Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Thinking about spawning this season

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts
  • #16

    LOL....

    But, I'm not sure if your concern is with fry being raised (i.e., the potential need for the 35-foot liner pond we were talking about originally), or the young ones you think you will be keeping???

    A fellow in the Orlando club raises a ton of non-descript koi each year and sells them for as little as $1 apiece. He has fun doing it and readily trumpets that he has junk koi at cheap prices for the person who is happy with just that. If your intent is to produce something better than junk, then you must be prepared to kill the bulk of what you produce when they reach a size sufficient to decide whether they past muster. For the first-time backyard breeder, this is emotionally traumatic. You begin to become attached to the little things you've worked so hard to raise.... all that bother in producing greenwater, setting up systems, giving up personal time to perform all the work involved.... all just to kill nearly all of them. But, that is what you've got to do in order to devote available resources to the few potentially worthy ones. If you are not prepared to be a mass murderer of koi fingerlings, then koi breeding will not be any fun at all. There are plenty enough crapagoi in the world. You do not need to do all that work and incur all the expense just to add more to the unwanted masses. And, you will not be happy if you assume a responsibility for keeping them alive for their natural life span.

    Comment

    • #17

      Originally posted by MikeM View Post
      LOL....

      But, I'm not sure if your concern is with fry being raised (i.e., the potential need for the 35-foot liner pond we were talking about originally), or the young ones you think you will be keeping???

      A fellow in the Orlando club raises a ton of non-descript koi each year and sells them for as little as $1 apiece. He has fun doing it and readily trumpets that he has junk koi at cheap prices for the person who is happy with just that. If your intent is to produce something better than junk, then you must be prepared to kill the bulk of what you produce when they reach a size sufficient to decide whether they past muster. For the first-time backyard breeder, this is emotionally traumatic. You begin to become attached to the little things you've worked so hard to raise.... all that bother in producing greenwater, setting up systems, giving up personal time to perform all the work involved.... all just to kill nearly all of them. But, that is what you've got to do in order to devote available resources to the few potentially worthy ones. If you are not prepared to be a mass murderer of koi fingerlings, then koi breeding will not be any fun at all. There are plenty enough crapagoi in the world. You do not need to do all that work and incur all the expense just to add more to the unwanted masses. And, you will not be happy if you assume a responsibility for keeping them alive for their natural life span.
      I'm am surely not afraid to toss thousands of baby koi into the ground for fertilizer or feed larger carnivorous fish some baby koi-bites. I definitely wont have any time/patience to sell any koi. I really will be more interested in learning to cull (really hard) to get rid of the rubbish. I hear that A LOT of fry are deformed in one way or another. Just seeing and tossing these fry will be a huge learning experience for me. I'd really like to experience the hardship in trying to find 1 or 2 fry that I would want to keep. I hear even that is not easy. Ordering my liner now...

      Comment

      • #18

        Looking forward to updates as you pursue the experience! You've got the spirit.

        Comment

        • #19

          Okay, sitting around my parents dining table yesterday talking about my plans to do my first koi spawning and all the things that I've been prepping to get ready for the new fry, AND BOOM! A BOMB went off in my head. My parents have a HUGE pool in the backyard that has been empty for years. (my dad had ideas to make his 20K gallon koi pond). The sides are covered with green algae and I don't know what else has fallen into it. The pool has not been filled to the top in over 20 years, so the plaster finish is no longer good, but it still retains water with no leaking. Is this perfect or what? Rainwater and leaves from trees is what I see that gets caught in the pool. They recently drained the pool water and placed one chlorine tablet in the small puddle of water that is left over. Soooooo, I am thinking of utlizing this GIANT pool for a fry grow-out. What do I need to do to nutrilize the chlorine in the water. I took out the tablet, but I'm sure may have more traces in and around the pool. I just stocked up on a couple gallons of PRIME, so will treat and test the water quality with new water and see what I am left with. I am thinking to run a simple trickle tower system directly in the pond in attempt to get the water primed/prepped. I'm sure the green water and algae will grow just fine if I keep the water exposed to the summer sunlight.

          I'm not planning on using the entire water volume as there is a deep end (8ft) and shallow end (4 ft). It is a L-Shaped pool so looking to use 24 inches of water on the deep end for the fry grow-out (12ft long x 8ft wide). The pool is out in the open south-west side of the property, so I expect the water to be in direct sunlight and water temps to be quite warm (80+ degrees). Is this okay for the fry? Once I place the fry in the pool and take out the trickle tower, I can provide shade cover over the pool top and still be able to walk in the pool to access water.

          Of course, I'll have to transport the fry from my house to parents house five minutes away. Starting to feel my back pains just thinking about the transport of thousands of fry and water.

          Any thoughts or advice?

          Comment

          • #20

            One of the Orlando club's members uses his swimming pool in just this way. While the fish are small, no filtration is needed. So, no little ones killed in a filter. Aeration can be added when the fry begin to look like fish. With enough fish, there are no significant mosquito problems. But, you will need to have filtration eventually unless your culling keeps the population down. ....It will look a mess. Are your parents really willing to put up with it? ....Of course, they will be seeing a lot of you. Most parents will put up with a lot to have their grown children visiting daily.

            Comment

            • #21

              I covered my green water to stop draggon flies laying their eggs but large enough for mosqitos to go in great food for fry
              Regards
              Eugene

              Comment

              • #22

                Originally posted by MikeM View Post
                One of the Orlando club's members uses his swimming pool in just this way. While the fish are small, no filtration is needed. So, no little ones killed in a filter. Aeration can be added when the fry begin to look like fish. With enough fish, there are no significant mosquito problems. But, you will need to have filtration eventually unless your culling keeps the population down. ....It will look a mess. Are your parents really willing to put up with it? ....Of course, they will be seeing a lot of you. Most parents will put up with a lot to have their grown children visiting daily.
                I regularly see my mom 3 times a week now since pops left us last year. I figure that I'm just picking up where he left off, he can watch his crazy koikichi son from above She was all for it as dad loved keeping his koi. I found his design plans to build his koi pond out of the swimming pool and thought that this is very doable. His design introduces new pond floor drains on the existing pool bottom; just build up and pour a new concrete floor. This could get dangerous. Haha. I guess I have more research to do. The scary part is that I already have the pumps, filters and piping to setup and run a 10,000 gallon pond. Oh Oh......

                Comment

                • #23

                  Originally posted by Eugeneg View Post
                  I covered my green water to stop draggon flies laying their eggs but large enough for mosqitos to go in great food for fry
                  Regards
                  Eugene
                  How fine a net is needed to stop the dragon flies? Height from surface of the water?

                  Comment

                  • #24

                    Sorry to hear about your loss, Akai-san. It's good that you are keeping your dad's memory alive with koi. Did you ever get the spawning net? One of my clients, who is a seamstress, sewed me one using sheer fabric. I am hoping to test it out with a sanke spawn soon. Can't allow you have all the fun. :-)

                    As far as dragonflies go, it takes 2-5 weeks for their eggs to develop into nymphs. If you time your spawning right, they would not be a problem. The fry will quickly outgrow the nymphs to prey on them.

                    Comment

                    • #25

                      Originally posted by Akai-San View Post
                      I found his design plans to build his koi pond out of the swimming pool and thought that this is very doable. His design introduces new pond floor drains on the existing pool bottom; just build up and pour a new concrete floor. ......
                      My experience: In 2008 (WOW, has it been that long now?) my koi pond-pool’s one original main pool drain finally blocked up for good and would not yield to multiple attempts at making it work, up to and including using a scuba diver. Quite a few members of my wonderful koi club helped me catch and move all the fish to another members’, the Hardcastles, extra holding tanks, about 40 miles from my home. The 30,000+ gallons of water were drained. I had contracted with a pool-building company to re-do the piping, converting from 1 ½ inch to a 4-inch drain and pipe. First, they water-blasted a wide area around the bottom drain, to remove the VERY healthy carpet algae. (This turned out to be a LOT more difficult than the company had imagined it to be!) Then, it was "build up and pour a new concrete floor." They set the 4-inch koi pond bottom drain, (which I had previously ordered from a koi supply company in Wisconsin), with a length of 4-inch pipe running across the bottom and up the side of the pool, to a hole through the concrete, just under to pool deck. The pool company worker had stood at the bottom of the pool’s deep end and used a big impact drill, held as high as he could reach over his head, to make the 4-inch hole. They poured the concrete on the bottom and heaped concrete over the pipe up the side wall of the pool. Meanwhile, I began to think that another drain, at about mid-level on the side of the pool might be nice. We negotiated a change-order and I rush-ordered another 4 inch koi pond bottom drain, which was installed through a second hole in the wall of the pool. Both of these new pipes were run under the pool deck and over to the pond pump and filters, where they met up with the original two pipes from the pool skimmer and the original three pipes going back to the pool returns. The extra volume of water to the main koi pond filters allowed by the 4 inch pipe, and especially that extra drain, REALLY does make a difference!

                      Comment

                      • #26

                        Originally posted by Tosai_Sunny View Post
                        Sorry to hear about your loss, Akai-san. It's good that you are keeping your dad's memory alive with koi. Did you ever get the spawning net? One of my clients, who is a seamstress, sewed me one using sheer fabric. I am hoping to test it out with a sanke spawn soon. Can't allow you have all the fun. :-)

                        As far as dragonflies go, it takes 2-5 weeks for their eggs to develop into nymphs. If you time your spawning right, they would not be a problem. The fry will quickly outgrow the nymphs to prey on them.
                        I just received a couple mosquito nets that I ordered online. They are rectangular in shape/volume 5ft x 6ft and 5ft tall. Looks like good 180 fine mesh polyester material, but I think the holes are too big to retain any eggs or fry. The mesh holes are close to 1/32 of an inch. I'll have to check how big koi eggs are.

                        Update: Looks great, but NO can do . mesh is definitely too big. Oh well...back to the drawing board. I really don't want to scoop out all the fry out of the round/blue show tank. It must be a mess after...

                        Comment

                        • #27

                          So, I came home late last night from a four day trip and found that my pumps had stopped (I don't know for how long!). Two of my koi were starting to gasp at the surface for air when I turned on my lanai lights. OH SH!+ !!! I went into emergency mode...Noticed that the breaker tripped (This has never happened on this small load). I reset everything and the pumps went on. I need to find out what happened.

                          Water was not crystal clear as it usually is, so I'm guessing the pumps were off for 10-12 hours. Autofeeder for feeding. Still a small amount of food floating on surface so I know it was awhile. Super bubbles and immediate water changes went into effect. I was a little upset that my family payed no attention after I asked them to just check-in on them once a day to make sure at least water falls were flowing (systems on).

                          Everyones okay this morning, and I'm glad I had no casualties. They must surely be stressed out!

                          Comment

                          • #28

                            Perhaps a power surge tripped it? ...In any event, glad it turned out alright.

                            Comment

                            • #29

                              Back in business. Koi are all good and eager again, but summer is flying by and I cant find the time to get started on this project. Dont want to do this [email protected]$$ and not sure how long I have here in Hawaii, before spawning season is over. Waiting for my fry grow-out pond to get established and I still haven't set up the spawning tanks yet. Not sure if I'll make it happen this year. Too many other things going on taking priority.

                              Comment

                              • #30

                                Sooooo, its that time of year again and not sure whether to go through the spawning experience for the first time again. I have noticed that the gals are getting more round and plump. I'm really scared to start down this road as there is no turning back once I put the pair(s) together. I know, I know! Each year I think about this commitment and each year I "chicken-out". At least for me...each year, I get one step closer and are more prepared than the year before. I just feel that I would be way over my head with this undertaking.

                                I already have a few 200 gallon green water tanks ready to go and have started my systems prep work for a make-shift grow-out fry pond (making green water in parents drained pool). How deep should this fry pond be? I'd like to keep it 18" at its deepest if that is okay for fry. Should I use a pond liner? Would the existing weathered plaster surface present a bad condition for the fry? Plaster = High pH? I will need to test this water once I get it set-up.

                                What do you use for dragon fly deterant? I remember seeing the critters in the pool last year when I left the water unsupervised for a couple months. Not sure how to place a net over the pond as I will most likely be running a shower set-up in the center of the pool that will run during sun light hours. I'm thinking that I really want to get some kind of filtration and don't want the fry in totally stagnant water in the pool. Any words about my crazy thoughts?

                                Comment

                                All content and images copyright of: Koi-bito.com
                                Working...
                                X