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  • KHV Alert

    The following was posted on another koi board recently:


    We haven't heard much about KHV (Koi Herpes Virus) lately thank goodness, but it's still around and you can't be too careful. We just received this warning from the Show Chairman of the recent San Diego Koi Show:

    To All,
    It is my sad duty and responsibility as the Show Chairman for the 28th Annual Koi show conducted at the Del Mar Fairgrounds on March 7th and 8th of 2015 to inform you that a licensed California Veterinarian has reported a case of koi KHV, after receiving a positive PCR test from UC Davis lab. Information collected by the veterinarian from the affected pond owner has led to the conclusion that the purchase of koi from just one vendor at the San Diego show is the source of the KHV infection.

    Additional information is being collected and the vendor has agreed to be as helpful as possible. Based on the information contained in an email from the veterinarian and talking with the vendor in question, I believe it prudent and appropriate at this time to get this information out as soon as possible so you can decide on any action you may need or want to take at this time.

    KHV ALERT

    If you purchased koi from Tommy Hui at Gold Fish Net from Texas ([email protected]) at the KCSD Koi Show in March of 2015 you may have purchased koi infected with KHV. The vendor was located just to the right of the concession stand and also sold goldfish.

    To quote the veterinarian: “Anyone who bought fish from this vendor needs to test their pond (koi) as soon as its temp is over 70F. It may be wise for those people to raise the entire pond, or at least their most precious koi in a quarantine tank, to 85F for the next 6 weeks to prevent or limit outbreaks.”

    You should contact your veterinarian to discuss testing your koi. If you do not have a Koi vet please contact me ([email protected]) and I can help you find one in your area.

    r/koi jack Chairman KCSD 2015 Koi Show

    Hopefully this doesn't affect anyone on this mailing list, but wanted to let you know and remind you to always be careful when introducing new koi into your pond.

    Happy Koi Keeping,

    Don Chamberlain
    SCVKWG Secretary and AKCA Representative
  • #2

    Since high-end goldfish carried by Tommy Hui are most often from China, I would guess the koi he sold at the San Diego show were also from China. I am hoping this is the case and that this incident does not mark a break-down in the bio-security regime that has been rather effective in making KHV a non-issue with Japanese imports in recent years. I'm hoping for further updates.

    This brings to mind that goldfish can be carriers of KHV, showing no symptoms, but capable of infecting koi kept in the same pond (or through contaminated water transfer). As much as we may like to believe that KHV can be eliminated from commerce in koi, there is less impetus for the goldfish industry to be as focused. So, the mixing of goldfish and koi carries a risk that is not easily addressed.

    Comment

    • #3

      My hat of to the San Diego Koi Club leadership for making this information to the public.

      I would love to learn the process of how they ended up to identify a dealer, who brought Goldfish/Koi to the show?

      Comment

      • #4

        Likely the simple process of deduction after talking to folks who purchased fish at the show, from which vendors, and checking if the purchased koi appear to be showing signs of KHV. If someone who has had their fish for years at home with no indication of KHV and a new fish(es) are introduced from only one vendor and any of the koi evidence KHV......the probability is very high that the new fish carried the pathogen.
        Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

        Comment

        • #5

          In a Sue happy world these days ( you heard about the suit over the latest boxing fight in nevada? ) it does put individual as well as clubs they represent in jepardy.

          Still for the benefit of the hobby, alerts such as these need to take place with clarity. I think Mike Snaden of Yume Koi in the UK exemplifies what honesty can do. Faced with accusations spreading KHV unknown to him initially, he owned up to the fact when confirmed immediately, made restitution to all at a great financial sacrifice to his household (he would never have introduced the fish had he known) but he survived
          and now prospers because of his integrity and leading the way in understanding a new health challenge. It's the kind of moral leadership one needs in this hobby.

          And it is hats OFF to the club for helping others to be aware. So that they can take precautions. A certain radio network news reporter used to always tell the "rest of the news" and they would be especially important here. My hunch is that proper protocall of QT was not followed and resulted in the outbreak.

          So what should we learn from this? put our head in the sand and live in fear of any new purchase? HECK NO!!! continue to buy fish, support the breeders and dealers and the hobby and the joy new prospects bring BUT for goodness sake have a great QT facility and don't be negligent
          or ignorant in usung it properly.
          Dick Benbow

          Comment

          • #6

            And NEVER EVER take delivery of koi from more than one dealer at the same time!!! If you do and there is a pathogen problem, You have no way to know with high probability the source of the problem. And you can not provide useful and needed feedback to the dealer or others who have purchased from them.
            Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

            Comment

            • #7

              Originally posted by MCA View Post
              And NEVER EVER take delivery of koi from more than one dealer at the same time!!! If you do and there is a pathogen problem, You have no way to know with high probability the source of the problem. And you can not provide useful and needed feedback to the dealer or others who have purchased from them.
              The problem with your solution is that dealers get their fish from diffrent sources. The safest way is to buy direct from breeder. A little hassel if importing outside country but a far better price.
              Regards
              Eugene

              Comment

              • #8

                As a retail customer, I only get my koi from one dealer. I am usually there when he gets in 50-75 boxes from Niigata that indeed have koi from multiple breeders. But he does QT on all the fish. They are scraped and scoped, treated for pathogens, and heat cycled for KHV check. Usually koi are not available for delivery for 6-8 weeks after arrival. From a pathogen detection and prevention perspective, the buck stops at the single dealer I do business with. I do not need to know or care about the farm where the koi were born.....as long as it is Niigata.
                Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

                Comment

                • #9

                  "The safest way is to buy direct from breeder'.

                  How many koi hobbyists can afford that or able to connect to breeders in Japan directly? was there a few breeders in Japan also got KHV?

                  Comment

                  • #10

                    Originally posted by dick benbow View Post
                    In a Sue happy world these days ( you heard about the suit over the latest boxing fight in nevada? ) it does put individual as well as clubs they represent in jepardy.

                    Still for the benefit of the hobby, alerts such as these need to take place with clarity. I think Mike Snaden of Yume Koi in the UK exemplifies what honesty can do. Faced with accusations spreading KHV unknown to him initially, he owned up to the fact when confirmed immediately, made restitution to all at a great financial sacrifice to his household (he would never have introduced the fish had he known) but he survived
                    and now prospers because of his integrity and leading the way in understanding a new health challenge. It's the kind of moral leadership one needs in this hobby.

                    And it is hats OFF to the club for helping others to be aware. So that they can take precautions. A certain radio network news reporter used to always tell the "rest of the news" and they would be especially important here. My hunch is that proper protocall of QT was not followed and resulted in the outbreak.

                    So what should we learn from this? put our head in the sand and live in fear of any new purchase? HECK NO!!! continue to buy fish, support the breeders and dealers and the hobby and the joy new prospects bring BUT for goodness sake have a great QT facility and don't be negligent
                    or ignorant in usung it properly.
                    Definitely.

                    Since it has been quiet on the KHV front for a few years, people tend to forget that it 'went away' because everyone was taking the risk very seriously. It is not so long ago that such mainstays as Sakai Fish Farm and Momotaro had KHV issues. They acted with integrity, and earned increased respect. Major dealers all around the world dealt with their own outbreaks. Snaden was not alone. Those who tried to deny facts are mostly not around anymore. Those that acted responsibly and openly have more loyal followings today. But, nobody can take away the heartbreak of old friends being lost.

                    This episode is a sad reminder that KHV has not gone away. It is still around, even if the steps taken by the major breeders and dealers have greatly reduced the frequency of reports. Step outside that circle of safety and evil is lurking. Everyone has to take responsibility to protect their koi the best they can, or be ready to accept the consequences. The first step is not to acquire any koi from an unknown source, whether that be an unknown dealer, an unknown breeder or a guy across town with koi to be rescued. If you do not know enough to have confidence in the bio-security of the chain of commerce that has placed a koi before your eyes, then pass it by and take the time to learn about it before considering an acquisition.
                    Last edited by MikeM; 05-06-2015, 12:22 PM. Reason: typo

                    Comment

                    • #11

                      Everyone has to take responsibility to protect their koi the best they can, or be ready to accept the consequences. The first step is not to acquire any koi from an unknown source, whether that be an unknown dealer, an unknown breeder or a guy across town with koi to be rescued. If you do not know enough to have confidence in the bio-security of the chain of commerce that has placed a koi before your eyes, then pass it by and take the time to learn about it before considering an acquisition.
                      Sport on!!!! And only purchase from one source at a time. That way if there is a problem, you know who to talk to about it since there is a known chain of evidence.
                      Koi keeping is not a belief system; it is applied science with a touch of artistry.

                      Comment

                      • #12

                        Hello Dinh,

                        My understanding is that multiple ponds suffered mass mortalities after adding koi purchased at the show. One was a 20 year stable pond where the owner decided to upgrade with koi purchased from the suspect dealer (only addition to pond in years). The pond broke first with most parasites known to ponders then the mortalities started; she lost somewhere around 70 koi. An AquaVet assisted and sent samples to UCDavis, who confirmed KHV. Jack Chapman has done an outstanding job of networking with parties involved and sending out alerts to club members and other clubs in the SoCal area who might have been impacted.

                        While we're on the subject, thought I'd add this plug for the upcoming AKCA Wet Lab in June:

                        CKC-Report to AKCA May, 2015…by Jerold Kyle, Club Rep

                        Camellia Koi Club will be hosting the AKCA Annual Meeting and KHA Wet Lab in Sacramento in June. Dr, Nick Saint-Erne, DMV, will be presenting the Koi Health Advisor Wet Lab which will be open to attendees to sit in and observe along with KHA Students. With news of the latest breakout of KHV it is timely that he has invited Dr. Aimee Reed DMV, PhD, CertAqV at Oregon State University to speak and help at the Wet Lab. Dr. Reed earned her third PhD working on KHV research that AKCA and its clubs have funded and research reports have been published. Dr, Reed will tell us in layman’s terms what has been learned and why the excitement of where it might lead. This is simply one more reason enthusiasm is building over this year’s meeting and Wet Lab.
                        Don Chandler
                        Member: AKCA, ZNA, KoiUSA

                        Comment

                        • #13

                          This outbreak appears to have been well-investigated to identify the source. Usually the source cannot be identified with confidence.

                          I am hoping there will be an update as to the source of the koi being sold by this dealer. But, if the koi were from multiple sources, it may never be known.

                          Comment

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