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    Hi
    I live in Eastern PA USA and I have had Koi in my pond for almost 6 years now. This is the first winter that my pond froze over for close to 6 weeks. There was always a hole provided by the circular deicer disc.
    Now the weather is warming up and I uncovered the pond (had a net cover over it since Fall) and noticed one fish (large common koi) lying on side, now laying at the bottom on it's side, and when I tried to remove it thinking it was dead, it started moving a little so I put it back. I don't think it's going to survive.
    Any thoughts? All the other fish are fine, still swimming in the bottom, but moving normally.
    When this fish passes (will) it float or what?
    I hate winter!!! Especially when it comes to my pond and poor fish!
  • #2

    Welcome to the board. I'll let folks experienced with true winter advise you. I hope you hang around and add your thoughts to subjects that come up. Good luck!

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    • #3

      Thanks Mike. I was just out there...covering the pond back up w/ netting and decided to take another look at the koi on his side. He looked lifeless, yet when I scooped him out w/ my fishing net he turned his head and opened his mouth, so I put him back. I feel bad. I know there isn't much for me to do at this point. But I am hoping someone can say YEAH or NAY that he (or she) might survive.

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      • #4

        I don't know much about cold since I live in southern Louisiana but do not keep fooling with the fish. This stresses it out even more.

        Some fish just do not like cold weather. It may perk up and do fine once the water begins to warm so don't give up hope yet.

        I'll let others take over from here. Good luck.
        The views expressed above are my own personal views and, as such, do not necessarily reflect the views of the AKCA or the KHA program.
        SANDY

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        • #5

          Most Koi laying on thier side after experiencing a difficult winter are in good health just showing thier stress over water colder than they are comfortable in. Leave the Koi alone and wait till the water gets into the 50's, then you'll see it swimming more normally. next year you will need to make provisions to provide enough heat to get them thru at no lower than 52 F. This can be done with a greenhouse type covering, and eliminating the filter return via a waterfall which in winter acts as a chilling tower.

          Trying to net or handle under these conditions creates more stress and will work against you after all is said and done. I know you meant well, and you do have to be pro-active when your koi aren't acting well, but this is part of the learning curve for Koi keepers in cold climates.

          welcome on board.....
          Dick Benbow

          Comment

          • #6

            It has been a tough winter this year hasn't it.
            I'd listen to Dick. He's been around the block a time or 20 (or more). If it should happen to expire it will float up and if that happens you want it out asap, but there is a good chance it can come around.
            Larry Iles
            Oklahoma

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            • #7

              THANKS SO SO MUCH!
              I appreciate all of your helpful words.
              I will just leave every be for now.
              Anyway....thanks so much~

              Comment

              • #8

                [QUOTE=dick benbow;155120]Most Koi laying on thier side after experiencing a difficult winter are in good health just showing thier stress over water colder than they are comfortable in. Leave the Koi alone and wait till the water gets into the 50's, then you'll see it swimming more normally.heat to get them thru at no lower than 52 F.

                I have found that the life of fish laying on their sides was a lot shorter.
                The temperature seems to be below 40f before they do that.
                Water freezes at 32f but can get slushy at 36f inhibiting gill movment and
                probable health damage. It is best to have a cover over the pond and avoid ice forming. If a pond is covered and at least 4ft deep your lowest temperature is not likely to drop below 42f. you will still need to do some water changes.
                Regards
                Eugene

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