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Thread: DIY filter systems?

  1. #1
    Tosai
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    Oct 2007
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    Smile DIY filter systems?

    I have completed my pond liner and filled it up. It is smaller than originally planned but still decent for a first larger pond. It comes in at 6800 gallons. I built it deeper than expected too, at 5 feet instead of the planned 4 foot.
    Can anyone help suggest a pump & diy filter system for it? I need to stay on the low price of this if there is such thing lol. I need to design something that is for one, well hide-able, quiet and aesthetically pleasing as the system will have to be right next to the seating area that will be built for viewing. Last thing i want is some giant thing looking like a bunch of junk and sounding like a peaking pipe! lol.......Most the Diy filter systems ive seen are very goddie looking. Any help and links to such would be greatly appriciated! I will try to post a pic later of the pond to give a better perspective on where it has been placed.

  2. #2
    Oyagoi CarolinaGirl's Avatar
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    Here's a link to a DIY filter I built. The problem you may have is that you have a lot of water....and that water needs to be filtered. So you will not be able to get away with a little, easy to hide filter system. Big pond = big filtration. This one I build is 1/2 of the filtration for my 9000 gallon pond. It works very well.

    New Static And Fluid Kaldnes Filter (diy) - KoiShack

  3. #3
    Tosai
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    Oct 2007
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    Yes bigger pond equals bigger filter. Im looking for something that maybe is low profile ex. partially in ground or something like that. I checked out your filter deal. Have you worked out all the bugs yet? I have 2 plastic 55 gal drums with lids which use screw on lid rings to seal them,,,,just in case i would need to utilize them for some part of a filter system. Oh ya, i also have 4 cubic feet of bio bead material.

  4. #4
    Oyagoi CarolinaGirl's Avatar
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    The only bug with my filter that I have found is the suction pipe for the pump does not need to extend up into the bio-chamber. It sucks a lot of bubbles with the water. I am building 2 more sets and the pump suction will just come into the barrel below the grating and stop there. Water will pull thru the perforated grating and most of the bubbles should stay above it.

  5. #5
    Jumbo
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlbspd View Post
    I have completed my pond liner and filled it up. It is smaller than originally planned but still decent for a first larger pond. It comes in at 6800 gallons. I built it deeper than expected too, at 5 feet instead of the planned 4 foot.
    One or two bottom drains? One skimmer? Do you have TPRs? And a waterfall?

  6. #6
    Tosai
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    Oct 2007
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    I do not have a waterfall at this time... maybe in future. I have one bottom drain, one skimmer and a 3 way valve to control flow between the skimmer and bottom drain. I want to keep the pump somewhat close to the pond to prevent extra head pressure......I have at my desposal right now without making a trip to the local hardware store, 4 cubic feet of poly floating beads, (3) 55 gal drums and a box of bio ribbon, 40watt UV filter, a canister pool filter with 2" plumbing, have access to a pool bead filter...still looking for a great deal on a external pond pump. I just want to make a system with as small a foot print as possible and still capable of good water quality. I will have approx. 10-15 koi and to start with, the largest koi's will be about 12-14" long.

  7. #7
    Sansai
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    Sep 2005
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    What size are the bottom drain and skimmer piping and what do they flow to?

  8. #8
    Honmei
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    Quote Originally Posted by jlbspd View Post
    I do not have a waterfall at this time... maybe in future. I have one bottom drain, one skimmer and a 3 way valve to control flow between the skimmer and bottom drain. I want to keep the pump somewhat close to the pond to prevent extra head pressure......I have at my desposal right now without making a trip to the local hardware store, 4 cubic feet of poly floating beads, (3) 55 gal drums and a box of bio ribbon, 40watt UV filter, a canister pool filter with 2" plumbing, have access to a pool bead filter...still looking for a great deal on a external pond pump. I just want to make a system with as small a foot print as possible and still capable of good water quality. I will have approx. 10-15 koi and to start with, the largest koi's will be about 12-14" long.
    Everything you list will not be adequate for the number of gallons you have in your pond.

  9. #9
    Sansai
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    Sep 2005
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    It sounds like you've already started improperly. A pond of that size needs to flow between 7000 and 10,000 gph. Your first job is to adequately remove that much water from the pond and prefilter it. You can do this in a diy fashion but you must understand it first. Your choices for water removal are bottom drains, skimmers and midwater drains. Your pond needs at least one 4 inch bottom drain or two 3 inch bottom drains leading to a settlement/seperation chamber or seive of some type which will give you between 3000 and 4000 gph. The rest should come from the skimmer and or midwater drain. These should be prefiltered also. I personally like to gravity flow all pond outlets to prefiltration before the pump/bio for less maintenance and better water quality. Once you've determined how your going to solve your outflow demand you can then decide on bio. First things first.
    Direct suction from the pond to pump is a very high maintenance and inadequate way to go. Protect your pump and bio from solids first then return it through your choices of bio conversion. Those choices are static bio for fines control, aerated static bio, aerated shower or aerated moving beds. These are all easily built in diy fashion also once you understand your demand. I also shy away from any type of pressurized filtration on a new pond because of the extra pressure and waste of electricity involved over time.

  10. #10
    Tosai paladin_k2's Avatar
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    If you are still working on fixing this installation, it sounds to me that the key missing element is to install a large enough settlement or vortex chamber to handle the flow rate you will pump through the filter system.

    Your current planned configuration has the Skimmer and bottom drains tied together. If you can instead rework things to gravity feed directly from the bottom drain to a properly sized settlement/vortex then you will be able to use a similar filtration system to the one we have installed on our 5500 gallon pond.

    In the diagram below foul "dirty" water from the bottom drain flow up through the 4" drain line and 4" isolation valve and into the green sedimentation/vortex chamber at a low point just above the bottom cone. In this case our space was severely limitted so we had to use a 170 gallon converted commercial dumpster shell that was virtually round at the bottom and transitioned to square with rounded corners at the top. The bottom was fitted internally with a coned bottom to a 2" drain that opened 4.5" feet deep into the ground into a sump where we could salvage the sludges and used it back into the gardens and flower beds.

    Water rises up in a swirling motion in the sediment chamber and passes through a solid fitted cap mat of black Matala before going into one of the two balanced 3" outflow pipes that lead into the pairs of barrel filters. You can see the 3" outlow pipes in the diagram as that penetrate out of the sediment chamber and down into the barrels. Flow into the first barrel filter in this case was by gravity into the bottom section and then across and down through the second barrel. The firts barrel in each pair is upflow while the second is downflow to the 2" suction inlets to the sequence pumps that get balanced by a two way T-valve. I used two parallel sets of barrels to get the flow rate down even lower over the bio media and also to make it possible to clean one side of the flow while leaving the biofiltration 100% intact on the other side. All of the water flow with the pumps turned onto high rate can be directed through one set of the barrels to real blast loose and accumulated film and crud.

    This install works great at a flow rate of about 5500 gallons per hour but if I had it to do over again and if I had lots of space I would have used a larger and more efficient sediment/vortex chamber. In this install, we still get some sludge accummulation in the bottom cones of the first pair of barrels and this has to be drawn off be just opening the drain valves and pulling off 5 gallons of water every two to three weeks. We draw off 5 to 15 gallons of sludge from the first sediment cone every 1 to 3 weeks depeneding how much food we are feeding to the fish or combined with the airborne leaf and debris load to the pond.

    If you size you first stage of sedimentation and vortex chamber to be large enough and fed properly by gravity then you could place the sequence pump after that stage and lift the water up into you DIY barrel filtration system which is locate behind some sort of visual screen. The advantage here would be that the barrels would be easier to clean and aerate and you could gravity flow back into your pond through a water fall system.

    Our system uses gravity flow for everything and then use the pump to feed water either into the landscape irrigation system or back through one of two different fully planted side ponds which contain no fish.

    Our fish load is a base of about 12 to 15 adult koi in the 20" to 30" size range and then up to about 20 yearlings which get selected from the the thousands of fry produced each year. I usually only keep one of two those yearlings each year to join the herd.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DIY filter systems?-barrel_filter.jpg  

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