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  • Goldfish and Anchor Worms

    Hi All and Merry Christmas!,

    My friend just bought me some goldfish for Christmas but they have anchor worms.
    I have access to some Trichlorfon (Neguvon) but am not sure know how to use it.
    I did some readings online and it is recommended to treat 3 times, 1 week apart for each treatment.

    However, I do wonder about what temperature my aquarium should be at because I understand parasites mature faster in higher temperature.
    It helps that I have a heater.
    So what temperature do I set it at? like 28C?
    Also, I live in a tropical country, temps are usually 26-29C. Other Water Params Ph 8.1, Kh 4, Gh 4.

    or should I alter the treatment frequency?

    Thanks and Happy holidays!
    -Harry
  • #2

    Your temperature is fine. Anchor worms (Lernea) get active at much lower temperatures. However, my understanding is that Trichlorofon will kill larvae in the water, but not the adults on the fish. The following is an article on treatments.... But, I'd never use copper for anything!

    Carbamate insecticides such as aldicarb (Temik), carbofuran (Furadan), and carbaryl (Sevin) will kill even adult anchor worms if treatment is continued at 0.5 ppm (0.18 grams per 100 gallons, not a lot) twice a week in the water for two months. Nicotinoid insecticides such as Imidacloprid have a similar utility.

    The oral dog medications ivermecten and doramectin will kill even adult anchor worms in fish. Add these medications to some food (see directions below) and feed for four weeks minimum.

    Anchor worms are arthropods and have an exoskeleton. In arthropods, exoskeleton development is interfered with by organophosphate insecticides. So anchor worm nymph stages in the water can be treated with insecticides like trichlorofon (Blue Planet ParaCide), cyromazine (Microbe-Lift Lice and Anchor Worm Treatment), Dylox (Dyacide) and diflubenzuron (Dimilin-X, Jungle Labs Anchors Away, JBL Aradol). This will NOT kill adults on the fish.

    Other organophosphate insecticides such as malathion, chlorpyrifos and diazinon can be used at one drop per 25 gallons. Note Fritz Aquatics Mardel Clout (Metronidazole and Trichlorfon) is no longer being sold. The availability of these medications varies greatly depending on the nation where one is located. Put the insecticide into the water column. It won’t affect the beneficial bacteria in the filter. The treatment should be once a week for two months.

    Do NOT use household insecticides to treat anchor worms. Most household insecticides are a class of insecticides known as pyrethrinoids and these are VERY toxic to fish.

    Anchor worms can also be killed by copper medications at the same strength as recommended for treating ich. Coppersafe and Seachem Cupramine are two such copper medications. Do not use copper medications in water with a GH lower than 6. If one has soft water, raise the GH by adding ground up Tums tablets or putting crushed coral into the filter in a bag. It is then safe to use a copper medication.

    The long lived adult anchor worms on the fish themselves are very resistant to medications. But the larvae in the water can be killed by medications much easier, stopping the life cycle. This is why treatment must be continued for two months. And one should expect to see the “worms” on the fish intermittently for up to two months.


    GOOD LUCK!

    Comment

    • #3

      Originally posted by MikeM View Post
      Your temperature is fine. Anchor worms (Lernea) get active at much lower temperatures. However, my understanding is that Trichlorofon will kill larvae in the water, but not the adults on the fish. The following is an article on treatments.... But, I'd never use copper for anything!

      Carbamate insecticides such as aldicarb (Temik), carbofuran (Furadan), and carbaryl (Sevin) will kill even adult anchor worms if treatment is continued at 0.5 ppm (0.18 grams per 100 gallons, not a lot) twice a week in the water for two months. Nicotinoid insecticides such as Imidacloprid have a similar utility.

      The oral dog medications ivermecten and doramectin will kill even adult anchor worms in fish. Add these medications to some food (see directions below) and feed for four weeks minimum.

      Anchor worms are arthropods and have an exoskeleton. In arthropods, exoskeleton development is interfered with by organophosphate insecticides. So anchor worm nymph stages in the water can be treated with insecticides like trichlorofon (Blue Planet ParaCide), cyromazine (Microbe-Lift Lice and Anchor Worm Treatment), Dylox (Dyacide) and diflubenzuron (Dimilin-X, Jungle Labs Anchors Away, JBL Aradol). This will NOT kill adults on the fish.

      Other organophosphate insecticides such as malathion, chlorpyrifos and diazinon can be used at one drop per 25 gallons. Note Fritz Aquatics Mardel Clout (Metronidazole and Trichlorfon) is no longer being sold. The availability of these medications varies greatly depending on the nation where one is located. Put the insecticide into the water column. It won’t affect the beneficial bacteria in the filter. The treatment should be once a week for two months.

      Do NOT use household insecticides to treat anchor worms. Most household insecticides are a class of insecticides known as pyrethrinoids and these are VERY toxic to fish.

      Anchor worms can also be killed by copper medications at the same strength as recommended for treating ich. Coppersafe and Seachem Cupramine are two such copper medications. Do not use copper medications in water with a GH lower than 6. If one has soft water, raise the GH by adding ground up Tums tablets or putting crushed coral into the filter in a bag. It is then safe to use a copper medication.

      The long lived adult anchor worms on the fish themselves are very resistant to medications. But the larvae in the water can be killed by medications much easier, stopping the life cycle. This is why treatment must be continued for two months. And one should expect to see the “worms” on the fish intermittently for up to two months.


      GOOD LUCK!
      MikeM

      Thanks for the advice. What I take from this is.

      My temperatures at 26-29C is fine, therefore I am going with 29C.

      However I should treat with Trichlorfon once a week for 2 months, instead of 3 times in 1 week intervals.

      Comment

      • #4

        MikeM

        I hope you are enjoying your holiday.

        After some reading and shopping and it looks like I can get a good deal on Dimilin or Cyromazine.
        Can I use it interchangeably with Trichlorfon?
        I mean use Dimilin or Cyromazine for once a week for 2 months?
        As of the moment, I have no idea which treatment is best...

        Also, I want to set my temps at 30C, would this be okay?

        Comment

        • #5

          If you can acquire Dimilin at a price affordable to you, get it. It is highly recommended by fish farm operators. Some say that a single dose is sufficient, but others say a second dose should be given after about a week. Two doses is all that you need do according to nearly all reports. One dose is said to be enough when used in clean vats (lacking the algae, organics, etc. of a pond.) If you get it pre-packaged for use against anchor worm & fish lice, there should be instructions on how much to use based on the strength of the product. There is an old post on a South African forum about how it was over-dosed (with no harm to fish, but at unnecessary expense) because somebody confused gallons & litres. Dimilin containing 25% flubenzurone can be dosed at the rate of 1 gram per 4,000 gallons. There was no harm to the fish when dosed at 1 gram per 1,000 litres.

          A temperature of 30C is fine. Personally, I'd not go too much higher since that is rather warm for the fish & plenty warm enough for speeding up the life cycle of the parasites.

          BTW.... these gift fish may prove rather costly. There's a lesson in this about free fish.

          Best of luck!

          Comment

          • #6

            MikeM


            Happy New Year,

            I having a little trouble with the forum interface..
            Again, I think what you meant for Dimilin (25% Diflubenzuron) was the standard dose being 1gram per 4000 liters. However someone overdosed 4x the concentration but the fish were unharmed.

            I can get Diflubenzuron at 98% purity. $7 per 5 grams.
            https://www.lazada.com.ph/products/d...kSZ2C&search=1

            Dosing with this will be like 250mg per 4000 liters.
            I found an article from University of Florida saying the dosage for Diflubenzuron is 0.66mg/L. That is 66mg per 1000L or 264mg per 4000L which is quite close.

            I can also get the Dimilin Compound
            https://www.lazada.com.ph/products/s...5E11f&search=1

            or
            https://www.lazada.com.ph/products/d...FPcyA&search=1

            Is it better to use 98% Diflubenzuron? or the Dimilin compound? I dont know if the other constituents of Dimilin are Beneficial?
            Which to use and What dosage?


            Thanks!

            Comment

            • #7

              The pure chemical would be fine. Just have to take care with the calculations. Fortunately, it seems the margin of error is in your favor.

              Comment

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