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  • Tap Water

    I was wondering if I left a constant light spray of water from my tap in my main pond would I need to use decloranator. I dont do as many water changes as I need to and was wondering if this would help or would it hurt my koi. My waterfall is very strong and the pond is 1200 gallons. Any comments.
  • #2

    there are few factors that you will need to consider:

    1. whether chroline or chrolamine (sp?) is used in your tap water. If chrolamine is used, spraying don't do much to get them out of the water, and chroline is released slowly over a few days. The effect can be deadly if it is allowed to accumulate during this period. (mines uses chrolamine)

    2. ppm of the chemical in 1. Some tap water companies use higher concentration (mine does)

    3. the amount of water you are adding into your pond during this time period, in % of the total pond volumn

    For me, I will definately add dechro if I replace 10% or more water in my pond, at 1.5X the recommended dosage. 5% is where I may or may not add dechro.

    stan

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    • #3

      Thanks Stan. I think that is what I will do this summer, they need the clean water and Jack does not like helping me clean the pond as it take all day and this way I wont have to clean so much.

      Comment

      • #4

        I am sure this wont work because I thought it up, but I am interested from a learning stand point the whys of it not working.

        Could you have a water garden pond of 5-600 gallons with nothing but plants watter lettuce hyacinths parrot feather all cleaner type plants and exchange water between the two on say a weekly basis? The water going to the koi pond would be clean the water coming back to the water garden would be packed with fish waste etc to help the plants grow?
        Other than having to keep tabs on another water source to gaurd against something getting in your water garden water and getting to your koi pond what else makes this not work?

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        • #5

          Shows your thinking!

          point I'd like you to take with you is that water wears out with use. Everything takes from it. Fish, plants, bacteria, they remove minerals and other things needed for life. That's why the constant trickle in with new water really is the best of all worlds. yes, it increases your water bill, but if you don't have to deal with sick fish it's worth it!
          Dick Benbow

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          • #6

            KFG: Check the old thread I started on water changes. HenryC did an experiment and found chlorine levels remained high after spraying tap water into a container. The time it takes for chlorine to dissipate is related to water hardness characteristics (which I do not understand adequately to attempt to explain). There will be different results in soft water than in very hard water. So, it is important to understand your source water. I would suggest picking up a test kit for chlorine (not very expensive) and use it on a bucket (clean) of fresh tap water. Test every 30 minutes until there is no detectable chlorine. You will then know an important characteristic of your tap water ... chlorine retention. NOTE: How it works in your pond will differ, because the chlorine will oxidize organics, dissipating at a faster rate than in a clean bucket. Those organics include the skin, gills, and mucous layer of your koi.

            Comment

            • #7

              Would like to add my 2 cents worth.

              I have lost fish due to accidents with what was supposed to be water trickle into the pond. I have sinced added 2 safety precautions.

              1. Filtered source water to rid off chlorine.

              2. Store water in FG tanks, keep overnight with airstone bubbling throughout...just in case filter in 1. malfunction.

              And I use this to do 10% water change daily.

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              • #8

                Airstone over night is just to oxygenate the water really well before bringing it into pond or does this help in some other ways?

                So fill up your bucket or container or whatever you are using place an air stone and some sort of chlorine filter set up above pond level and a hose running from that to your pond in a slow steady drip would be a good thing to do especially if it is full up with fish? I haven't done many water changes so to speak other than refilling my little mud hole from loses from evaporation. I will try this out and see how it goes. The more I learn the more I learn that I really suck at this

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                • #9

                  Quote : Airstone over night is just to oxygenate the water really well before bringing it into pond or does this help in some other ways?

                  Using the airstone has duo functions the 1st of which is more important.

                  1. Get rid of chlorine. I used to test the chlorine level regularly before replenishing my pond with this stored water (before I installed my activated carbon prefilter). Almost invariably zero.

                  2. Oxygenation.

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                  • #10

                    Hi Doc are you saying that I can run my water though the carbon to get rid of chlorine? Correct me if Im misunderstanding you. If that is the case that would be a simple thing to do to keep clean water in my pond. How long would this stuff last and how much would I need to use?

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                    • #11

                      So say someone had this dinky little watergarden and they wanted to try this out would they be able to.

                      Run a hose from a water spigot that never gets used because it is in an out of the way area to a 10 gallon bucket with a lid made to conect with the hose and air holes in the lid to let out air. The water at a drip travels through the hose into the bucket where you have a smaller bucket filled with screens and activated carbon or just some replacement filters like used in aquariums the water then comes out of the bottom of that bucket through holes into the main bucket where the air stone is, finally to exit the bucket through another, but much smaller hose to the pond.
                      You know not that I am planning a trip to the hardware store or anything
                      I just think it is a great way to replace water lost from spitters and waterfalls. The higher PH from the tap water wont effect pond PH with it being small amounts spread over the course of time will it? My tap water isn't off the charts PH wise but it is higher.

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                      • #12

                        It si true that cl got 'disposed off' thru aging, in a day or 2. And that is what brought chrolamin to most water companies in northern America. It is supposed to release its cl component into the water slowly. Under this scenerio, you may need multiple aging ponds/tanks for regular water replenishment.

                        stan

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                        • #13

                          Originally posted by dick benbow
                          Shows your thinking!

                          point I'd like you to take with you is that water wears out with use. Everything takes from it. Fish, plants, bacteria, they remove minerals and other things needed for life. That's why the constant trickle in with new water really is the best of all worlds. yes, it increases your water bill, but if you don't have to deal with sick fish it's worth it!
                          Dick,
                          What would be the recommended daily water change? I've been hearing 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% etc. In your opinion for a 10000-12000 gallon pond. What percentage water change is acceptable? I'm looking at that 10% and then thinking to myself 1200 gallons, EVERYDAY for 30 days thats 36000 gallons a month....thats amounts to appox. four hundred dollars a month that means $4800 a year.....oh my.

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                          • #14

                            we are starting to see water resources being stressed here in Northern California too. We were talking water rationing last year. So we will not have the lux to do the type of change top tier itchies prefer.

                            stan

                            Comment

                            • #15

                              Dear Koifishgirl

                              The activated carbon filter only remove certain things (cannot remember what else but it includes chlorine) and is attached to my mains just before the water meter. It is not meant to replace our pond filtration system.

                              It comes in a casing very much like the commercial O2 tanks you see at the koi dealers. This means the amount of materials used is predetermined by the size of this prefilter. Mine also has a mechanical filter in-built. Needs regular back-flush. Just in case you are not aware there are some very similar prefilters that give you soft water.

                              The dealer said the materials will last for at least a year but I am sceptical and as such have them replaced every 6 months. Can't take risks with our kois, can we? Same reason why I still store the water overnight.

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