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  • quiz time on water quality

    here's the situation. You get a call from a koi kichi who has just run a series of tests on their pond water.They haven't really kept up with testing for awhile but now They are concerned with a nitrate reading of 40 ppm. They wait a week and run again. Same figures.

    the nitrite read is too small to be measurable.

    PH is 7.8

    gh 100

    kh 80

    the fish look good and don't show any problems. should they be concerned with a reading this high? in ther filtration process what causes this?
    Dick Benbow
  • #2

    I would take a stab and say that they do not do enough water changes or that their source water contains Nitrate to begin with.

    Also heard that an oversized filter can cause this.
    Jaco Vorster
    South Africa

    Comment

    • #3

      How about getting a different nitrate test kit and check it....
      Best regards,

      Bob Winkler

      My opinions are my best interpretation of my experiences. They are not set in stone as I intend to always be a student of life. And Koi.

      sigpic

      Comment

      • #4

        I think I'd just leave things alone and keep a keen eye on things for a while. As long as the fish are happy and healthy, I would'nt worry. Would I be Wrong?
        Koi-Unit
        " Da Best" Chapter
        xxx

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        • #5

          Assuming that ammonia is also zero or too small to be measurable, I agree w/ Akinosan.

          -Dan

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          • #6

            There is no Amonnia in any levels that can be recorded.
            Dick Benbow

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            • #7

              Well not previously knowing what Nitrate readings were going on before hand we would be able to tell. But since none are available.

              Any added supplements to give a false reading of Nitrates.

              Also when in doubt a good water change can help to be on the safe side of things.

              Jaco, when I was in the Reef tank hobby over bio filters gave hihg reading of nitrate as well..

              Joe
              It's a living creature (chit happens)

              Comment

              • #8

                so far I like the mentality to check the source water and the reliability of the test kit. Shows some good common sense here.

                in the conversion of amonnia released from the breathing and waste of the koi,
                it becomes nitrite first and then is converted to nitrate.

                this scenerio was an actual case. The person who was concerned assumed that 40 ppm was too much. It is still well within the safe zone.

                Jaco hit it on the money with water change as a solution. This can become a problem over time in a closed system as it will build up constantly. In this case the pond owner was doing water changes, he just needed to increase them in frequency or %. About 10-15% would be about right!

                so as a practical excercise to this, what are your nitrate levels?
                Dick Benbow

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                • #9

                  sorry Joe, I posted probably while you were. You and jaco hit it!
                  Dick Benbow

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                  • #10

                    In my old pond, nitrate was usually around 12-15ppm, but did get up to 20ppm at times. After hurricanes removed tree cover, algae growth became rapid. Nitrate stabilized under 10ppm. In new pond, nitrate is under 5ppm.

                    Comment

                    • #11

                      Originally posted by dick benbow
                      so far I like the mentality to check the source water and the reliability of the test kit. Shows some good common sense here.

                      in the conversion of amonnia released from the breathing and waste of the koi,
                      it becomes nitrite first and then is converted to nitrate.

                      this scenerio was an actual case. The person who was concerned assumed that 40 ppm was too much. It is still well within the safe zone.

                      Jaco hit it on the money with water change as a solution. This can become a problem over time in a closed system as it will build up constantly. In this case the pond owner was doing water changes, he just needed to increase them in frequency or %. About 10-15% would be about right!

                      so as a practical excercise to this, what are your nitrate levels?
                      Hi Dick, from what i understand nitrate is less harmful compare to nitrite or ammoni. So what is actually the adverse effect(s) of having too high of nitrate level then? I never tested the nitrate in my pond coz always think it is not a major concern.

                      Sorry if this is OOT, i always having problem with my kH constantly going down. Source water kH is 4dH and after one week kH always drop to 2dH. In order to back up the kH i used baking soda but after a while kH drops again. Is there any other way to maintain kH level besides adding baking soda cause if possible i would to avoid dumping chemical into pond.

                      Comment

                      • #12

                        Hi Paul,
                        Your right Nitrate is no big deal for fish health, even in the hundreds. Some maintain that it contributes to a balnket weed problem. But if you can keep it in the numbers of Mike's new pond, then your doing well.

                        baking soda has the ability to get you back where you want to be ( and then right back down almost as fast) this yo-yo effect on the koi is not good and should be avoided. Whenever you add something you have to monitor which is a pain as you've learned with baking soda. First option i recommend is putting a constant trickle of fresh water in so that it maintains the source water amount.

                        Depending on what your goal is with your koi ( growth or finishing ) you may consider using crushed oyster shell as a buffer.

                        Let us know how either of these two options work for you.
                        Dick Benbow

                        Comment

                        • #13

                          Well, for option 1 constant trickle is not feasible as i have to treat my tap water which contains chlorine before use it for the pond. Alternatively i can do water changeout (5%) every other day cause it takes one night to deal wt chlorine. As of now i am doing 10% every week only and i think i will change this habit.

                          For option 2, crushed oyster shell, i kindl of have done that but using lithaqua. Most likely i will add corals (which is easier to find here) cause right now i dont think lithaqua makes that huge differences unless i put a ton of them in the pump chamber? Now, with your clue, oyster shell has calcium content in it which in turn makes the water hard so it is suitable for finishing rather than growing ? This just a guess from me hehehe ..

                          Comment

                          • #14

                            Originally posted by paulino88
                            Well, for option 1 constant trickle is not feasible as i have to treat my tap water which contains chlorine before use it for the pond. Alternatively i can do water changeout (5%) every other day cause it takes one night to deal wt chlorine. As of now i am doing 10% every week only and i think i will change this habit.

                            For option 2, crushed oyster shell, i kindl of have done that but using lithaqua. Most likely i will add corals (which is easier to find here) cause right now i dont think lithaqua makes that huge differences unless i put a ton of them in the pump chamber? Now, with your clue, oyster shell has calcium content in it which in turn makes the water hard so it is suitable for finishing rather than growing ? This just a guess from me hehehe ..
                            you've got it right! water with minimal hardness is better for growing and harder water for finishing.
                            Dick Benbow

                            Comment

                            • #15

                              Originally posted by dick benbow
                              sorry Joe, I posted probably while you were. You and jaco hit it!
                              Thanks Dick,, I got lucky But when in doubt a water change is always a good idea...

                              Joe
                              It's a living creature (chit happens)

                              Comment

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