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Jap Mat Bio Filter Users- Are You Using it as A Fines Filter Also?

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  • Jap Mat Bio Filter Users- Are You Using it as A Fines Filter Also?

    I made a slight mod to my two jap mat filter chambers, and now my pond is never any clearer.

    Homer told me when he inspected my pond that the surface level of water should be equal or lower than the upper edge of the jap mats in order to keep the water from skipping the biofilter and to ensure bio filtration of all the water going thru it. Mine had the water surface at a higher level. His suggestion made sense and I thought of buying more matting. But the cheap side of me got the better of me, and I ended up using a tweak to ensure water doesn't skip the mattings. I used pvc sheets to block the passage of water above the mattings.

    Also, since there is a channel below the mattings that allow water to flow through without going thru the mattings, I placed a piece of 2 inch pvc pipe cross-wise at the exit end of the matting to block the thru-flow.

    This way, the water had to go thru the mattings to ensure bio filtration. An unintended consequence I hadn't expected was the mattings ended up filtering the fines.

    Pond looks nice, but as expected, I needed to clean my bio filter chambers more often now. Just goes to show how nice but deceiving a clear pond can be. It could be clear but it could harbor plenty pathogenic bacteria if the fines end up plugging up the mattings. Moreover, the biofilter efficiency and effectiveness could easily be compromised.

    Still, it is to me a good thing. A system like mine allows a lot of fines to go past my brush filter. The biofilter keeps the fines from going back to the pond. I just have to make sure I clean my filter more often.

    But I'm not saying this is the be all and end all. It serves me well until I improve my filter setup as far as solid wastes and fines are concerned.
  • #2

    See post #5.

    http://www.koi-bito.com/forum/main-f...ould-work.html


    mechanical filters are the first stage. If they are working properly, only a very small amount of detritus gets to the following bio stages. No mechanical stage succeeds like a barrier. You just want one that is easy to clean.
    Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

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    • #3

      Originally posted by MCA View Post
      See post #5.

      http://www.koi-bito.com/forum/main-f...ould-work.html


      mechanical filters are the first stage. If they are working properly, only a very small amount of detritus gets to the following bio stages. No mechanical stage succeeds like a barrier. You just want one that is easy to clean.
      Hi Mike, could you please elaborate on what you mean by barrier? Thanks!

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      • #4

        Hi Mike,

        Did I mentioned that the mats needs plenty of aeration as well and to flush the bottom of jap mats chamber once at least a month.

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        • #5

          Originally posted by sacicu View Post
          Hi Mike,

          Didn't I mentioned also that the mats needs plenty of aeration as well and to flush the bottom of jap mats chamber once at least a month.
          Yes you did. They're doing a great job. When I slack off my tancho would remind me without fail ⊙_⊙

          Comment

          • #6

            Originally posted by yerrag View Post
            Hi Mike, could you please elaborate on what you mean by barrier? Thanks!
            Seive, RDF, matting, static k1 bed, foam sheet. The key is one that is effective and still easy to clean. In a vortex, consider adding a 12 inch layer of k1 or other floating media.
            Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

            Comment

            • #7

              Originally posted by MCA View Post
              Seive, RDF, matting, static k1 bed, foam sheet. The key is one that is effective and still easy to clean. In a vortex, consider adding a 12 inch layer of k1 or other floating media.
              What I'm not seeing is your mention of brush filter. I'm finding large particles going thru my brush filters, maybe they're finding a way thru the filter bottom, as I've made sure the brushes are packed from side to side. Or maybe, brush filters need some help by way of your aforementioned barriers. What's your take Mike?

              Also, do you suggest putting the k1 at the top chamber or bottom chamber of my vortex sump?

              Comment

              • #8

                I made 2 sieves (1 before and 1 after the brushes) to filter out fines. These are rinsed daily.

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                • #9

                  Originally posted by nivek View Post
                  I made 2 sieves (1 before and 1 after the brushes) to filter out fines. These are rinsed daily.
                  Pray tell. What kind of sieves? Wedge wires? What micron size?

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                  • #10

                    Originally posted by yerrag View Post
                    Pray tell. What kind of sieves? Wedge wires? What micron size?
                    Plastic netting that you can get from your local hardware shop. Not sure about the micron size though.

                    Click image for larger version

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                    • #11

                      Originally posted by nivek View Post
                      Plastic netting that you can get from your local hardware shop. Not sure about the micron size though.

                      [ATTACH=CONFIG]39483[/ATTACH]
                      Haha. With that before and after the brush, do you still need the brushes?

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                      • #12

                        Originally posted by yerrag View Post
                        Haha. With that before and after the brush, do you still need the brushes?
                        Haha yea call me OCD but I still have 2 rows of brushes LOL

                        Comment

                        • #13

                          Originally posted by yerrag View Post
                          Pray tell. What kind of sieves? Wedge wires? What micron size?
                          Commercial sieve examples are Cetus, Zakki Sieve, and Ultra Sieve 3. There have been many references to them in threads on this forum. They use wedge wire and have 200-300 micron screens. But I guess you know all this.

                          Koi Pond Filters | Buy The Cetus Sieve | Evolution Aqua Ltd
                          SIBO | Professional Water Products
                          http://www.deepwaterkoi.com/Zakki-Si...-Filter-Zakki-
                          Sieve Filter Systems - Pond Filtration
                          pond sieve | eBay


                          The mechanical stage(s) exists to gentle capture an remove waste like koi poo, leaves and such out of the water column as fast as possible. It is the first filtering step after the dirt is removed from the pond through the bottom drain or skimmer. The mechanical stage also ensures that the biological filter is not clogged with large debris which would have a negative influence on the operation of the biological filter.
                          A popular mechanical stage is a sieve, but drum filters are used more and more.

                          Previously the mechanical stage was implemented using chambers with brushes or large vortices. Brushes work on coarse particles but bring annoyance when cleaning,. The vortex only works well with particles that have negative buoyancy A modern replacement of the brush chamber is in a layer of 20-30 cm thick bed static medium like K1. Let this sit without air floating on the water and it will perform coarse particle capture. For cleaning, the air can be connected to boil the bed, after which the dirty water can be discharged to the sewer.

                          Modern filter lines usually have a curved screen sieve or wedge wire or a mesh drum as the mechanical stage. . In general a screen has the advantage that dirt is collected dry and removed constantly (out of the water) so less ammonia remains in the system and ultimately less nitrate will. The disadvantage of the use of a sieve is that it will be directly connected to the bottom drain (gravity-system), but the rest of the filter line is then pump-fed. The rest of the filter line is thus higher than the pond in order to ensure a good flow. A sieve can filter particles of 200μm out and a drum filter can typically capture in the 50µm range. Drum filters are expensive but they can get the smallest dirt from water and are available fully automated. The dirt that is caught can be automatically discharged.
                          Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

                          Comment

                          • #14

                            Thanks for the concise roundup on sieves Mike. It sure takes an investment to get one system set up primarily on account of the RDF. But that won't be outrageously UN affordable to koi keepers with very expensive koi in their ponds. For those with existing ponds, it's not a small matter of having to disrupt their koi's lives to rebuild. That is, if they're willing to spare the expense and effort. Of course, your setup with a sieve and a bead filter gets the job done as well with less of a disruption.

                            I'll be content for now working within the limits of a traditional brush and mat system, with the mat filtering fines that get thru the brush. I may try blocking the entry of fines to the mats using a mosquito net shown below covering the transfer pipes, something similar to Nivek 's setup. Some more daily work required though. At some point I may just ditch the brush and go with a static k1 media. And that'll be less work. And of course, if I can make time, I'll need to build and try out the airlift driven active vortex sump with the convenient airlift driven solid waste removal system on another thread.Click image for larger version

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