Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

R Show KOI like Athletes???? or ????

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • R Show KOI like Athletes???? or ????

    Ok I went for a run this Morning


    So for koi the condition is up we keep em clean healthy and in close to top shape. Then we target a show we want to enter and we plan out how we are gonna maximize the koi looks etc...

    Same thing?

    Thoughts???

    Again Sharing my thoughts from my Morning...


    Joe
    It's a living creature (chit happens)
  • #2

    Originally posted by keokoi
    Ok I went for a run this Morning


    So for koi the condition is up we keep em clean healthy and in close to top shape. Then we target a show we want to enter and we plan out how we are gonna maximize the koi looks etc...

    Same thing?

    Thoughts???

    Again Sharing my thoughts from my Morning...


    Joe

    Usually want to pick the show when it is goin to nice chilly(not freezing), preferably a show out doors. Reason for a nice chilly show is the water is cooler and the fish will show better. Colors will be up and the overall apperance looks good.

    It's all about conditioning the fish and I would have to say it is more like a beauty contest than a track meet...
    The world sleeps as the chance to learn something new passes.

    Comment

    • #3

      HAHAH was trying to stay aay from the beauty contest thing but what I was getting at was there is a time period in which you have to work on the koi to bring out the most in it.. Whatever brew we use to pump up the koi last few weeks.

      Or do all people jsut net em out of pond and toss em in a show tank???

      Joe
      It's a living creature (chit happens)

      Comment

      • #4

        Originally posted by keokoi
        HAHAH was trying to stay aay from the beauty contest thing but what I was getting at was there is a time period in which you have to work on the koi to bring out the most in it.. Whatever brew we use to pump up the koi last few weeks.

        Or do all people jsut net em out of pond and toss em in a show tank???

        Joe
        Yep, we just net a bunch and throw then in our transport tank and away we go... LOL
        We always change there diet weeks before a show increase water changes and a few other tricks..

        Comment

        • #5

          I think your thoughts are valid. Athletes go on a training schedule that will have them peaking about the time of the event. The same is true with koi. My experience with most smaller shows is that the average keeper has no idea on how to accomplish this. Long range or short range. Because of convenience many shows are held during growth times for koi and make things more difficult for those who wish to show their koi than say the early spring or winter like in Japan.

          After benching a small show this past weekend I saw many koi that were out of shape and undersized for their lengthclass because the owner had no clue about conditioning and putting a koi in a size class that it could excell in.

          I would like to see some serious input on this topic and glad to see it brought forward. It's worthy for old timers to be reminded of things and for new folks to have the exposure and knowledge.
          Dick Benbow

          Comment

          • #6

            Ray Jordan had this to say about koi show "strategy" on another board:

            Another thread I read there were some posts about how often to show the same koi. Should you go to back to back shows with the same koi?

            It is very important to not show your koi too often. There is some stress and sometimes a few bumps and dings are not uncommon when catching and transporting koi to a show. Also know that you should quarantine your koi for at least 4 weeks at 72-76 degree anytime they are moved so you can observe them and be sure they are in perfect shape before they go back into your pond.

            I have learned the hard way and also seen too many high potential young koi taken to too frequently to shows and then because of a combination of stress and or minor dings end up with an infection and a scar or loss of color or just plain deteriorate.

            So what is too often? I can't give you a one size fits all answer. If things go perfectly at one show and your koi come through without a hitch then maybe 2-3 months between shows would be adequate. If only a few minor issues that quickly resolve then I would wait a minimum of 4-6 months after things are back to normal. Personally I only show the same koi once a year. I have koi that I have owned for four year before going to a show. I can tell you that the best koi in Japan are not shown until they reach their peak even if it takes them 12 years.

            Here is a suggestion. Say you want to go to two shows that are fairly close together. One is your nearby home show and another is several hours drive away. You have about six koi you want to show. There could be several strategies used. Take the smallest koi to the show farther away. Smaller koi handle the stress of transportation better and the larger koi to the nearby show.

            Say you have several koi a similar size that would compete in the same size. Instead of having your own koi go head to head spilt them so that they go to different shows. Or say one is a inside show with poor lighting for reds. Take your shiro Utsuris and showas to the poorly lighted inside show and your Kohakus, metallics and Gin Rins to the outside show.

            Or one show has sizes where your koi would be at the bottom of the size and another where they would be at the top of the size. Size matters take the koi that would be at the top of that size to that show. Or a show where there is a head judge that loves shiro utsuris take your shiros to that show.

            Pay attention to the awards to be given. If there is not a tategoi award do not take high potential unfinished koi. If there is a most unusual award be sure to take your tancho beni Kumanryu or your Showa goromo there. If there is a male champion award and you have a knockout male koi - go for it.

            Taking fewer koi is less stressful for your koi in a less crowded tank and for you. THen you will be able to take other koi to support and compete in another show. Plan whick koi go when to a show. It adds to the excitment and also the fun of preshow planning. In other words have a game plan."


            I was really interested in this information, as I know of a number of hobbyists who take their same fish to three shows within a couple of months in the summer. Naturally by the 3rd show, they are really "down."
            ChrisC

            Comment

            • #7

              lots of good input Chris on the stress and strategy of showing. Anyone got some input on preparation?
              Dick Benbow

              Comment

              • #8

                First thing I do is ask my fish.."Are you ready?" if they say no then no show...HAHAHA...With my Kohaku that went to ZNA I didn't show him for more than 2 years...I think the show represent more of koi husbandary than the fish itself. To see a fish do well from year to year like Nancy's fish have is a true example of koi husbandary.

                With me in the off season I try to maintain the girth and Shiroji quality in the summer. Koi will grow and want to grow so in the summer months find a feeding regiment and stick to it.

                During the show season, I stick with wheatgrem as the staple and a couple of months before the show to bring yup the beni. Starving the fish 1 to 2 weeks before the show wont kill them, but bring out the true quality of the fish once it hit the cold show tank....
                The world sleeps as the chance to learn something new passes.

                Comment

                • #9

                  How much time is required to prepare koi for showing?

                  Comment

                  • #10

                    seems to me the comparison should be to Bodybuilding Contests...size, mass, shape

                    Comment

                    • #11

                      Ok here are a few basic things I do. I am sure in different area it would vary.

                      Two Parts to preparing koi for a show:

                      First is the long term preperation and actually the goal when the koi was purchased is a big part of this. I buy some koi to show within a year or two and some to show in 3-5 years. Since some koi finish at a smaller size and younger age they are bought as one year olds with the goal in mind of winning say baby Champion. Others bought as two or three year olds are bought with goal of winning a larger major award knowing it will be 3-5 years down the road. Once placed in my pond goal becomes to provide best water and growing conditions for the koi. My pond is small only 9,000 gallons but I have a filter system designed for 30,000 gallons. I do frequent water changes and filter backwashes and feed only wheatgerm food with some occasional fresh food treats. I want to avoid any pond treatments if possible. Use quarantine to keep nasties out of pond.

                      2nd Preperation for a show. I decide which koi are likely to go to a show about two months ahead of time. I carefully catch and measure them to see how they will fit in the size groups for a show. For example if want to win baby champion from size 1 & 2 and size two is up to 12 inches. I want to take a koi very close but slightly under 12 inches. I start cutting back on food and do not feed koi at all for 7-10 days before a show. I increase water changes( to 20-25%) a week and more frequent filter backwashes( daily if possible) about a month before a show. Avoid adding salt to the pond as it increases slime and reduces sheen. I carefully bag and transport koi to the show in large coolers with small cold packs to keep them calm and happy. I bring the koi to the show as early as possible to let them adjust to the different water conditions.
                      Disclosure:These opinions are based on my experience and conversations with persons I consider accomplished koi keepers and do not reflect the viewpoint of any organization.

                      Comment

                      • #12

                        tHANK-YOU RAY FOR YOUR INPUT. cOUPLA GOOD ONES IN THERE!
                        Dick Benbow

                        Comment

                        All content and images copyright of: Koi-bito.com
                        Working...
                        X