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    Training can be anything from the instructions that come with each unit
    By each unit, are you talking about the product or the application gizmo?

  8. #18
    Sansai
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    May 2005
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    You can't just go purchase any old weed barrier or felt cloth.
    Why not? Are they not as strong?

  9. #19
    Tosai
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    33
    Yes, applicator gun essentially. As far as the geotextile fabric, they all react differently. Felt for instance will soak up a bunch of material and be more susceptible to pin holes. Gray weed barrier is too flimsy.
    Butch
    Pond Armor

  10. #20
    Sansai
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    169
    Hey Butch

    Been thinking a bit. If it is all that easy, then why do the applicators need to take classes and training to put it down? Or is that just a ploy to keep the prices of polyurea so high only the super rich can afford it?

    So, you are saying that if you properly put down the spray you provide, 50 mils will be more than enough to seal a pond? I might have to put in an order myself.

    Any way you could send me some more information, or the instruction manual. When it comes to hands on, I can usually hold my own. But I dont know about something like this.

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