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Koi Historians-What do Champions die of?

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  • Koi Historians-What do Champions die of?

    I have been suprised at the very short lives of many of the best known champions of koi-dom.

    The Loran thread got me wondering what these fabulous fish, who no doubt get the most expert care in the koi-keeping world actually die of?

    I heard one story about a Sakai fish which was dropped onto the floor by a careless handler---could that be true?
    ChrisC
  • #2

    Originally posted by ChrisC
    I have been suprised at the very short lives of many of the best known champions of koi-dom.

    The Loran thread got me wondering what these fabulous fish, who no doubt get the most expert care in the koi-keeping world actually die of?

    I heard one story about a Sakai fish which was dropped onto the floor by a careless handler---could that be true?
    Like every Champion there has to be a fall from grace. We have to remember that at any show any fish can win and to win a show twice says alot. Okay let's get into jumbo fish champions. Loran is an exception, let's just say this fish was lucky to survive the first cull. If it had been any other breeder loran wouldn't have made it. Plus, it was the dealer skill to condition the fish to where it was when it won.

    The life after a show is short lived for many champs, reason being is the condition prior to the show. Sakai Hiroshima fish have short lives due to the unatural conditions they are pushed to grow. Once these fish are taken from this environment of force feeding, pure O2 their immune system gets worst. So from the stress of bringing the fish to show and taking it back from show the fish gives up.

    Fish being dropped, I could believe it, but tell you this even the most experienced handler makes mistakes. I saw a video of the 95 All-japan Shinkokai and they had Izumiya only handling the jumbo fish. That is the trust they put in a guy with more experience then some of us put together.
    The world sleeps as the chance to learn something new passes.

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    • #3

      Like any pet, they depend on thier keeper to give them quality of life.


      Chris, Bill Blackburn has down a respectatble job locally of caring for his GC's and having them repeat as champions. he has also lost a few. one goshiki, not a GC but popular in the shows died one day with nary a mark on her?

      I quess that's what makes our wet pets so popular. They are living. They are vulnerable. Each time you transport a fish back and forth to a show you are
      enlarging the possibilities for mishap.
      Dick Benbow

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      • #4

        These big koi can die under wierd circumstances just as easily as the "usual" ways. We had a former (99) GC of our local show die last summer at age 13 of a Stomach Lymphoma. Cancer, confirmed by autopsy and pathologists report. No marks on her, she just stopped eating and died a month later. Still had fairly good color and conformation. She is in the middle of this picture, sorry had no good digital ones.
        Best regards,

        Bob Winkler

        My opinions are my best interpretation of my experiences. They are not set in stone as I intend to always be a student of life. And Koi.

        sigpic

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        • #5

          Bob-what a loss. I am so sorry. What a huge, gorgeous fish. I am beginning to learn that 12-14 years old is a fairly typical lifespan for these high quality fish. Is that right?

          Dick-your story about Bill B's fish is the stuff of my show-chair nightmares these days.
          ChrisC

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