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Washing filter and medias with Tap Water.

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  • Washing filter and medias with Tap Water.

    Hello Friends,

    Some people say: Tap Water is Killing Beneficial Bacteria. Tap water was treated by chlorine therefore very less amount of chlorine by reacting nitrogen compound will produce Chloramine.

    This will kill beneficial Bacteria and in a same time may dangerous for fish too.

    I will be appreciated to know your idea in this case?
  • #2

    Yes, tap water containing chlorine or chloramine will kill the beneficial bacteria. The extent depends on the exposure time, concentration, etc.

    So, the issue is how to best clean media of the debris that gets captured. The great benefit of 'moving bed' media is that the media does not capture a material amount of debris. All static media arrangements do, some more quickly than others. Cleaning media with pond water or dechlorinated tap water is hard work. The key to reducing the labor is to have the most effective mechanical filtration you can so little debris reaches the bio-media. Since the same types of media can serve both a mechanical filtration role and a bio-filtration role. Filter mats work for either purpose. Kaldnes type media is excellent for mechanical filtration when static, and excellent for bio-filtration in a 'moving bed' application. When mats or kaldnes-type media are used for mechanical filtration, they also serve a bio-filtration role for a while. When mats are blocked by algae glarf they cannot be adequately cleaned without the pressure of a hose using tap water. The same is true of brushes ('rolls' in the Japanese articles). If relying on mats, be sure there are enough that the ones that become blocked with algae glarf can be cleaned with a hose, while rest can be cleaned by simply swishing around in a vat of pond water/dechlorinated water.

    We spend much more time talking about bio-filtration than mechanical filtration. Sometimes this makes it seem that mechanical filtration is not as important. This is unfortunate. Mechanical filtration is very important and often involves the most labor. Bottom drains, gravity-flow systems, settlement tanks and sieves are all about reducing the work required in eliminating solids from the pond.

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    • #3

      Originally posted by MikeM View Post
      We spend much more time talking about bio-filtration than mechanical filtration. Sometimes this makes it seem that mechanical filtration is not as important. This is unfortunate. Mechanical filtration is very important and often involves the most labor. Bottom drains, gravity-flow systems, settlement tanks and sieves are all about reducing the work required in eliminating solids from the pond.
      Really? I think it is the other way around. Hobbyist focus more on mechanical filtration and don't appreciate the importance of biological filtration.

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