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Thread: Pond Isolation and Parasite Prevention

  1. #1
    Jumbo Akai-San's Avatar
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    Question Pond Isolation and Parasite Prevention

    Sorry people, I just can't get enough. Even with an excellent biological water filtration system to achieve excellent water quality for koi to thrive in, what is the likelihood of "bad" parasites entering the pond to ruin your day(s). What are the most common areas that these parasites enter the pond environment? Are there any specific precautions taken for outdoor ponds? I am aware of isolation from animals, creatures, other fish (quarantine), etc. But, I'm thinking of other flying creatures like birds, dragonflies, crawling bugs that get passed the initial defenses placed for frogs, dogs, cats, people, etc. Anything else to watchout for? Thanks.

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    Parasites on vacation,...

    Hi Akai-San,

    The threat or concern for parasites entering your pond from outside sources and doing any damage is minimal! The primary "source" for parasites, bacteria, and viruses entering your filtered closed pond system is from bringing other fish and their bag water in.

    Any new Koi should be quarantined, and "debugged" before moving to join the established Koi collection.

    Best Wishes,
    Brady

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    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
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    There are some diseases that are carried by amphibians that may crawl or leap there way into to your pond. My most common one is flukes which are carried in to my outside ponds by birds. Once I have the koi inside no more fluke problems.
    Once outside with in 6 weeks you find them present and by fall I have to treat prior to bring them in again. Kinda like fleas to a dog!

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    Oyagoi bekko's Avatar
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    I have bufo, bullfrogs, red-ear turtle, aku, gallinules, african tree snails, apple snails, dragonflys, water boatmen, the occasional sally lightfoot crab, and probably other stuff that come and go at will from my freshwater ponds. I do not know if these transients have more parasites when they come, or when they go and suspect my fish carry around light infestations of lots of "bugs". I've never seen leaches on the fish, but found several on my legs the other day after wading through a small water lily mud pond. You may not be as fortunate.


    steve

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    Jumbo Akai-San's Avatar
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    From Birds?

    Quote Originally Posted by dick benbow
    There are some diseases that are carried by amphibians that may crawl or leap there way into to your pond. My most common one is flukes which are carried in to my outside ponds by birds. Once I have the koi inside no more fluke problems.
    Once outside with in 6 weeks you find them present and by fall I have to treat prior to bring them in again. Kinda like fleas to a dog!
    Are the diseases transferred from bird droppings or do the birds regularly wade or drink water from the pond. I ask because where I live in Kaneohe, I have a lot of birds that frequent our neighborhood (Many large neighborhood trees). With so much bird chatter going on, my mornings and afternoons are like being in a tropical forest, I guess better than highway sounds but still a concern I have.

    Anyone in Hawaii encounter problems with the white egrets. I haven't seen any herons yet except for Ala Moana Park eating all the talapia. Mynah birds, mountain doves, common doves, bobos, etc. Thanks all.

  6. #6
    Oyagoi bekko's Avatar
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    The white herons are cattle egrets. They are not especially attracted to water but will sometimes eat fish. If you have small fish, you need to be careful of the aku (black-crowned night heron) - a sly, greyish, no-neck villan with beady eyes. They eat fish almost exclusively. The doves love fish food and look for a spot where they can snacth it out of the water. All deposit their droppings.

    steve

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    Jumbo B.Scott's Avatar
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    I know lots of people starting out worry about parasites. It was my #1 worry when I started. Now I don't even think about them Most parasites are easy to identify and treat. By watching you fish you will quickly recognize when they have a problem. Then it's just a matter of identifying the culprit and treating the problem.

    Like Brady says most trouble starts with new fish. If you have a good quarantine system you can treat the new guys and the pond has no problems. To be honest I expect new fish to have a little something if only white-spot that sticks it's head up because of the stress of moving them around. In a small Q-system this is easy and inexpensive to treat.

    Where the Q-tank really comes into it's own is if you buy fish that turn out to have a major "nasty" hitching a ride. In this case you might not be able to do much or at best a good fish will be scared and ruined. The up side is this will be limited to the one or two fish in the Q-tank. The pond gets off with a bad case of the jitters.

    Learn to identify parasites. Visit www.koi-unleashed.co.uk and www.fishdoc.co.uk and watch the videos so you can learn what to look for. When you buy your scope (before the pond is built) try finding some infected fish and scraping them for parasites. Learn what to use to treat each type of parasite. I have some cards I made up with a list of parasites, the treatments available and the dosage for the pond, the dosage for the Q-tank and the general dosage in grams / m. It saves alot of math and the possibility of mistakes when you are uptight and worried about treating your fish.
    B.Scott

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    Jumbo Akai-San's Avatar
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    Q-Tank Specifics

    What is a good size for a Q-tank? 500-1000 gal.? What are the most common medication ratios. I figure, might as well size Q-tank to my advantage. What kind of materials are people using for building Q-tanks? Plastic Bins, Reinforce Plywood & Membrane Lined Boxes, nylon/pvc tension ponds? Also what is the average time spent in the Q-tanks? Especially when prepping NEW KOI.

    I have space to provide a separate filtration system (smaller) to sufficiently accommodate the Q-tank. Since my recent planning efforts has now incorporated one of these temporary/permanent Q-tanks, I'm thinking the Q-tank filtration can possibly serve as a redundant back-up system if ever something went wrong with the main system. I know it will be undersized, but at least I wouldn't be SOL. Thanks.

  9. #9
    Daihonmei dick benbow's Avatar
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    When It comes to QT tanks, here are some thoughts. Meter your water so that you know to the gallon what you have there for exact medicine dosage.

    Qt tanks should be run 24-7 with an established filter system. That means you need to keep 2 koi in thwere at all times to feed filters and visit with each other.
    A lone fish does not do well.

    consider 500-1000 gallons.If you intend to raise temps to push KHV symptoms you will need the ability to heat.


    to me koi health runs similar to humans. we are exposed to germs constantly and disease etc, But if we stay healthy, exercise our natural immune systems
    keep us going. the same with koi. Provide a healthy environment and they can fend off most problems. as already covered you can treat new fish prior to introducing them. The biggest problem most newbies have is to stock too many koi. resist the urge and have only a few. Less problems are created this way and as you get better educated you can better judge when and how to press the limits.

    good for you for asking questions AHEAD OF TIME!

  10. #10
    Jumbo B.Scott's Avatar
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    What Dick said! My complements for being so resorcefull BEFOREHAND.

    Remember that the cheapest way to build a pond is to get it right the first time!

    B.Scott

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